Many have tried to kill him, but what if Bond's new nemesis placed a serious bounty on his head?

JRRJRR
edited March 2013 in Bond 26 & Beyond Posts: 74
The villains seem to struggle with really shaking the persistence of 007; maybe if a bounty of obscene proportions were to be waged to a mercenary or several within the community, to take Bond out by any means by a mastermind new nemesis; he/she could then, undisturbed, drive his/her evil agenda on-wards, in the hope that 007 is so preoccupied, or to his/her mind or more specifically dealt with in a more permanent nature.

This could open possibilities of a whole range of new henchmen with intricate and colourful personalities to sideline a more involved Bond plot. Such an audacious target as James Bond may concern the more careful working is this world, but the financial reward may equally tempt the absolute greedy and egotistical.
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Comments

  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 4,826
    This was a John Gardner novel.
  • SandySandy Somewhere in Europe
    Posts: 4,012
    echo wrote:
    This was a John Gardner novel.

    Still, an interesting idea to use in a film.
  • X3MSonicXX3MSonicX https://www.behance.net/gallery/86760163/Fa-Posteres-de-007-No-Time-To-Die
    Posts: 2,635
    Nice, I agree with @Sandy. It would be a perfect idea for Bond 24 or even 25.
  • Sounds too much like a certain Clouseau film ;)

  • Creasy47Creasy47 In Cuba with Natalya.Moderator
    Posts: 36,603
    Excluding the bounty, that's pretty much what Bond already does: dodges, fights, and kills henchmen, mercenaries, and assassins on his way to stopping the big nemesis of the film.
  • SuperheroSithSuperheroSith SE London
    edited March 2013 Posts: 578
    I have to hand it to @Creasy47; he is right.
    If my teacher were here then she would say that this was an excellent use of a semi-colon.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 I've missed you all.
    edited March 2013 Posts: 28,476
    This has basically already happened in the 60s. SPECTRE try again and again to kill Bond to get rid of him after DN, since he is so wonderfully talented in ruining their plans. I recall that Blofeld even tells Klebb in FRWL that Bond's death will be revenge for Dr. No's murder.
  • brinkeguthriebrinkeguthrie Piz Gloria
    Posts: 1,252
    I always wondered about this. Bond even says in a novel that They know where he lives.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 20,780
    Please limit the 'what if' threads to a strict minimum, folks. They usually don't last too far beyond one or two pages...
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 I've missed you all.
    Posts: 28,476
    =bg= wrote:
    I always wondered about this. Bond even says in a novel that They know where he lives.

    Who? SMERSH?
  • JRRJRR
    Posts: 74
    Bounty hunters are a motivating component to a story-line, as they would be working to their agenda and only for the hard cash, some will have very little principles and being hired to remove 007 as a distraction from the nemesis’s real aim, will leave a lot of blind alleys and little evidence for Bond to work with, or to connect him back to the source of his adversary.

    With a hit lined up on the grapevine, Bond would have connections and past contacts to warn him of the pending danger, he would also have many ready to settle old scores and some he could possibly bribe to turn the tables on those who had been hired to kill him.

    All idea’s can be compared to others gone before, but there are some with mileage left in them depending on how they are developed and delivered to an audience.

    I don’t envy the script writer of the future Bond films, the past and present success coupled with the expectations of the James Bond audience are quite impressive, so all involved in the production of these movies have it all on the line, every time.
  • brinkeguthriebrinkeguthrie Piz Gloria
    Posts: 1,252
    =bg= wrote:
    I always wondered about this. Bond even says in a novel that They know where he lives.

    Who? SMERSH?

    Ah, I forget. I know it was the novel where May grumbles that someone stopped by to sell them a TV set "for hire purchase if you please." But I mean there's his flat right there, car parked right on the street ready to locomote. Wouldn't be too hard to whack him there, right?

  • Posts: 13,739
    That would be an interesting avenue to take. It has been done before in Operation Broken Grounds, the first volume of the graphic novels series Queen & Country: after the heroine Tara Chace executes a corrupted Russian general, there is a million dollars bounty on her head by the Russian mob. The same story could work beautifully in a Bond, with Bond completing a mission in a PTS, which would trigger the anger of a criminal group. The problem is: it has been done before in the aforementioned graphic novel.

    More about it here:

    http://www.onipress.com/titles/h/161
  • samainsysamainsy Suspended
    Posts: 199
    ummm bountys
  • JRRJRR
    Posts: 74
    Some dirty politics could flavour a new outing, with a group of politicians protecting and supplying information to a contact who presents themselves as a squeaky clean entrepreneur on the surface, but behind the scenes is a clandestine world level arms dealer tying deals together whilst visiting other countries under the guise of his/her more publicly presentable companies business ventures.

    The politicians could profiteer through hidden transactions and off shore accounts, that over time, fall under the suspicion to the more upstanding government members, due to the corrupted enjoying less than obvious lavish living and expensive toys, stupidly advertised amongst their peers.

    Bond could be put onto the case to curtail the illegal arms trading abroad and unravel the thread leading back to a corrupt politicians; with their many high level connections, their only recourse would be to have him set up in a highly compromising situation, which would result in him being removed from his “00” status, and to curb any further unwanted interference's have him hunted down or meet with what would seem to be an unfortunate accident.

    This would leave Bond locked out of his normal reliable channels and looked at as a possible threat to his country, with a possible kill order out on him, other foreign governments would be obliged to assist in his capture or demise, leaving him purely on his own and forced to tackle the rot within the country he has fought long and hard to protect.
  • Posts: 13,739
    My question: how much would a bounty on Bond's head be?
  • JRRJRR
    edited April 2013 Posts: 74
    A world level arms dealer would not want his/her business to be decommissioned or even temporarily disrupted, partly due to their greed and ego, but more precisely their selfish lifestyle depends on it, so the bounty would be well into the tens of millions, perhaps even one hundred million just to protect interests, and with the assassin holding their future in mind they may consider this the final job rather than having to continually push their luck. That sort of work is bound to have an expiry date; an assassin will want to take advantage of the return on such a risky assignment.
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 15,481
    See John Gardener's Nobody Lives Forever for more details and learn from The Master.
  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,755
    JRR wrote:
    The villains seem to struggle with really shaking the persistence of 007; maybe if a bounty of obscene proportions were to be waged to a mercenary or several within the community, to take Bond out by any means by a mastermind new nemesis; he/she could then, undisturbed, drive his/her evil agenda on-wards, in the hope that 007 is so preoccupied, or to his/her mind or more specifically dealt with in a more permanent nature.

    This could open possibilities of a whole range of new henchmen with intricate and colourful personalities to sideline a more involved Bond plot. Such an audacious target as James Bond may concern the more careful working is this world, but the financial reward may equally tempt the absolute greedy and egotistical.

    I like this story a lot. This would work well with the current villain (Christoph Waltz). Orchestrating a capture or kill on Bond from behind prison bars while Bond is enjoying retirement.

  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    James Bond: I mean sir, who would pay a million dollars to have me killed?

    M: Jealous husbands! Outraged chefs! Humiliated tailors! The list is endless!
  • Posts: 13,739
    suavejmf wrote: »
    James Bond: I mean sir, who would pay a million dollars to have me killed?

    M: Jealous husbands! Outraged chefs! Humiliated tailors! The list is endless!

    With inflation the price would need to go up I think.
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    True.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    His price is far above rubies, or even your million dollars ! ;)
  • Posts: 9,185
    Shrugs the bounty idea is interesting idea but the issue is I feel it has only been done really good in Macgyver Fugitive Gauntlent
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 5,131
    His price is far above rubies, or even your million dollars ! ;)

    Nice OHMSS reference there.

  • HASEROTHASEROT has returned like the tedious inevitability of an unloved season---
    Posts: 4,399
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    See John Gardener's Nobody Lives Forever for more details and learn from The Master.

    i was going to say, wasn't this already the plot from one of the Gardner novels?? lol.

    glad i wasn't the only one who remembered that.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    That's actually my favourite Gardner Bond novel. :)
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 15,481
    That's actually my favourite Gardner Bond novel. :)

    I think many people feel the same way. I'm different though as I think Scorpius (1988) is Gardner's best Bond novel of the 1980s and Never Send Flowers is his best Bond novel of the 1990s (but I'm sure you all knew that already!). ;)
  • Posts: 1,621
    I could see this as a reasonable way to continue on from Spectre while getting the writers out of the corner that Logan, P&W, and Butterworth painted them into.

    Blofeld could offer the bounty from his jail cell, which would upset Bond and Madeleine's quiet existence away from the spy life. While Bond is dealing with keeping himself and Madeleine safe, it gives SPECTRE a chance to recover and reorganize in the absence of Blofeld, allowing for the organization to return to the shadows and conduct its business secretly, under the direction of Irma Bunt.
  • TheWizardOfIceTheWizardOfIce 'One of the Internet's more toxic individuals'
    edited June 2016 Posts: 9,117
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    That's actually my favourite Gardner Bond novel. :)

    I think many people feel the same way. I'm different though as I think Scorpius (1988) is Gardner's best Bond novel of the 1980s and Never Send Flowers is his best Bond novel of the 1990s (but I'm sure you all knew that already!). ;)

    :))

    I doubt NSF is even the best Bond novel of 1993. There has to be someone who wrote a fan fiction Bond story who wins by default.

    After WLD it was pretty much downhill all the way for Gardner's Bond books with slight flickers of good stuff in TMFB and DIF.

    But yes adapting NLF could be cracking premise.

    PTS that copies Bourne Supremacy with Madeline dying accidentally then the briefing with M where it is revealed that there is a price on Bond's head.

    Or given how they love bringing in the MI6 crew mash up the plots of NSF and Colonel Sun and have SPECTRE kidnapping M and MP both as part of some scheme against the British and to lure Bond out of retirement.
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