What Bond reference book are you reading?

1234568

Comments

  • Posts: 2,673
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Some James Bond reference books I look forward to buying.

    I haven't read any of them, but the selection looks promising. Ian Fleming & James Bond: The Spanish Connection was co-written and translated by one of our board members -- @ggl007 -- and should be very good.

    Bond Cars: The Definitive History is written the editor-at-large for Top Gear magazine--I wonder if he had anything to do with the excellent Top Gear TV special on Bond cars.
    Sadanoyama wrote: »
    \Analyses of the "Bond Phenomenon" have been doing the rounds since the mid-60s and, for what it's worth, Kingsley Amis' James Bond Dossier is still a more entertaining read than any of these.

    Amen! I'm still waiting for a study of Fleming that is even half as pleasurable to read. Since you mentioned a reference book on GF, I want to put in a good word for Adrian Turner On Goldfinger, which was published in 1998 and is probably the best book on the film. The analysis of the script's development is fascinating.
  • ggl007ggl007 www.archivo007.com Spain, España
    Posts: 2,512
    Revelator wrote: »
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Some James Bond reference books I look forward to buying.

    I haven't read any of them, but the selection looks promising. Ian Fleming & James Bond: The Spanish Connection was co-written and translated by one of our board members -- @ggl007 -- and should be very good.
    Thanks a lot, my friend! Indeed this is the one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09FS2VB6W/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_8?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

    I hope you like it, @MaxCasino ;)
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,036
    ggl007 wrote: »
    Revelator wrote: »
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Some James Bond reference books I look forward to buying.

    I haven't read any of them, but the selection looks promising. Ian Fleming & James Bond: The Spanish Connection was co-written and translated by one of our board members -- @ggl007 -- and should be very good.
    Thanks a lot, my friend! Indeed this is the one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09FS2VB6W/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_8?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

    I hope you like it, @MaxCasino ;)

    Always happy to learn and hear about other people’s opinions, on something I like!
  • Posts: 1,841
    Sadanoyama wrote: »
    For Christmas, my brother-in-law bought me:

    https://www.amazon.com/James-Bonds-Aston-Martin-DB5/dp/1858756103/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

    Again a big book, beautiful photographs, and very reasonable for the price. If you want to indulge in DB5-porn this is probably the best out there, although in terms of interviews and solid production background on the original 60's film cars, Dave Worrall's The Most Famous Car in the World is much better. However, it's now sadly out of print and painfully expensive.
    Thanks for the views on this book as I've been curious but not willing to pay the price considering I am lucky enough to own the Worrall book. My area libraries don't carry it and in the few bookstores left, the copies I've seen are always sealed. What I'd be curious to read is the stories on the car in the films since the Worrall book was printed, if there is any such information.
  • SadanoyamaSadanoyama Japan
    Posts: 7

    Amen! I'm still waiting for a study of Fleming that is even half as pleasurable to read. Since you mentioned a reference book on GF, I want to put in a good word for Adrian Turner On Goldfinger, which was published in 1998 and is probably the best book on the film. The analysis of the script's development is fascinating.
    [/quote]
    Double Amen to that! That's a real little gem of a book. Mr. Turner is an excellent writer, witty and perceptive. He manages to avoid all the usual cliches-tropes that clog so much writing on the Bond films, especially on Goldfinger.

    Actually, on a Fleming tip, another book I really enjoyed recently is:

    https://www.amazon.com/Kiss-Bang-British-Thrillers-Casino/dp/0008172234

    Mr. Ripley charts the rise of Brit-Bloke-Books from Bond in the 50s up to the (late) Jack Higgins in the 70s. This was definitely my world, as growing up in an RAF household, there was always loads of these rugged books knocking about at home. Mr. Ripley's wry prose certainly brought back many happy memories of elder brothers grandly declaring, "This one's good stuff!" while chucking me yet another dog-eared Alistair Maclean paperback.
  • SadanoyamaSadanoyama Japan
    Posts: 7
    What I'd be curious to read is the stories on the car in the films since the Worrall book was printed, if there is any such information.

    It's a 271 page book, the last 141 pages are devoted to the Brosnan-Craig eras. Lot's of great colour production photos for those films, stories relating to the Skyfall miniatures etc. Actually good content on the early films too. My personal favourite is a full page colour shot of Big Sean and Guy Hamilton chatting beside the DB5 at Stoke Park. Classic stuff.

    It's definitely a lovely companion to the Worrall book, which as it is now 30 years old, is somewhat dated in design and content. I'd go for it. If you have both of em on your shelf you will indeed appear to be unbeatable.

  • edited May 2022 Posts: 2,673
    A new book on Dr. No is on the way from James Chapman (author of Licence to Thrill: A Cultural History of the James Bond Films):

    Dr. No: The First James Bond Film

    9780231204934.jpg?auto=format&w=350
    When Dr. No premiered at the London Pavilion on October 5, 1962, no one predicted that it would launch the longest-running series in cinema history. It introduced the James Bond formula that has been a box-office fixture ever since: sensational plots, colorful locations, beautiful women, diabolical villains, thrilling action set pieces, and a tongue-in-cheek tone. An explosive cocktail of action, spectacle, and sex, Dr. No transformed popular cinema.

    James Chapman provides a lively and comprehensive study of Dr. No, marshaling a wealth of archival research to place the film in its historical moment. He demonstrates that, contrary to many fan myths, the film was the product of a carefully considered transnational production process. Chapman explores the British super-spy’s origins in Ian Fleming’s snobbery-with-violence thrillers, examining the process of adaptation from page to screen. He considers Dr. No in the contexts of the UK and Hollywood film industries as well as the film’s place in relation to the changing social and cultural landscape of the 1960s, particularly Cold War anxieties and the decline of the British Empire. The book also analyzes the film’s problematic politics of gender and race and considers its cultural legacy.

    This thorough and insightful account of Dr. No will appeal to film historians and Bond fans alike.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    edited May 2022 Posts: 3,036
    Revelator wrote: »
    A new book on Dr. No is on the way from James Chapman (author of Licence to Thrill: A Cultural History of the James Bond Films):

    Dr. No: The First James Bond Film

    9780231204934.jpg?auto=format&w=350
    When Dr. No premiered at the London Pavilion on October 5, 1962, no one predicted that it would launch the longest-running series in cinema history. It introduced the James Bond formula that has been a box-office fixture ever since: sensational plots, colorful locations, beautiful women, diabolical villains, thrilling action set pieces, and a tongue-in-cheek tone. An explosive cocktail of action, spectacle, and sex, Dr. No transformed popular cinema.

    James Chapman provides a lively and comprehensive study of Dr. No, marshaling a wealth of archival research to place the film in its historical moment. He demonstrates that, contrary to many fan myths, the film was the product of a carefully considered transnational production process. Chapman explores the British super-spy’s origins in Ian Fleming’s snobbery-with-violence thrillers, examining the process of adaptation from page to screen. He considers Dr. No in the contexts of the UK and Hollywood film industries as well as the film’s place in relation to the changing social and cultural landscape of the 1960s, particularly Cold War anxieties and the decline of the British Empire. The book also analyzes the film’s problematic politics of gender and race and considers its cultural legacy.

    This thorough and insightful account of Dr. No will appeal to film historians and Bond fans alike.

    Great news! I was kind of wondering if Dr. No would receive a anniversary book in some way or another. I kind of think Tomorrow Never Dies and Skyfall deserve one as well, but that’s just me. I also wonder if we could get some books like this for FRWL, GF and TB for their 60th anniversaries.
  • Posts: 1,841
    It should be in good hands with James Chapman, but I'm curious as to how much more he's been able to uncover that hasn't already been told. The story of Fleming and the process of getting the films from page to screen has been pretty thoroughly documented countless times. Cinema Retro also did what I thought was the ultimate Dr. No tribute a decade ago for its 50th anniversary.
  • Posts: 2,673
    BT3366 wrote: »
    It should be in good hands with James Chapman, but I'm curious as to how much more he's been able to uncover that hasn't already been told. The story of Fleming and the process of getting the films from page to screen has been pretty thoroughly documented countless times. Cinema Retro also did what I thought was the ultimate Dr. No tribute a decade ago for its 50th anniversary.

    Yes, I was wondering the same thing and also have that excellent issue of Cinema Retro. FRWL might benefit more from a book-length study, but I assume that would have to wait until next year. Still, for this book it would be nice if Chapman pulls out some surprises, though I'm not sure where he'd find them.
  • SadanoyamaSadanoyama Japan
    Posts: 7
    I agree that the process of bringing Bond to the big-screen has been flogged a lot, but I think the making of Dr.No (and actually all the films) still need a decently written narrative that logically sequences the making of the film.

    The Cinema Retro mag is a great tribute but in terms of content it's all over the place. It's a collection of articles written by numerous writers which are not woven into a cohesive and most importantly chronological narrative. There are lots of great photos but it feels more like a scrapbook and that's kind of ok because it's a magazine. But I get the feeling that the Cinema Retro mag lacked an editor who could really shape all the undoubtedly fascinating nuggets of info and insight into a genuine narrative. A missed opportunity on that level.

    We need a well written history that really puts the reader into the British film industry of 1962, a time after all when all the Bond cast and crew were slowly finding their feet with no guarantee that their efforts would be a great success. A lot of risk and a wonderful payoff. The Bond films, alongside the Beatles, are one of the greatest 60s stories, and they really deserve a proper historical treatment. I hope Our Man Chapman is up to the job.
  • MI6HQMI6HQ SIS Building, London, United Kingdom
    edited May 2022 Posts: 1,879
    I've read these many times so I'm going to share these with you here.

    The 007th Minute by Jacques I.M. Stewart,
    - It features both film and novel reviews, and some philosophies regarding to the reviews.

    Then, For His Eyes Only: The Women of James Bond by Lisa Funnell.
    - It's a great discussion about the evolution of Bond Girls throughout the years, their characteristics, psychology, and personalities, not just to the Bond girls, but also to the other female characters and those who became a part of the franchise in the series like villains, singers and etc.

    Have you read these too?
  • Posts: 2,673
    I'm a member of the Commander Bond forum, where The 007th Minute originated. At the time I thought they had more to do with nitpicking than actual criticism.

    For His Eyes Only is a worthwhile contribution on the role and treatment of women in Bond. Funnell is a fan and an academic, so her treatment of the topic is critical without being hostile.
  • Posts: 2,673
    From Russia With Love joins BFI Film Classics!

    9781839024535.jpg

    From the publisher:
    Often hailed as the 'best' James Bond film, From Russia With Love (1963) is celebrated for its direction by Terence Young, memorable performances from Sean Connery in his second outing as 007, Pedro Armendáriz as Kerim, Lotte Lenya as the lesbian villain Colonel Rosa Klebb, and Robert Shaw as Red Grant, the sexually ambiguous SPECTRE assassin. And regardless of its place within the longest-running continuous film series in cinema history, it is also an outstanding example of the British spy thriller in its own right.

    Llewella Chapman's study of the iconic film pinpoints its place within the James Bond film franchise, and its significant cultural value to critics and fans as well as this film's important place within British cinema history more widely. Drawing on a broad range of archival sources, Chapman traces the film's development and production history, including its adaptation from Ian Fleming's source novel, as well as its reception and lasting impact. Chapman also considers the film's portrayal of gender politics, with its queer villains counterpoised with the heterosexual couple Bond and his Russian counterpart Tatiana Romanova, the context of Cold War politics, and the influence of Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959).
  • Posts: 1,841
    Revelator wrote: »
    From Russia With Love joins BFI Film Classics!

    9781839024535.jpg

    From the publisher:
    Often hailed as the 'best' James Bond film, From Russia With Love (1963) is celebrated for its direction by Terence Young, memorable performances from Sean Connery in his second outing as 007, Pedro Armendáriz as Kerim, Lotte Lenya as the lesbian villain Colonel Rosa Klebb, and Robert Shaw as Red Grant, the sexually ambiguous SPECTRE assassin. And regardless of its place within the longest-running continuous film series in cinema history, it is also an outstanding example of the British spy thriller in its own right.

    Llewella Chapman's study of the iconic film pinpoints its place within the James Bond film franchise, and its significant cultural value to critics and fans as well as this film's important place within British cinema history more widely. Drawing on a broad range of archival sources, Chapman traces the film's development and production history, including its adaptation from Ian Fleming's source novel, as well as its reception and lasting impact. Chapman also considers the film's portrayal of gender politics, with its queer villains counterpoised with the heterosexual couple Bond and his Russian counterpart Tatiana Romanova, the context of Cold War politics, and the influence of Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959).

    Now we're talking. FRWL seems to be the odd film out from the classic era when it comes to coverage as the others seem to have standout things about that give them more attractive stories: DN being the first; GF being the most iconic; TB having the most controversial history; YOLT the most epic; OHMSS the rediscovered classic. Now FRWL gets its due.

    I think 007 Magazine is also preparing a special FRWL issue as well.
  • SadanoyamaSadanoyama Japan
    Posts: 7
    Looks excellent. The blurb uses the plural "queer villains", surely Red Grant isn't queer, merely a good old-fashioned psychopath??
  • Posts: 2,673
    Sadanoyama wrote: »
    Looks excellent. The blurb uses the plural "queer villains", surely Red Grant isn't queer, merely a good old-fashioned psychopath??

    That's what I thought, but the blurb calls him "sexually ambiguous." I suspect this is the usual academic overreaching.
  • SadanoyamaSadanoyama Japan
    Posts: 7
    Completely agree friend. Not fussed about all that stuff but holding out hope for "a broad range of archival sources."
  • SadanoyamaSadanoyama Japan
    Posts: 7


    Good interview here with David O'Keefe and his great book on Fleming's fiendishly clever wartime gambit, "Operation Ruthless."
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,036
    BT3366 wrote: »
    Revelator wrote: »
    From Russia With Love joins BFI Film Classics!

    9781839024535.jpg

    From the publisher:
    Often hailed as the 'best' James Bond film, From Russia With Love (1963) is celebrated for its direction by Terence Young, memorable performances from Sean Connery in his second outing as 007, Pedro Armendáriz as Kerim, Lotte Lenya as the lesbian villain Colonel Rosa Klebb, and Robert Shaw as Red Grant, the sexually ambiguous SPECTRE assassin. And regardless of its place within the longest-running continuous film series in cinema history, it is also an outstanding example of the British spy thriller in its own right.

    Llewella Chapman's study of the iconic film pinpoints its place within the James Bond film franchise, and its significant cultural value to critics and fans as well as this film's important place within British cinema history more widely. Drawing on a broad range of archival sources, Chapman traces the film's development and production history, including its adaptation from Ian Fleming's source novel, as well as its reception and lasting impact. Chapman also considers the film's portrayal of gender politics, with its queer villains counterpoised with the heterosexual couple Bond and his Russian counterpart Tatiana Romanova, the context of Cold War politics, and the influence of Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959).

    Now we're talking. FRWL seems to be the odd film out from the classic era when it comes to coverage as the others seem to have standout things about that give them more attractive stories: DN being the first; GF being the most iconic; TB having the most controversial history; YOLT the most epic; OHMSS the rediscovered classic. Now FRWL gets its due.

    I think 007 Magazine is also preparing a special FRWL issue as well.

    I thought they would have done it for FRWL’s 60th anniversary next year. I’m happy either way. I hope these authors and companies do the same thing for Goldfinger for the 60th anniversary.
  • Agent_99Agent_99 enjoys a spirited ride as much as the next girl
    Posts: 2,966
    Not a book but I couldn't find a good thread for this.

    My mum sent me a link to the 'Clothes in Books' blog, which is self-explanatory. There are several posts about Bond - the blogger, like me, spent her youth reading Bond and Biggles and is humorously affectionate about both:

    http://clothesinbooks.blogspot.com/search/label/James Bond
  • Posts: 2,673
    I've encountered that blog before and very much enjoyed reading the author's posts on Fleming and Bond. Definitely recommended!
  • CharmianBondCharmianBond Pett Bottom, Kent
    edited August 2022 Posts: 397
    I tell you the book I'm really looking forward to reading is Being Bond. The Daniel Craig retrospective that was set to be released in the first week of September after it was pushed back from late-May, but now it's been pushed back again to mid-November. I guess now it doesn't take overlap with Double or Nothing and it's closer to the holiday gift-giving period but why is it taking them so long to release this? It'll be over a year since NTTD came out 😭
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,036
    I tell you the book I'm really looking forward to reading is Being Bond. The Daniel Craig retrospective that was set to be released in the first week of September after it was pushed back from late-May, but now it's been pushed back again to mid-November. I guess now it doesn't take overlap with Double or Nothing and it's closer to the holiday gift-giving period but why is it taking them so long to release this? It'll be over a year since NTTD came out 😭

    Thank you for the (somewhat) sad news. I’m looking forward to the Dr. No and From Russia With Love books as well. I’m learning that with modern James Bond releases, be thankful for what you got. It’s seems to always be a long wait.
  • Posts: 5,422
    I tell you the book I'm really looking forward to reading is Being Bond. The Daniel Craig retrospective that was set to be released in the first week of September after it was pushed back from late-May, but now it's been pushed back again to mid-November. I guess now it doesn't take overlap with Double or Nothing and it's closer to the holiday gift-giving period but why is it taking them so long to release this? It'll be over a year since NTTD came out 😭

    Am waiting on that book too! Thanks for the update! Suppose it will make a nice Christmas pressie. Just ordered my 007 calendar for 2023!
    Am currently reading 'The Making of Casino Royale' by Michael Richardson! Its highly entertaining read, and if you think the movie was chaotic.....!!
  • Posts: 1,841
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    I tell you the book I'm really looking forward to reading is Being Bond. The Daniel Craig retrospective that was set to be released in the first week of September after it was pushed back from late-May, but now it's been pushed back again to mid-November. I guess now it doesn't take overlap with Double or Nothing and it's closer to the holiday gift-giving period but why is it taking them so long to release this? It'll be over a year since NTTD came out 😭

    Thank you for the (somewhat) sad news. I’m looking forward to the Dr. No and From Russia With Love books as well. I’m learning that with modern James Bond releases, be thankful for what you got. It’s seems to always be a long wait.

    I'm looking forward to those as well. Although I about passed out when I saw the price for the Dr. No book was $110, until I saw that was just for the hardcover and the softcover is an affordable $28.

    I just hope we get some fresh details and insights and not just well-known and oft-repeated stories that have been recounted already, although there's bound to be some overlap. Chapman having done previous Bond projects gives me confidence.
  • stagstag In the thick of it!
    Posts: 1,053
    This thread has reminded me to dig out my 'Bond Movie Posters' book. It's a big glossy thing with - well - all the movie posters in it from the different markets worldwide.

    I just have to find the thing but I'm guessing it's in the loft.
  • stagstag In the thick of it!
    Posts: 1,053
    Sadanoyama wrote: »
    Looks excellent. The blurb uses the plural "queer villains", surely Red Grant isn't queer, merely a good old-fashioned psychopath??

    FYI: the term queer, as applied in the time of the Fleming novels, meant something or someone to be 'strange' or 'odd' as well as any sexual connotation.

    Like 'gay' meant happy, not what it means today.
  • CharmianBondCharmianBond Pett Bottom, Kent
    Posts: 397
    Being Bond: A Daniel Craig Retrospective

    After being slated for way back in May, it's has finally arrived. I read all of it in one sitting. It mainly focuses on the stunts but there is some discussion around the writing, and it is slightly more candid about that than I was expecting, but there's nothing especially revelatory. Similarly there aren't many images I haven't seen before but there are couple. Although Spectre's mixed reception was glossed over but Mendes does defend those controversial plot points. But overall it's a decent coffee-table book.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,036
    Being Bond: A Daniel Craig Retrospective

    After being slated for way back in May, it's has finally arrived. I read all of it in one sitting. It mainly focuses on the stunts but there is some discussion around the writing, and it is slightly more candid about that than I was expecting, but there's nothing especially revelatory. Similarly there aren't many images I haven't seen before but there are couple. Although Spectre's mixed reception was glossed over but Mendes does defend those controversial plot points. But overall it's a decent coffee-table book.

    Glad to hear your opinions. Between this book and the new Dr No and From Russia With Love books, these are what I hope to find under the Christmas tree this year.
Sign In or Register to comment.