Share your story ideas for BOND 26

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  • TheSkyfallen06TheSkyfallen06 Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Posts: 969
    echo wrote: »
    I think they can do a relatively low-key (and largely UK-based, so less expensive the first go-round) MR adaptation. It will have been at least 15 years since the last UK-based one, SF.

    I think that's what they will do next.

    If they ever do a proper-novel adaptation of MR, then there's no way they're gonna reuse that title again, it's more likely they would adapt the novel, but using the title RISICO.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited October 2022 Posts: 2,860
    Would love to see a more authentic MR adaptation. Might not be enough of a spectacle to launch a new Bond, but for the third in a four-film run? That'd be the right point for him not to get the girl, too.
  • edited October 2022 Posts: 2,564
    MR is a hard novel to adapt in all fairness. In Bond terms much of it has either already been done or become too cliched. The sense of mystery in the book wouldn't quite translate for the big screen given it'd be relatively obvious to most viewers early on that the Drax character is in fact the villain. Heck, I think just the idea of the guy being a rich philanthropist in a Bond film would set off alarm bells. The idea of the Moonraker rocket would have to be completely different. It'd need a lot of adapting, to the point where key ideas would be changed.

    I do think Bond 26 will be a relatively original plot, but one with ideas adapted from the Fleming novels. I mean, there are some cool things from MR that they can work with. A spin on the Bridge game has perhaps been done too many times in the series though. Same for a villain lying about their origins/posing as a rich philanthropist. That said I've always loved images like Drax's team of scientists all having identical moustaches/shaved heads. There's a sort of creepiness to it. A spin on the blowtorch torture with Bond purposely aggravating the villain in some way to escape can be incorporated. Same for the cliff explosion. Perhaps even the idea of a suicide/a villain's employee having a mental breakdown setting off Bond's involvement etc.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    edited October 2022 Posts: 5,867
    007HallY wrote: »
    MR is a hard novel to adapt in all fairness. In Bond terms much of it has either already been done or become too cliched. The sense of mystery in the book wouldn't quite translate for the big screen given it'd be relatively obvious to most viewers early on that the Drax character is in fact the villain. Heck, I think just the idea of the guy being a rich philanthropist in a Bond film would set off alarm bells. The idea of the Moonraker rocket would have to be completely different. It'd need a lot of adapting, to the point where key ideas would be changed.

    I do think Bond 26 will be a relatively original plot, but one with ideas adapted from the Fleming novels. I mean, there are some cool things from MR that they can work with. A spin on the Bridge game has perhaps been done too many times in the series though. Same for a villain lying about their origins/posing as a rich philanthropist. That said I've always loved images like Drax's team of scientists all having identical moustaches/shaved heads. There's a sort of creepiness to it. A spin on the blowtorch torture with Bond purposely aggravating the villain in some way to escape can be incorporated. Same for the cliff explosion. Perhaps even the idea of a suicide/a villain's employee having a mental breakdown setting off Bond's involvement etc.

    It'll be hard to top the backgammon game in OP. That took the best elements of the MR bridge game.

    Identical moustaches/shaved heads was in TWINE.
    Blowtorch was OP (again!) and DAD PTS.
    Cliff explosion was the (white) glacier surfing in DAD.

    I think MR may be the most adapted novel, but paradoxically the least faithfully adapted one!
  • edited October 2022 Posts: 2,564
    echo wrote: »
    007HallY wrote: »
    MR is a hard novel to adapt in all fairness. In Bond terms much of it has either already been done or become too cliched. The sense of mystery in the book wouldn't quite translate for the big screen given it'd be relatively obvious to most viewers early on that the Drax character is in fact the villain. Heck, I think just the idea of the guy being a rich philanthropist in a Bond film would set off alarm bells. The idea of the Moonraker rocket would have to be completely different. It'd need a lot of adapting, to the point where key ideas would be changed.

    I do think Bond 26 will be a relatively original plot, but one with ideas adapted from the Fleming novels. I mean, there are some cool things from MR that they can work with. A spin on the Bridge game has perhaps been done too many times in the series though. Same for a villain lying about their origins/posing as a rich philanthropist. That said I've always loved images like Drax's team of scientists all having identical moustaches/shaved heads. There's a sort of creepiness to it. A spin on the blowtorch torture with Bond purposely aggravating the villain in some way to escape can be incorporated. Same for the cliff explosion. Perhaps even the idea of a suicide/a villain's employee having a mental breakdown setting off Bond's involvement etc.

    It'll be hard to top the backgammon game in OP. That took the best elements of the MR bridge game.

    Identical moustaches/shaved heads was in TWINE.
    Blowtorch was OP (again!) and DAD PTS.
    Cliff explosion was the (white) glacier surfing in DAD.

    I think MR may be the most adapted novel, but paradoxically the least faithfully adapted one!

    I can't remember the shaved heads/moustaches in TWINE. Maybe The rest is there I guess loosely, but there's still elements they can adapt in different contexts, lines they can use etc.

    Yes, I agree, it's a novel they've never adapted faithfully and yet have taken lots of pieces from. There's still much there though. Bond's day to day working life is an interesting element (we never get to see this in the films, same for a character like Loleila Ponsonby who I feel is more interesting than any iteration of Moneypenny), the little insights into his relationship with M under certain circumstances (ie. M asking him to do him a favour and calling him 'James' as opposed to Bond which is something I feel can be used). It's a rich novel certainly for material, and I'm sure we'll see elements of it in future Bond movies.
  • Posts: 234
    Bond vs Russia seems appropriate.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11289623/Hes-not-joking-Biden-warns-Putin-deadly-using-tactical-NUKES-Ukraine.html

    Genuinely crazy times were living through. Assuming we don't get destroyed before Bond 26 is made (!).... maybe an Octopussy type plot would reflect the times.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,517
    It’s important to remember that Bond never really goes up against a country… they’ve so far avoided being too political in that way. Octopussy is actually a great example because it illustrates that Bond always goes up a single crazy individual (or organization) that explicitly does *not* reflect the aims of the country. Smersh is a grey area because they were a very governmental organization, but generally, the Bond films seem to avoid being too political by not strictly saying “the villain in this film is Russia”.

    If they wanted to be topical they could create a Putin-type villain, but I highly doubt they’d make that character the dictator of Russia.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 7,517
    FRWL is probably an obvious counterpoint, but in the novel the villain Grant was like a psycho werewolfesque murder fetishizer. Again, SMERSH was a governmental organization like MI6, so it brushed up against Russia being the villain, but never goes so far as to explicitly make the country the villain.
  • Posts: 2,564
    The Bond films have always tended to avoid politics in this way, and in recent years the villains have become especially 'neutral' from a nationality perspective. I mean, we've had a former MI6 agent who seems to be Spanish (which is never really explained) and a character with the name 'Lystifer Safin' (his real name shockingly) with one of the most generic European accents I have ever heard in a film. I don't think we'll see Bond going to Russia anytime soon, nor will a Russian villain make an appearance.

    Personally, I find the weird psycho werewolf murderer a much more interesting concept to adapt for a film.
  • Posts: 4,597
    I do like the idea of the villain targeting the undersea data cable network. IMHO, it combines traditional Bond themes with a new, unexplored target. It also offers options re sea going scenes/stunts which surely we are overdue?

  • edited October 2022 Posts: 234
    patb wrote: »
    I do like the idea of the villain targeting the undersea data cable network. IMHO, it combines traditional Bond themes with a new, unexplored target. It also offers options re sea going scenes/stunts which surely we are overdue?
    I like your idea. :) You could have the dark web - the villain trading weapons to terrorists to target the worldwide digital network - as a subplot.

    The plot can be over the top with a Stromberg type sea lair or more realistic. Sea battles with ships or mini subs! Or sea drones! And deadly sharks!🦈



  • Posts: 4,597
    It does provide options - I was also thinking that, linked to this, a high tech version of "The Sting" where a global trader could gain microseconds in trading stocks/currency by disrupting existing international data networks. One of the key issues with modern writing re hi tech is that you cant see the data (SF suffered slightly from this - big leap for the viewer from hacking to blowing up HQ) but the concept of a huge, under sea data cable is easy for the audience to relate to - we have all had issues with dodgy cables - this is the same priciple but on a huge scale so I think viewers could easily relate to basic concept.

  • edited October 2022 Posts: 234
    I would like to see a more sci-fi emphasis in the next Bond actor era. It doesn't have to be parallel dimensions (lol) but AI robots, advanced AI drones, the dark web, driverless tactical weapons based vehicles etc, some sci fi variation on a virus, the UK having left the EU has its own space agency and plans to send probes to Mars and the villain sabotages them.

    NTTD did go that route with nanobot technology - but you could go further in future films. I don't mind more realistic Bond films too. Maybe a mix of both styles is worth considering for future films.



  • edited October 2022 Posts: 4,597
    It's great for us Sci-fi fans but how many of jo public understand what AI is? or the dark web? or nonobots? I think IMHO , it has to be more grounded. Having said that, the privatisation of space travel does provide possible options.
  • edited October 2022 Posts: 2,564
    The problem with leaning too heavily into technology for a villain's scheme is that it's tricky to sell that sense of high stakes without drifting into nanobots or the downright implausible. SP tried to keep things grounded but relevant with the Nine Eyes Programme, but even with the fact that it makes the 00 section null and void it doesn't feel like it's overly threatening... might be because surveillance is something we're used to in our modern world, or it might be because we don't actually see any real world consequence of this technology... I mean, they tried to raise the tension by having a countdown that they have to stop, but it feels a bit strange given it's a programme and can just be switched off once it goes up.

    In that sense I think SF integrated the cyberterrorist aspect to a more effective degree, and Silva's ultimate plan has more weight to it. I mean, we could have a future villain doing something dastardly with cryptocurrency, AI technology or manipulating stock trades, but it needs to be in aid of something bigger.
  • Posts: 4,597
    yes, agree, it's tricky, need high stakes and, now, seemingly, emotionaly stakes also
  • Jordo007Jordo007 Merseyside
    Posts: 2,412
    I really don't envy them coming up with threats in this climate. A step one way and its judged self parody, a step the other way and judged too real.

    I'd love Bond 26 to be grounded again, some of the more sci-fi elements of NTTD felt out of place in the Craig era

    I'd also love them to cast a lesser known actor as the villain again, that way it's more unpredictable and you're not slave to the actors schedule.
  • edited October 2022 Posts: 2,564
    patb wrote: »
    yes, agree, it's tricky, need high stakes and, now, seemingly, emotionaly stakes also

    I think the villains should have some sort of motive that is clear and reasonably informs what they do, and that the scheme itself feels appropriately high stakes, especially for Bond. The motive doesn't need to be revenge as per GE, SF and NTTD, but this does work. Hell, a villain like Elliot Carver just wants to be the best media mogul in the world and will play God to achieve this, that's all you need really. It's far more understandable than a character like Safin who in one half of the film wants revenge, and once that plot line is resolved completely changes his motive to world domination for some reason... The plan doesn't have to be world domination or a 'ticking clock' thing either, but again it has to be impactful, and as per SF a low key plot built around trying to destroy a single person and what they stands for works well, especially given that it hits close to home for Bond.

    So yes, by all means have AI, drones, some cool driverless cars etc in future Bond films. After all it somewhat reflects the world we currently live in. But I think the above rules apply.
  • Posts: 4,597
    It's a huge challenge for the writer - the motivation of the villain - MI are stuggling with this also and we see it in other franchises. I think they need to start with this as the foundation. As we have seen with prvious efforts - you really do need a well constructed character as the villain - the foundation of the movie.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 3,963
    "The real trick of it is to find the villain's caper. Once you've got that, you're off to the races and the rest is fun." - Richard Maibaum.
  • edited October 2022 Posts: 2,564
    patb wrote: »
    It's a huge challenge for the writer - the motivation of the villain - MI are stuggling with this also and we see it in other franchises. I think they need to start with this as the foundation. As we have seen with prvious efforts - you really do need a well constructed character as the villain - the foundation of the movie.

    I get that. I think as much as people groan about the 'personal' elements of Bond and other franchise films nowadays, it's understandable that this is something writers lean on. I mean, you have a film like The Batman which did a very similar thing with its villain to NTTD - that's to say give them a sympathetic backstory where they've been 'wronged' in some way and want revenge. It's silly if you read it on paper (actually sillier than Safin's actions during the first half of NTTD in a way), especially with the required plot contrivances/convolutions, but people go with it because it's easy to understand and work with. So long as you keep this motive throughout - again, Safin's character falls apart in NTTD once he destroys SPECTRE and hence has to be given another scheme and in turn motive altogether. It becomes confusing.

    It's why I find the Craig era Blofeld so frustrating. He has no motive when it comes to his actual scheme in SP. His fixation with Bond/the murder of his father is separate from his criminal enterprise, which is just something he randomly does. Even the Blofeld of the early films wanted money.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 5,867
    007HallY wrote: »
    The problem with leaning too heavily into technology for a villain's scheme is that it's tricky to sell that sense of high stakes without drifting into nanobots or the downright implausible. SP tried to keep things grounded but relevant with the Nine Eyes Programme, but even with the fact that it makes the 00 section null and void it doesn't feel like it's overly threatening... might be because surveillance is something we're used to in our modern world, or it might be because we don't actually see any real world consequence of this technology... I mean, they tried to raise the tension by having a countdown that they have to stop, but it feels a bit strange given it's a programme and can just be switched off once it goes up.

    In that sense I think SF integrated the cyberterrorist aspect to a more effective degree, and Silva's ultimate plan has more weight to it. I mean, we could have a future villain doing something dastardly with cryptocurrency, AI technology or manipulating stock trades, but it needs to be in aid of something bigger.

    Yes, agreed about SP.

    Nine Eyes showed some promise as a villainous scheme but the movie needed that final dastardly twist.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe "I tolerate this century, but I don't enjoy it."Moderator
    Posts: 13,845
    echo wrote: »
    I think they can do a relatively low-key (and largely UK-based, so less expensive the first go-round) MR adaptation. It will have been at least 15 years since the last UK-based one, SF.

    I think that's what they will do next.

    I'd actually really like to see this. Strip it back, and use MR, just re-title it, update Drax's backstory, and update the Moonraker itself. Keep everything else the the same as the book.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 5,867
    I don't see how they do bridge (and the way Bond wins) and make it cinematic. Maybe.

    Or maybe roulette? Canasta?

    They got lucky with CR because poker was in the zeitgeist.

    And the backgammon in OP is great because it's an appropriately "clubby" sport.

    (People get caught up in the Tarzan yell and clown suit but OP does have one of the better-written scripts, at least on a scene by scene basis.)
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 1,350
    007HallY wrote: »
    The problem with leaning too heavily into technology for a villain's scheme is that it's tricky to sell that sense of high stakes without drifting into nanobots or the downright implausible. SP tried to keep things grounded but relevant with the Nine Eyes Programme, but even with the fact that it makes the 00 section null and void it doesn't feel like it's overly threatening... might be because surveillance is something we're used to in our modern world, or it might be because we don't actually see any real world consequence of this technology... I mean, they tried to raise the tension by having a countdown that they have to stop, but it feels a bit strange given it's a programme and can just be switched off once it goes up.

    In that sense I think SF integrated the cyberterrorist aspect to a more effective degree, and Silva's ultimate plan has more weight to it. I mean, we could have a future villain doing something dastardly with cryptocurrency, AI technology or manipulating stock trades, but it needs to be in aid of something bigger.

    That isn't the topic of this thread, but the fact that Blofeld seems to have omnipotent surveillance capabilities before Nine Eyes goes live, might be the biggest plothole in the entire series. No one cares about the countdown at the end because it is totally unclear what it would allow him to do that he wasn't already able to do.
    And that's before we get into C apparently being the only one pushing that policy - which is just gone with his death - but there still being a whole new building (!) for it, on the Thames (!) which noone seems to be working in at the moment it is supposed to go live (?) and preparing and then unraveling something like that from both a foreign and security standpoint and a public service IT standpoint would probably take at least a decade.
    But that's enough about that film.

    I do wonder if they could go a bit more old school with it and have the more personal conflict be between the villain and a secondary character and Bond initially just comes in to help that character, gets pulled in, saves the day and goes on his way. Is that too "80s TV show"?
    It would allow a good writer to still have emotional beats in there, but we don't have to embark on another spiral of "but this time it's even more personal!". It is personal, but not necessarily for Bond. And I'm always a sucker for stories exploring Bond's (or generally the main characters) official duties as a civil servant and the personal costs his actions have for those more closely involved.
  • Posts: 2,564
    007HallY wrote: »
    The problem with leaning too heavily into technology for a villain's scheme is that it's tricky to sell that sense of high stakes without drifting into nanobots or the downright implausible. SP tried to keep things grounded but relevant with the Nine Eyes Programme, but even with the fact that it makes the 00 section null and void it doesn't feel like it's overly threatening... might be because surveillance is something we're used to in our modern world, or it might be because we don't actually see any real world consequence of this technology... I mean, they tried to raise the tension by having a countdown that they have to stop, but it feels a bit strange given it's a programme and can just be switched off once it goes up.

    In that sense I think SF integrated the cyberterrorist aspect to a more effective degree, and Silva's ultimate plan has more weight to it. I mean, we could have a future villain doing something dastardly with cryptocurrency, AI technology or manipulating stock trades, but it needs to be in aid of something bigger.

    That isn't the topic of this thread, but the fact that Blofeld seems to have omnipotent surveillance capabilities before Nine Eyes goes live, might be the biggest plothole in the entire series. No one cares about the countdown at the end because it is totally unclear what it would allow him to do that he wasn't already able to do.
    And that's before we get into C apparently being the only one pushing that policy - which is just gone with his death - but there still being a whole new building (!) for it, on the Thames (!) which noone seems to be working in at the moment it is supposed to go live (?) and preparing and then unraveling something like that from both a foreign and security standpoint and a public service IT standpoint would probably take at least a decade.
    But that's enough about that film.

    I can actually forgive the fact that a new building was written in, and that no one seems to be working in it. At the end of the day it's a Bond film, and contrivances can be forgiven if you're enjoying yourself in the moment.

    Otherwise yes, the lack of clear threat of the Nine Eyes programme does somewhat spoil the film. And makes the countdown somewhat underwhelming... like I said it's not a bomb, so won't do any sort of permanent damage.
    I do wonder if they could go a bit more old school with it and have the more personal conflict be between the villain and a secondary character and Bond initially just comes in to help that character, gets pulled in, saves the day and goes on his way. Is that too "80s TV show"?
    It would allow a good writer to still have emotional beats in there, but we don't have to embark on another spiral of "but this time it's even more personal!". It is personal, but not necessarily for Bond. And I'm always a sucker for stories exploring Bond's (or generally the main characters) official duties as a civil servant and the personal costs his actions have for those more closely involved.

    I think that'd be good. I'd like to have a future Bond film where the story begins as a relatively routine mission, possibly as you said involving some sort of conflict between the villain and a secondary character, that slowly spirals into something much more sinister. A bit like some of the Fleming novels I guess (ie. in MR Bond helps out M solve a minor gambling issue which gets him involved in the later events of the story, or in GF where Bond helps out Du Pont... in another gambling related issue come to think of it.... or the FYEO short story etc.)
  • edited October 2022 Posts: 875
    With the current energy crisis, and more globally the questions around new energies and global warming, I was wondering if this issue could come back in the future. Something close to Largo's scheme in NSNA (to destroy the world's oil reserves in the Middle East to bring Western countries to their knees) could be an interesting starting point.

    One's could say it's not so different from Elektra's scheme from TWINE, although here it was more about creating a situation favoring her economic interests, didn't involve Middle East oil fields and was limited to Istanbul.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    edited October 2022 Posts: 2,860
    It's certainly possible - didn't MGW once say something to the effect that they look at what the world's currently afraid of and then project that into the near future? QOS came shortly after pressure groups began raising concerns that the security of water supplies would be an issue in the future, etc.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    edited October 2022 Posts: 5,867
    Yes, QoS is based on Bolivian history.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cochabamba_Water_War

    I thought Amalric was quite good in an understated role. He wanted a scar or some tic but the director wouldn't let him:

    'According to Mathieu Amalric (Dominic Greene), his character does not have any distinguishing features to make him more formidable, and to represent the hidden villains of society: "He has no scars, no eye that bleeds, no metal jaw. I tried everything to have something to help me. I said to Marc Forster: No nothing? A beard? Can I shave my hair? He said: No, just your face." Amalric also described Greene as "not knowing how to fight, so James Bond would be more surprised. Sometimes anger can be much more dangerous. I'm going to fight like in school."'

    Where QoS failed, IMHO, was to have Quantum say it was a test run for some sort of world water domination.
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