The Film Noir Thread

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  • Posts: 15,800
    Figured I'd bring back this thread with a new top 25 ranking:

    1. OUT OF THE PAST
    2. THE BIG SLEEP (1946)
    3. THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (1946)
    4. THE MALTESE FALCON (1941)
    5. IN A LONELY PLACE
    6. DARK PASSAGE
    7. HIS KIND OF WOMAN
    8. MACAO
    9. THE BIG COMBO
    10. RAW DEAL (1948)
    11. ROAD HOUSE (1948)
    12. THE KILLERS (1946)
    13. THE BRIBE (1949)
    14. DETOUR
    15. LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
    16. LAURA
    17. JOHNNY EAGER
    18. KISS ME DEADLY
    19. MY GUN IS QUICK
    20. WHERE DANGER LIVES
    21. ANGEL FACE
    22. NIAGARA
    23. THE BIG STEAL
    24. CRISS CROSS
    25. DOUBLE INDEMNITY.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    I'll have to A/B your new list @ToTheRight to see how much things have changed. :D

    I'm going to wait until the end of the year to revise my "Essentials" list. I'll probably drop the Hitchcock titles since he is really a genre all to himself.

    Based on my weekly Noir Alley viewing, I've seen quite a few "minor" titles in the past few months - but they were all quite enjoyable.
    1. The File On Thelma Jordon (1949)
    2. Flamingo Road (1949)
    3. Dial1119 (1950)
    4. The Fallen Sparrow (1943)
    5. Between Midnight and Dawn (1950)
    6. The Verdict (1946)
    7. Flaxy Martin (1949)
    8. Deep Valley (1947)
    9. Storm Warning (1951)
    10. Impact (1949)
    11. Shockproof (1949)
    12. Julie (1956)
    13. Desperate (1947)
    14. The Secret Fury (1950)
    15. The Wrong Man (1956) - Hitchcock
    16. Out of the Fog (1941)
    17. Two O'Clock Courage (1945)
    18. Whiplash (1948)
    19. Deception (1946)
    20. The Big Caper (1957)

    So far, The File On Thelma Jordon (1949), Deep Valley (1947), Storm Warning (1951), Out of the Fog (1941) and Whiplash (1948) are on my list of future DVDs to buy. Given that November is also NOIRVEMBER (as well as Gloria Grahame's Centennial) I'll have a lot of films to rewatch. Probably between rewatches of Godzilla films!!! :))
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    I'll have to A/B your new list @ToTheRight to see how much things have changed. :D

    I'm going to wait until the end of the year to revise my "Essentials" list. I'll probably drop the Hitchcock titles since he is really a genre all to himself.

    Based on my weekly Noir Alley viewing, I've seen quite a few "minor" titles in the past few months - but they were all quite enjoyable.
    1. The File On Thelma Jordon (1949)
    2. Flamingo Road (1949)
    3. Dial1119 (1950)
    4. The Fallen Sparrow (1943)
    5. Between Midnight and Dawn (1950)
    6. The Verdict (1946)
    7. Flaxy Martin (1949)
    8. Deep Valley (1947)
    9. Storm Warning (1951)
    10. Impact (1949)
    11. Shockproof (1949)
    12. Julie (1956)
    13. Desperate (1947)
    14. The Secret Fury (1950)
    15. The Wrong Man (1956) - Hitchcock
    16. Out of the Fog (1941)
    17. Two O'Clock Courage (1945)
    18. Whiplash (1948)
    19. Deception (1946)
    20. The Big Caper (1957)

    So far, The File On Thelma Jordon (1949), Deep Valley (1947), Storm Warning (1951), Out of the Fog (1941) and Whiplash (1948) are on my list of future DVDs to buy. Given that November is also NOIRVEMBER (as well as Gloria Grahame's Centennial) I'll have a lot of films to rewatch. Probably between rewatches of Godzilla films!!! :))

    Great list, @Dwayne. I really like Storm Warning, Impact, Dial 1119 and Desparate. Several titles on that list I still haven't seen. :)
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    It appears that Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in the US, is devoting Tuesday nights in November to Gloria Grahame.

    The Schedule (thus far):

    Nov 7th/Nov 8th
    8:00 pm Crossfire (1947)
    9:45 pm Woman's Secret (1949)
    11:30 pm Roughshod (1949)
    1:15 am Blonde Fever (1945)
    2:30 am Merton of the Movies (1947)
    4:00 am Song of the Thin Man (1947)
    5:30 am It Happened in Brooklyn (1947)

    Nov 14th/Nov 15th
    8:00 pm In a Lonely Place (1950)
    10:00 pm The Glass Wall (1953)
    11:30 pm Man on a Tightrope (1953)
    1:30 am Macao (1952)

    Nov 21st/Nov 22nd
    8:00 pm The Bad and the Beautiful (1952)
    10:15 pm Odds Against Tomorrow (1959)
    12:00 am Not As a Stranger (1955)
    2:30 am The Cobweb (1955)

    grahame-1600x900-c-default.jpg
    :x :x :x
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    It appears that Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in the US, is devoting Tuesday nights in November to Gloria Grahame.

    The Schedule (thus far):

    Nov 7th/Nov 8th
    8:00 pm Crossfire (1947)
    9:45 pm Woman's Secret (1949)
    11:30 pm Roughshod (1949)
    1:15 am Blonde Fever (1945)
    2:30 am Merton of the Movies (1947)
    4:00 am Song of the Thin Man (1947)
    5:30 am It Happened in Brooklyn (1947)

    Nov 14th/Nov 15th
    8:00 pm In a Lonely Place (1950)
    10:00 pm The Glass Wall (1953)
    11:30 pm Man on a Tightrope (1953)
    1:30 am Macao (1952)

    Nov 21st/Nov 22nd
    8:00 pm The Bad and the Beautiful (1952)
    10:15 pm Odds Against Tomorrow (1959)
    12:00 am Not As a Stranger (1955)
    2:30 am The Cobweb (1955)

    grahame-1600x900-c-default.jpg
    :x :x :x

    Excellent, @Dwayne . Gloria must be TCM's star of the month.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    edited November 2023 Posts: 2,617
    To complete the TCM (Turner Classic Movie) schedule of Gloria Grahame films:

    Nov 28th/29th
    8:00 pm The Big Heat (1953)
    9:45 pm Human Desire (1954)
    11:30 pm Naked Alibi (1954)
    1:15 am The Good Die Young (1954) [directed by Lewis Gilbert]
    3:15 am Chilly Scenes of Winter (1979)
    zanshinart-tumblr.jpg?w=584
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    Since you mentioned TENSION (1949) and it is November 1 (The annual start of Noirvember) I thought @ToTheRight would like to see Ms. Totter telling this "poor penniless sap" to bug off (or "drift" as she puts it). :))

  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    Since you mentioned TENSION (1949) and it is November 1 (The annual start of Noirvember) I thought @ToTheRight would like to see Ms. Totter telling this "poor penniless sap" to bug off (or "drift" as she puts it). :))


    Such a great scene! Love this movie. :D
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    @ToTheRight,

    FYI: on X (Twitter), #NoirvemberChallenge is holding a daily series of Film Noir questions. One for each of the thirty days of this month. Listed below are the tweeter questions for Nov 1st to Nov 10th.
    1. Favorite Character Introduction?
    2. Film that made you a Film Noir Fan?
    3. Recast a Film Noir with current actors
    4. Film Noir that you would show to a newbie?
    5. Film Noir that references another Film Noir?
    6. Favorite Film Noir Gambling Scene?
    7. Film Noir that you Watch the Most?
    8. Favorite Film Noir Director?
    9. Favorite Film Noir with “Big” in the Title?
    10. Favorite Film Noir Cinematographer?

    My choices thus far (Day 1,2,4 and 9 only):

    Harry Lime (Orson Welles) in THE THIRD MAN. This is still the standard IMO. It is Interesting to compare this with how Sean Bean’s Alex Trevelyan steps out of the shadows in GOLDENEYE.

    THE BREAKING POINT (1950). I’ve written about this classic on several occasions. John Garfield is simply one of the greatest actors that most people don’t know about.

    OUT OF THE PAST. I could have selected DOUBLE INDEMINITY, but I think that historical “B-movie ‘ness” of Film Noir is really captured by OUT OF THE PAST. DOUBLE INDEMNITY, on the other hand, was really an “A” movie. That said, given the amount of talent shown in a lot of film noirs I beginning to think of then not as B-movies, but simply as “non-A” films.

    THE BIG HEAT (1953). While I love THE BIG COMBO and THE BIG SLEEP, Gloria Grahame’s Debby Marsh really makes this film especially exciting.

    While I can't find the specific tweet at the moment, one poster suggested Bond's own Mads Mikkelsen in a remake of IN A LONELY PLACE. You know something... I'm really starting to see that. It would be tough to follow Bogart, but perhaps he could pull it off.
    85363_v9_bc.jpg

    This Saturday (Day 11) will be loads of fun, since everyone is tasked with selecting their favorite femme fatale. Thoughts?
  • edited November 2023 Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    @ToTheRight,

    FYI: on X (Twitter), #NoirvemberChallenge is holding a daily series of Film Noir questions. One for each of the thirty days of this month. Listed below are the tweeter questions for Nov 1st to Nov 10th.
    1. Favorite Character Introduction?
    2. Film that made you a Film Noir Fan?
    3. Recast a Film Noir with current actors
    4. Film Noir that you would show to a newbie?
    5. Film Noir that references another Film Noir?
    6. Favorite Film Noir Gambling Scene?
    7. Film Noir that you Watch the Most?
    8. Favorite Film Noir Director?
    9. Favorite Film Noir with “Big” in the Title?
    10. Favorite Film Noir Cinematographer?

    My choices thus far (Day 1,2,4 and 9 only):

    Harry Lime (Orson Welles) in THE THIRD MAN. This is still the standard IMO. It is Interesting to compare this with how Sean Bean’s Alex Trevelyan steps out of the shadows in GOLDENEYE.

    THE BREAKING POINT (1950). I’ve written about this classic on several occasions. John Garfield is simply one of the greatest actors that most people don’t know about.

    OUT OF THE PAST. I could have selected DOUBLE INDEMINITY, but I think that historical “B-movie ‘ness” of Film Noir is really captured by OUT OF THE PAST. DOUBLE INDEMNITY, on the other hand, was really an “A” movie. That said, given the amount of talent shown in a lot of film noirs I beginning to think of then not as B-movies, but simply as “non-A” films.

    THE BIG HEAT (1953). While I love THE BIG COMBO and THE BIG SLEEP, Gloria Grahame’s Debby Marsh really makes this film especially exciting.

    While I can't find the specific tweet at the moment, one John Alton. suggested Bond's own Mads Mikkelsen in a remake of IN A LONELY PLACE. You know something... I'm really starting to see that. It would be tough to follow Bogart, but perhaps he could pull it off.
    85363_v9_bc.jpg

    This Saturday (Day 11) will be loads of fun, since everyone is tasked with selecting their favorite femme fatale. Thoughts?

    That sounds like a blast @Dwayne ! Of course my personal fave noir femme fatale is............

    z860qyxrydl81.jpg

    Too bad I gotta work all day Saturday and I dont have Twitter.

    I'll try and answer these questions:

    1. Cora Smith
    2. THE MALTESE FALCON
    3. Remake of ON DANGEROUS GROUND with Gal Gadot in the Ida Lupino role and Liam Neeson in the Robert Ryan role. Bit if a cop out answer, but I can't think of too many actors today that are noirish.

    4. OUT OF THE PAST
    5. MY GUN IS QUICK slightly references THE MALTESE FALCON in the final scene.
    6. Mitchum helping the kid beat Jim Backus in HIS KIND OF WOMAN may be my fave gambling scene.
    7. OUT OF THE PAST and THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE
    8. Between John Huston, Anthony Mann and Robert Siodmak.
    9. THE BIG SLEEP
    10. John Alton.


  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    @ToTheRight - Excellent responses, and you make a good point about current actors not necessarily being "noirish." Which is why, I refrained from offering up any suggestions on that question.

    As for my favorite femme fatale; I'm going to have to sleep on it! :D

    I actually joined twitter several months ago, specifically to tweet along with #TCMParty. So far, so good. But outside of the confines on classic filmdom, twitter can be an absolute cesspool and I avoid it at all costs.
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    @ToTheRight - Excellent responses, and you make a good point about current actors not necessarily being "noirish." Which is why, I refrained from offering up any suggestions on that question.

    As for my favorite femme fatale; I'm going to have to sleep on it! :D

    I actually joined twitter several months ago, specifically to tweet along with #TCMParty. So far, so good. But outside of the confines on classic filmdom, twitter can be an absolute cesspool and I avoid it at all costs.

    I suppose there are actors today who could be in noir....but for me even those actors were, say 20 years ago. Robert Patrick, for instance, I could see in a Robert Ryan type role back in the 90s or 2000s.

    Yeah. I had a Twitter account at one point, @Dwayne, but I somehow locked myself out.
    I tend to get hacked on Instagram. Word of advice: avoid responding to messages sent by Instagram followers you don't really know.........especially femme fatale followers. :(
    Speaking of femme fatales, my follow up choices would be Jane Greer in OUT OF THE PAST, Ava Gardner in THE KILLERS and Gene Tierney in LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    FYI,
    The Noirvember Challenges for Days 11 to 20.
    1. Favorite Film Noir Femme Fatale
    2. Favorite Dane Clark Film Noir
    3. Favorite Film Noir where Location Is a Character
    4. Sexiest Film Noir
    5. Favorite Dana Andrews Film Noir
    6. Favorite Line in a Film Noir
    7. Favorite Ensemble Cast in a Film Noir
    8. Favorite Barbara Stanwyck Film Noir
    9. Favorite Film Noir Featuring a Cop
    10. Favorite Film Noir Actors who Never Starred Together

    For the record, choosing a single favorite femme fatale proved to be impossible for many, though Stanwyck was cited by most people.



    While excluding Barbara Stanwyck – the gold standard IMO - my post cited Jane Greer (OUT OF THE PAST), Gene Tierney (LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN), Joan Bennett (SCARLETT STREET) and – naturally – Peggy Cummins (GUN CRAZY).

    Mary Astor as Brigid O'Shaughnessy (THE MALTESE FALCON, 1941), Jean Gillie as Margot Shelby (DECOY, 1946) – bring on the Methylene blue(!) as she’s perhaps the most ruthless fatale – Ava Gardner as Kitty Collins (THE KILLERS, 1946) and Lizabeth Scott as Jane Palmer (TOO LATE FOR TEARS, 1949), would have been a more diverse selection. But what is done, is done.

    However, I don’t think anyone has ever been as “Fatale” as Ann Savage / Vera in DETOUR (1945).
    6b12dff906f5b87a33a2bd17d9ca76218fdfb100.gif

    She scares me!
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    FYI,
    The Noirvember Challenges for Days 11 to 20.
    1. Favorite Film Noir Femme Fatale
    2. Favorite Dane Clark Film Noir
    3. Favorite Film Noir where Location Is a Character
    4. Sexiest Film Noir
    5. Favorite Dana Andrews Film Noir
    6. Favorite Line in a Film Noir
    7. Favorite Ensemble Cast in a Film Noir
    8. Favorite Barbara Stanwyck Film Noir
    9. Favorite Film Noir Featuring a Cop
    10. Favorite Film Noir Actors who Never Starred Together

    For the record, choosing a single favorite femme fatale proved to be impossible for many, though Stanwyck was cited by most people.



    While excluding Barbara Stanwyck – the gold standard IMO - my post cited Jane Greer (OUT OF THE PAST), Gene Tierney (LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN), Joan Bennett (SCARLETT STREET) and – naturally – Peggy Cummins (GUN CRAZY).

    Mary Astor as Brigid O'Shaughnessy (THE MALTESE FALCON, 1941), Jean Gillie as Margot Shelby (DECOY, 1946) – bring on the Methylene blue(!) as she’s perhaps the most ruthless fatale – Ava Gardner as Kitty Collins (THE KILLERS, 1946) and Lizabeth Scott as Jane Palmer (TOO LATE FOR TEARS, 1949), would have been a more diverse selection. But what is done, is done.

    However, I don’t think anyone has ever been as “Fatale” as Ann Savage / Vera in DETOUR (1945).
    6b12dff906f5b87a33a2bd17d9ca76218fdfb100.gif

    She scares me!

    Okay, here's my answers:

    1. Cora Smith
    2. MOONRISE
    3. DARK PASSAGE
    4. OUT OF THE PAST ans THE POSTMAN ALWAY RINGS TWICE
    5. WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS
    6. "When you're slapped, you'll take it and like it."-THE MALTESE FALCON
    7. THE MALTESE FALCON
    8. DOUBLE INDEMNITY
    9. ON DANGEROUS GROUND
    10. Robert Mitchum and Lana Turner.
  • FeyadorFeyador Montreal, Canada
    edited November 2023 Posts: 735
    The problem with Ann Savage:

    She's too much 'fatale' and not much 'femme' ... when what's required is an equal amount of both.

    At least to my taste in noir ...

    Similarly, Mary Astor in TMF is just too uncool, nervous from the start, and lacks the va-va-voom to convincingly enthrall & ensnarl any male of the species.

    I come second to no one in my love of Gloria Grahame in The Big Heat, but she's really far too sympathetic & vulnerable a character to be a true femme fatale. Kind of the opposite of Ann Savage ... notwithstanding the revenge she enacts at the end.

    To my eyes, from examples mentioned above, it's hard to top Jane Greer. Honorable mentions to Ava and Joan ...
  • Tightrope is a noir. Death Wish is not.


    Put Jack Nicholson in Tightrope and it is a noir as it can be.
  • edited November 2023 Posts: 15,800
    So I got a copy of I WALK ALONE, the first pairing of Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas.
    Hadn't seen this noir in decades and it really hit the spot. Great cast, great atmosphere and excellent music score. I loved every frame.

    MV5BNDQ2ZWE4ZjgtYmY4Yy00YmIzLThhNDctMTA4ODAzNTZlOGRlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMDI2NDg0NQ@@._V1_.jpg

    walk.jpeg

    MV5BNjQ1N2YzOWEtMDIyYy00N2Y3LWEwN2MtZDY1OTBkY2U0ZTM4XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjc2OTM5MTU@._V1_.jpg

    MV5BNGQ1ZWVhODMtMmM3Yy00NGYwLWFkOGUtNjg3ZTlmYTVhM2E1XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTU4NzQ5ODQy._V1_.jpg

    MV5BYjBjYWU1NzAtY2Q1Yi00M2Y3LWJiNDYtNjJlNDliNTc3NzEwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMTU4NzQ5ODQy._V1_.jpg

    tumblr_pix9vajOWF1qmemvwo3_1280.jpg

  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    @ToTheRight. And there's my girl ... Lizabeth Scott :x :x So I'll have to add this to my watch list, although I've always read that Lancaster and Scott didn't really get along on set. But still .... :x :x
    c1cb8dea02b918bf57fd655bce7a50f0a6046a25.gif

    In other Noir "news", the questions for days 21-30:
    1. Coolest Film Noir Character
    2. Favorite Film Noir MacGuffin
    3. Favorite Audrey Totter Film Noir
    4. Favorite Film Noir in a Language Other Than English
    5. Favorite John Garfield Film Noir
    6. Favorite Film Noir Duo
    7. Favorite NeoNoir made after 1970
    8. Film Noir Character you Love to Hate
    9. Favorite Poverty Row Film Noir
    10. Favorite Ending in a Film Noir

    Finally, yesterday, November 19th, I saw that Gene Tierney was trending on twitter. It had slipped my mind, but yesterday marked the 103rd anniversary of her birth. Clearly, one of the most beautiful women ever, I’m going to watch LAURA tonight in her honor.
    Shutterstock_5874458b.jpg
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    @ToTheRight. And there's my girl ... Lizabeth Scott :x :x So I'll have to add this to my watch list, although I've always read that Lancaster and Scott didn't really get along on set. But still .... :x :x
    c1cb8dea02b918bf57fd655bce7a50f0a6046a25.gif

    In other Noir "news", the questions for days 21-30:
    1. Coolest Film Noir Character
    2. Favorite Film Noir MacGuffin
    3. Favorite Audrey Totter Film Noir
    4. Favorite Film Noir in a Language Other Than English
    5. Favorite John Garfield Film Noir
    6. Favorite Film Noir Duo
    7. Favorite NeoNoir made after 1970
    8. Film Noir Character you Love to Hate
    9. Favorite Poverty Row Film Noir
    10. Favorite Ending in a Film Noir

    Finally, yesterday, November 19th, I saw that Gene Tierney was trending on twitter. It had slipped my mind, but yesterday marked the 103rd anniversary of her birth. Clearly, one of the most beautiful women ever, I’m going to watch LAURA tonight in her honor.
    Shutterstock_5874458b.jpg

    I think you'd like I WALK ALONE, @Dwayne. Lizabeth Scott has a great role.
    Last night I popped in my copy of LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN in honor of Gene Tierney's birthday.
  • edited November 2023 Posts: 15,800
    I need another ranking as I've been diving deep into Noirvember. There's a few different titles in here:

    1. THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE
    2. THE BIG SLEEP
    3. OUT OF THE PAST
    4. THE MALTESE FALCON
    5. WHITE HEAT
    6. IN A LONELY PLACE
    7. DARK PASSAGE
    8. HIS KIND OF WOMAN
    9. LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
    10. DETOUR
    11. ON DANGEROUS GROUND
    12. MACAO
    13. I WALK ALONE
    14. JOHNNY EAGER
    15. THE BRIBE (1949)
    16. LAURA
    17. THE KILLERS (1946)
    18. CRISS CROSS
    19. RAW DEAL (1948)
    20. ROAD HOUSE (1948)
    21. PORTRAIT IN BLACK
    22. DOUBLE INDEMNITY
    23. KEY LARGO
    24. MY GUN IS QUICK
    25. THE BIG COMBO
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    An interesting update @ToTheRight. MACAO was on TCM last weekend, but I didn't get a chance to see it.
    275px-Macao_%28film%29_1952._Josef_von_Sternberg%2C_Nicholas_Ray%2C_directors_-_L_to_R_Robert_Mitchum%2C_Gloria_Grahame.jpg

    I also didn't get a chance to watch LAURA. Fate has intervened, however, and the #FilmNoirClub is having a virtual watch along tonight.
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    An interesting update @ToTheRight. MACAO was on TCM last weekend, but I didn't get a chance to see it.
    275px-Macao_%28film%29_1952._Josef_von_Sternberg%2C_Nicholas_Ray%2C_directors_-_L_to_R_Robert_Mitchum%2C_Gloria_Grahame.jpg

    I also didn't get a chance to watch LAURA. Fate has intervened, however, and the #FilmNoirClub is having a virtual watch along tonight.
    Thanks, @Dwayne! MACAO is great. One of my favorite Mitchum noirs.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    edited November 2023 Posts: 2,617
    The Thanksgiving Day NFL games today are really boring. So, I’ve decided to start revising my “Essential Noir” list. And while I was doing that I came across this fairly old documentary on YouTube.

    American Cinema - Film Noir (PBS documentary)


    And "Noirvember" creator Marya E. Gates did the introduction to this article of the best 100 noirs. An excellent read.

    https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/guide/best-film-noirs/
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    The Thanksgiving Day NFL games today are really boring. So, I’ve decided to start revising my “Essential Noir” list. And while I was doing that I came across this fairly old documentary on YouTube.

    American Cinema - Film Noir (PBS documentary)

    Always loving your posts and love for noir, @Dwayne. Happy Thanksgiving!
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    A short overview of Gloria Grahame's career in film noir.


    Currently watching HUMAN DESIRE on TCM.
    Screenshot%20(1692).png


  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    A short overview of Gloria Grahame's career in film noir.


    Currently watching HUMAN DESIRE on TCM.
    Screenshot%20(1692).png


    I like that Youtuber's noir videos.
    Yesterday I received THE TWO MRS CARROLLS in the mail and watched it back to back with CONFLICT. Great Bogie double feature. I'm actually more familiar with CONFLICT, but I really enjoyed both films. Very similar noirs Bogie did that don't get much discussion.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    FYI,
    In April, the criterion channel is highlighting the noir films of 1950 in a series they call “Peak Noir.” Among the films being streamed:
    1. IN A LONELY PLACE
    2. SUNSET BLVD
    3. THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
    4. NIGHT and the CITY
    5. GUN CRAZY
    6. THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON
    7. CAGED
    8. THE BREAKING POINT
    9. THE DAMNED DON’T CRY
    10. WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS
    In addition, there is a thirty-minute overview of the series by Eddie Muller and Imogen Sara Smith in which they outline why 1950 was just a pivotal year for classic film noir. As Eddie states:

    “Of course, crime pays! Haven’t you been living in this country for a while?!”



    I think @ToTheRight can guess which movie I streamed first! :x :x :x
    guncrazy2.jpeg
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    FYI,
    In April, the criterion channel is highlighting the noir films of 1950 in a series they call “Peak Noir.” Among the films being streamed:
    1. IN A LONELY PLACE
    2. SUNSET BLVD
    3. THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
    4. NIGHT and the CITY
    5. GUN CRAZY
    6. THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON
    7. CAGED
    8. THE BREAKING POINT
    9. THE DAMNED DON’T CRY
    10. WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS
    In addition, there is a thirty-minute overview of the series by Eddie Muller and Imogen Sara Smith in which they outline why 1950 was just a pivotal year for classic film noir. As Eddie states:

    “Of course, crime pays! Haven’t you been living in this country for a while?!”



    I think @ToTheRight can guess which movie I streamed first! :x :x :x
    guncrazy2.jpeg

    Excellent!
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 2,617
    I'm sure @ToTheRight will find this interesting! :D



    FYI, on Wednesday evening I participated in a live-tweet of the 1931 version of "THE MALTESE FALCON." For now, I'll just say, that it was much better than I anticipated, and the "pre-code" aspects of the film were really nice.
  • Posts: 15,800
    Dwayne wrote: »
    I'm sure @ToTheRight will find this interesting! :D



    FYI, on Wednesday evening I participated in a live-tweet of the 1931 version of "THE MALTESE FALCON." For now, I'll just say, that it was much better than I anticipated, and the "pre-code" aspects of the film were really nice.

    YES!
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