James Bond In a Play

RecipeRecipe Banned
edited July 2013 in Fan Creations Posts: 56
In theatre we are currently studying how to write a play, dramatic production, you name it.

I need to come up with an idea for a play, cast it, produce it - the lot.

Could you adapt Bond for the stage? HOW would you make it dramatic eneough. Would you go back in time to make it a period piece? Maybe 17th century?

Do you think Bond could work on Boardway?

Comments

  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 23,640
    Not news. Moved to Fan Creations.
  • RecipeRecipe Banned
    Posts: 56
    Thanks Dimi look to get some feedback on this
  • Posts: 76
    Some of Flemings original stories could be a possibility, they have made many of them into radio plays, and of course the very first casino royale was a play for television.
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 14,046
    OHMSS would be the one to do. Romance, tragedy, musical interludes. It would make a superb play.
  • SandySandy Somewhere in Europe
    Posts: 4,012
    Quantum of Solace (the short story) is perfect for stage in my opinion.
  • Posts: 14,865
    I would adapt a short story, personally, like Sandy said QOS would work especially. If a novel, TSWLM would work well on stage because of its small scale and little number of characters.
  • edited July 2013 Posts: 388
    For a play, you typically need a story with a limited number of characters and locations.

    This rules out most of the Fleming stories and all of the films. Not sure Sandy's suggestion of QoS would work as I think that the story is so much about the narration rather than the events depicted. Although YMMV, and I certainly understand where she's coming from.

    My suggestion would be TSWLM. More or less the entire story (if you drop the London flashbacks) takes place within a couple of rooms of a motel. You would only need 4 lead characters (Vivienne Michel, Bond, Sluggsy and Horror) and 2 supporting characters (creepy Mr Phancey at the beginning and the avuncular police officer at the end) and most of the action would be relatively simple to depict - light effects for the huge fire at the end and squibs / sound effects for gunshots. You could add a lot of atmosphere (the storm raging outside) with the sound design. You'd probably have to adapt the few exterior scenes to work indoors but that would be fine, I think.

    The only way to make it for Broadway would be a 39 Steps-style spoof but can't imagine that working.

    Not sure why on earth you would want to adapt Bond to set it in the 17th century?
  • Posts: 66
    I've read before that continuation author Raymond Benson tried to adapt Casino Royale as a stage play in the 90's. Might have been interesting.
  • Posts: 14,865
    For a play, you typically need a story with a limited number of characters and locations.

    This rules out most of the Fleming stories and all of the films. Not sure Sandy's suggestion of QoS would work as I think that the story is so much about the narration rather than the events depicted. Although YMMV, and I certainly understand where she's coming from.

    My suggestion would be TSWLM. More or less the entire story (if you drop the London flashbacks) takes place within a couple of rooms of a motel. You would only need 4 lead characters (Vivienne Michel, Bond, Sluggsy and Horror) and 2 supporting characters (creepy Mr Phancey at the beginning and the avuncular police officer at the end) and most of the action would be relatively simple to depict - light effects for the huge fire at the end and squibs / sound effects for gunshots. You could add a lot of atmosphere (the storm raging outside) with the sound design. You'd probably have to adapt the few exterior scenes to work indoors but that would be fine, I think.

    The only way to make it for Broadway would be a 39 Steps-style spoof but can't imagine that working.

    Not sure why on earth you would want to adapt Bond to set it in the 17th century?

    QOS would work fine as a play, you can easily create flash backs with minimal effects on stage, especially in such a story as QOS.
  • Ludovico wrote:
    For a play, you typically need a story with a limited number of characters and locations.

    This rules out most of the Fleming stories and all of the films. Not sure Sandy's suggestion of QoS would work as I think that the story is so much about the narration rather than the events depicted. Although YMMV, and I certainly understand where she's coming from.

    My suggestion would be TSWLM. More or less the entire story (if you drop the London flashbacks) takes place within a couple of rooms of a motel. You would only need 4 lead characters (Vivienne Michel, Bond, Sluggsy and Horror) and 2 supporting characters (creepy Mr Phancey at the beginning and the avuncular police officer at the end) and most of the action would be relatively simple to depict - light effects for the huge fire at the end and squibs / sound effects for gunshots. You could add a lot of atmosphere (the storm raging outside) with the sound design. You'd probably have to adapt the few exterior scenes to work indoors but that would be fine, I think.

    The only way to make it for Broadway would be a 39 Steps-style spoof but can't imagine that working.

    Not sure why on earth you would want to adapt Bond to set it in the 17th century?

    QOS would work fine as a play, you can easily create flash backs with minimal effects on stage, especially in such a story as QOS.

    Sure you can. The Woman in Black is a great example. I didn't express myself very clearly. The reason I think QoS wouldn't work is because the real interest in the story, for me anyway, is in the narration of the story. It's exactly as depicted in the novel - a classic after dinner tale made great in its telling. There aren't really any scenes to dramatise as such - Philip Masters sitting awkwardly on the plane being fussed over by Rhonda, the argument in the house etc. Not sure how one would go about it except by using it as the dramatic skeleton for an adapted play? As I said though, YMMV
  • SandySandy Somewhere in Europe
    Posts: 4,012
    Ludovico wrote:
    For a play, you typically need a story with a limited number of characters and locations.

    This rules out most of the Fleming stories and all of the films. Not sure Sandy's suggestion of QoS would work as I think that the story is so much about the narration rather than the events depicted. Although YMMV, and I certainly understand where she's coming from.

    My suggestion would be TSWLM. More or less the entire story (if you drop the London flashbacks) takes place within a couple of rooms of a motel. You would only need 4 lead characters (Vivienne Michel, Bond, Sluggsy and Horror) and 2 supporting characters (creepy Mr Phancey at the beginning and the avuncular police officer at the end) and most of the action would be relatively simple to depict - light effects for the huge fire at the end and squibs / sound effects for gunshots. You could add a lot of atmosphere (the storm raging outside) with the sound design. You'd probably have to adapt the few exterior scenes to work indoors but that would be fine, I think.

    The only way to make it for Broadway would be a 39 Steps-style spoof but can't imagine that working.

    Not sure why on earth you would want to adapt Bond to set it in the 17th century?

    QOS would work fine as a play, you can easily create flash backs with minimal effects on stage, especially in such a story as QOS.

    Sure you can. The Woman in Black is a great example. I didn't express myself very clearly. The reason I think QoS wouldn't work is because the real interest in the story, for me anyway, is in the narration of the story. It's exactly as depicted in the novel - a classic after dinner tale made great in its telling. There aren't really any scenes to dramatise as such - Philip Masters sitting awkwardly on the plane being fussed over by Rhonda, the argument in the house etc. Not sure how one would go about it except by using it as the dramatic skeleton for an adapted play? As I said though, YMMV

    I just happen to love that kind of play, little more than a couple of actors talking to each other. Provided the actors are of high caliber, of course ;)
  • hullcityfanhullcityfan Banned
    Posts: 496
    Risico never read the book but seems good or the Hilderbrand variety? Both short stories and as Cubby always said in EON go back to Fleming.
  • Posts: 14,865
    Sandy wrote:
    Ludovico wrote:
    For a play, you typically need a story with a limited number of characters and locations.

    This rules out most of the Fleming stories and all of the films. Not sure Sandy's suggestion of QoS would work as I think that the story is so much about the narration rather than the events depicted. Although YMMV, and I certainly understand where she's coming from.

    My suggestion would be TSWLM. More or less the entire story (if you drop the London flashbacks) takes place within a couple of rooms of a motel. You would only need 4 lead characters (Vivienne Michel, Bond, Sluggsy and Horror) and 2 supporting characters (creepy Mr Phancey at the beginning and the avuncular police officer at the end) and most of the action would be relatively simple to depict - light effects for the huge fire at the end and squibs / sound effects for gunshots. You could add a lot of atmosphere (the storm raging outside) with the sound design. You'd probably have to adapt the few exterior scenes to work indoors but that would be fine, I think.

    The only way to make it for Broadway would be a 39 Steps-style spoof but can't imagine that working.

    Not sure why on earth you would want to adapt Bond to set it in the 17th century?

    QOS would work fine as a play, you can easily create flash backs with minimal effects on stage, especially in such a story as QOS.

    Sure you can. The Woman in Black is a great example. I didn't express myself very clearly. The reason I think QoS wouldn't work is because the real interest in the story, for me anyway, is in the narration of the story. It's exactly as depicted in the novel - a classic after dinner tale made great in its telling. There aren't really any scenes to dramatise as such - Philip Masters sitting awkwardly on the plane being fussed over by Rhonda, the argument in the house etc. Not sure how one would go about it except by using it as the dramatic skeleton for an adapted play? As I said though, YMMV

    I just happen to love that kind of play, little more than a couple of actors talking to each other. Provided the actors are of high caliber, of course ;)

    Same here. And I have seen plays consisting mainly of narration working beautifully.
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