No Time to Die production thread (MINOR SPOILERS ALLOWED)

19529539559579581213

Comments

  • Junglist_1985Junglist_1985 Los Angeles
    Posts: 404
    AgentM72 wrote: »
    Inspiration drawn from Casino Royale and On Her Majesty’s Secret Service sounds like the dream combo.

    Just about the most perfect formula possible, if there's also a From Russia with Love/Goldfinger splash in there. There's definitely a garnish of Dr. No...

    I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s FRWL style pacing as Craig described the movie as a “thriller”. Also, we know there’s a sprinkle of YOLT (at least the literary version) in there.
  • StarkStark France
    edited October 2020 Posts: 153
    According to Variety, NTTD has a net budget of $301 million and MGM had already spent $66 million in marketing costs.

    https://variety.com/2020/film/news/no-time-to-die-james-bond-mgm-streaming-sale-1234819582/
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython "I want you looking FABULOUS."
    Posts: 5,099
    Makes me wonder how much all the other delayed films cost.
  • w2bondw2bond is indeed a very rare breed
    Posts: 2,239
    Stark wrote: »
    Excellent interview of Fukunaga in the French magazine "Première".

    Short summary (sorry if my english is imperfect) :

    - For him and Linus Sandgren, color grading had to be a source of emotion. The whole film is thought as if the events took place in the last minutes of the twilight. They wanted a mixture of blue and white (this probably explains why the colour grading is so different in Matera between the first and second trailer).

    - Casino Royale is his first inspiration, he considers the film "vastly better" than Quantum, Skyfall and Spectre. NTTD will use themes from "Casino Royale" (how does it feel to be a killer...), but not from Skyfall and Spectre.

    - He had a very important creative control (director and main writer).

    - He is a fan of On Her Majesty's Secret Service.

    Good to hear, but the leftover threads from previous films has me nervous. So I'm still cautiously optimistic

  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 3,876
    Whenever I listen to Cary, it makes me wish he directed SF-NTTD or at least SP-NTTD.
  • MalloryMallory Are you ready to get back to work?
    Posts: 1,509
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Whenever I listen to Cary, it makes me wish he directed SF-NTTD or at least SP-NTTD.

    SP and NTTD as a proper, written from the ground up two parter. I believe John Logan originally pitched Bond 24 and 25 as a two parter, that would've been cool.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 3,876
    Mallory wrote: »
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Whenever I listen to Cary, it makes me wish he directed SF-NTTD or at least SP-NTTD.

    SP and NTTD as a proper, written from the ground up two parter. I believe John Logan originally pitched Bond 24 and 25 as a two parter, that would've been cool.

    Yeah. It would have, even if I'm not a fan of continuity in Bond films. I prefer standalone Bond adventures. But if Cary did SP, it would have been cool.

    Bringing back directors immediately can be risky, as they tend to repeat themselves. But since someone like Cary did True Detective, he surely knows how continuity works.
  • phantomvicesphantomvices Mother Base
    Posts: 469
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ben-whishaw-interview-on-no-time-to-die-fargo-and-surviving-lockdown-ld9bdd0lp

    Can anyone get past the paywall and get a rip of this?

    Also RIP sean connery, just heard the sad news
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,731

    Also RIP sean connery, just heard the sad news

    Feels likely to me that NTTD will have a tribute caption now, to both Sir Roger and Sir Sean.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 6,148
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Mallory wrote: »
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Whenever I listen to Cary, it makes me wish he directed SF-NTTD or at least SP-NTTD.

    SP and NTTD as a proper, written from the ground up two parter. I believe John Logan originally pitched Bond 24 and 25 as a two parter, that would've been cool.

    Yeah. It would have, even if I'm not a fan of continuity in Bond films. I prefer standalone Bond adventures. But if Cary did SP, it would have been cool.

    Bringing back directors immediately can be risky, as they tend to repeat themselves. But since someone like Cary did True Detective, he surely knows how continuity works.
    The continuity, specifically linking the various villains of the Craig era to SPECTRE, could have been handled much more organically, in a less heavy handed manner.
  • cwl007cwl007 England
    Posts: 574
    mtm wrote: »

    Also RIP sean connery, just heard the sad news

    Feels likely to me that NTTD will have a tribute caption now, to both Sir Roger and Sir Sean.

    100% and if they don't, shame on them.
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    Posts: 2,949
    I believe these are new stills?

    9FkrVWy.jpg
    KzCDU3m.jpg
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 11,744
    Yep, they're new. Nice find.
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    Posts: 2,949
    QBranch wrote: »
    Yep, they're new. Nice find.

    Just checked the archive. I have Lashana in another still, same place but no gun, just standing straight and the image is cropped. So this is a new image and really cool that we get to see the full bunker set. Same with Craig, that we can part of the bunker set with blue screen
  • Red_SnowRed_Snow Australia
    Posts: 2,194
    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ben-whishaw-interview-on-no-time-to-die-fargo-and-surviving-lockdown-ld9bdd0lp

    Can anyone get past the paywall and get a rip of this?

    Also RIP sean connery, just heard the sad news

    Yes, here are all the mentions of NTTD:
    Ben Whishaw on No Time to Die, Fargo and surviving lockdown

    Ben Whishaw and I are seated on benches outside a restaurant in east London. Inside is a vast emporium and lots of chandeliers, but its glamour is infected with coronavirus reminders – hand sanitiser on tables and “Don’t go this way, go that way” signs. It feels as if we are seeing the dawn of something much worse that’s going to happen.

    Whishaw appears a little thin; even in a chunky bottle-green jumper and jeans, he looks as if he could fall down the crack of a pavement. His facial hair accentuates already well-defined cheekbones.

    There is something portentous about the afternoon, as if it’s going to thunder, but it doesn’t. It’s to do with the fact we don’t know what social restrictions are coming; that we’re on the eve of something bad again. “It’s true, but this time we’ve gone through it already. We don’t want to go there again but there seems no stopping it,” Whishaw says. “It seems inevitable, inevitable bleakness.” Right now, he says, he really wants a cheese toastie, but he doesn’t get up to order it.

    We are talking a few weeks before what we believe is the November release of the latest Bond film, No Time to Die, in which Whishaw, 40, reprises his role as the fastidious quartermaster, Q. Whishaw is enthusiastic, not knowing that, days later, it will be delayed for the second time.

    “It is hard to remember a time before walking around in masks, washing our hands every five minutes and sanitisers, and I think the Bond film is just what we really need right now, I really do,” he says. “We need something that is thrilling and fun and a kind of escapism. Bond is the one film that people might actually want to be persuaded to go out and see. This is something that is diverse and multigenerational; it could unite everybody.”

    Despite his enthusiasm, he says, it’s hard to talk about the new film, “Partly because it was long ago. Although it wasn’t that long ago, it does feel like it. But also, we never did get the full script. I did my bits not in chronological order, so I find it hard. I’m not allowed to tell you what happens in the story, and even if I was I couldn’t, because of the way that it happened. But I can say that very late in the day I give him some technology that helps.”

    Do they not give you a full script because everything is changing all the time or because they’re so paranoid that things will be leaked? “It’s partly the secrecy that always surrounds it, but on this one, to be honest, it was a difficult journey. Although it was part-intentional, the director works in quite an improvisational way and we had a very tight deadline. But as I say, they don’t tell us anything.”

    The plus side of coronavirus is that it has allowed him a pause in a career in which projects have tumbled into each other. He has completed shooting a new series of Fargo, due to be released in Britain in 2021, in which he’s joined the cast for the first time. Filming for his next project, in which he plays Adam Kay in the TV series This Is Going to Hurt – based on Kay’s book about life as a junior doctor in the NHS – has been put back to January. “At the earliest,” he says. He has gone from nonstop working to doing… “Nothing. I’ve been a bit of a hermit. Once we were forced to stop, I didn’t have any inclination to do anything really. I wanted to stop. I’ve seen my family when we were allowed to and I’ve gone for long walks and had loads of naps,” he says, not even trying not to sound bleak.

    [...]

    The Bond movie became the first big film to postpone release, although when we meet in London he doesn’t know why that decision had been taken so early. “I honestly have no idea,” he says. “I just got a text message from Barbara... They never explained.” Perhaps because it’s called No Time to Die. We laugh. Perhaps a little too manically, because we know scary times may follow.
  • StarkStark France
    Posts: 153
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Mallory wrote: »
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    Whenever I listen to Cary, it makes me wish he directed SF-NTTD or at least SP-NTTD.

    SP and NTTD as a proper, written from the ground up two parter. I believe John Logan originally pitched Bond 24 and 25 as a two parter, that would've been cool.

    Yeah. It would have, even if I'm not a fan of continuity in Bond films. I prefer standalone Bond adventures. But if Cary did SP, it would have been cool.

    Bringing back directors immediately can be risky, as they tend to repeat themselves. But since someone like Cary did True Detective, he surely knows how continuity works.

    I love Cary but he couldn't have done anything right with Spectre script.
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    Posts: 2,949

    I think there's even a video interview embedded. At least he did the interview via Zoom.
  • leas_moleleas_mole love is the promise of suffering
    edited November 2020 Posts: 569
    Here you go, here is the full interview - note that Léa cut her hair for a new French film directed by Arnaud Desplechin (the 2nd time she has worked with him)

    No Time to Die star Léa Seydoux: ‘I don’t think a Bond woman is any more an object of desire than Bond is’

    Léa Seydoux is the arthouse star who made the rare leap to global fame — as a Bond girl. As she (and the world) patiently awaits 007’s next outing, she talks sexism and stereotypes with Louis Wise

    %2Fmethode%2Fsundaytimes%2Fprod%2Fweb%2Fbin%2F97c331a6-190d-11eb-9310-80eb93b6f705.jpg?crop=1300%2C1625%2C0%2C0&resize=1022

    I am trying hard to not bring lazy French stereotypes into my interview with Léa Seydoux, but she is hardly helping me. It’s bad enough that the 35-year-old Parisian actress has a fine line in moody and mysterious; that she won a Palme d’Or at Cannes for the graphic Sapphic bonkbuster Blue Is the Warmest Colour; that she shot to global fame in the James Bond movie Spectre playing ze sexy French doctor-lady Madeleine Swann. Also, that she has been the face of Louis Vuitton for the past five years. Here she is summing up her lockdown, from her apartment in Paris, via Zoom.

    “Oh God, I sound like the cliché of the Frenchwoman,” she says, groaning, plonked on her sofa in a white T-shirt and blue jeans, and boasting a crop of short, mussed-up hair. “But we were in the countryside, and I used to sit and watch the river there and read Flaubert and drink red wine.” We fall apart laughing. Did you have a beret on too? “Oui! And a little baguette under my arm!”

    The surprise here isn’t that Seydoux is so French, but that she is having such a good laugh about it. After all, on screen she specialises in scowls, huffs and pent-up desire; earlier interviews with her have suggested she’s like this off screen too. The Flaubert she was reading was Madame Bovary, about the bored housewife who essentially kills herself out of ennui, and this seems very Seydoux. She even admits it herself: “She’s a character I think I could play on screen. I’d like that.”

    And yet today, sitting in the apartment she shares with her partner, André Meyer (a “banking scion”, according to reports), and their three-year-old son, Georges, she’s in a jolly, almost silly mood. If she is a stereotyped Parisienne, it’s not the ones being shown in Emily in Paris (I know — shame), but that more realistic version: ultra low-key, but super well maintained, always clad in easy classics like, well, jeans and a white T-shirt. You might be surprised to hear that she is a big fan of Fleabag. “I found it really funny,” she says, beaming. “I love English humour — and I think I have it too.”

    Phoebe Waller-Bridge is involved in her next film outing — or what was due to be her next film, anyway. No Time to Die, the follow-up to Spectre, has been delayed for a second time, and now won’t come out until next spring. If details are scarce, Seydoux confirms that Waller-Bridge has added “some very funny bits”. Still, it seems light years away from her usual thing, where she works with the likes of Yorgos Lanthimos or Wes Anderson (she is in his next film, The French Dispatch). Is she doing Bond to pay the bills? She frowns.

    “I hear people around me say, ‘Oh James Bond is rubbish,’ but I have no cynicism about Bond at all. I’m really profoundly pleased to have made this film. Honestly, the stunts, the chases … it’s a laugh!” How does she feel about being called a Bond girl? “The roles have evolved a bit — the title is a bit old-fashioned now,” she says. She thinks “Bond woman” could be better, but the thing is, she says, it really goes both ways. “I don’t think that a Bond woman is any more an object of desire than Bond is. With him, I think there is a female gaze — you look at him in a sexy way. When he gets out of the water in his trunks, he’s eroticised. It’s obvious!”

    Whether she likes it or not, Seydoux and her work have often contributed to the big sexual politics hoo-has of the day. In 2013 the exceptional Blue Is the Warmest Colour won both her and her co-star, Adèle Exarchopoulos, Palme d’Ors for best film alongside the director Abdellatif Kechiche (who would normally receive the award alone). But both actresses complained about the gruelling atmosphere on set, specifically when filming the graphic sex scenes, which, as Seydoux repeats today, “are very, very super long”. In the ensuing war of words via the press, Kechiche called her a “spoilt child”. And yet “I don’t regret having done it at all,” she says today. “Quite the contrary. I’m really very proud, and maybe I didn’t say it enough.”

    In 2017 she caused a stir by writing an article detailing her experiences with Harvey Weinstein. After sizing her up like “a piece of meat”, the disgraced mogul tried to kiss her in a hotel room, she wrote, but she got away. She also detailed various other personal experiences of sexism and harassment in the industry. Yet at the same time she was pretty clear that the whole system knew about Weinstein — and was, to some extent, complicit (“That’s the most disgusting thing. Everyone knew what Harvey was up to and no one did anything”). But today she confirms something she said more recently — that she dislikes the excessive demonisation that #MeToo has also seemed to encourage.

    “I’m always for nuance, because I think things are always more complicated than they seem,” she says. “I mean, it’s crazy how late it has been, and it’s good that women want to speak up, that they want to take power. I felt it. But I think it can be done in perhaps too radical a way. It’s something which can stop dialogue and which ultimately isolates people.”

    Seydoux says that she loves Daniel Craig’s Bond because he shows both a masculine and feminine side, and she feels the same. “I never say to myself, ‘Oh! I’m a woman!’ I know I’m a woman, but I also feel like a man.” In fact, “I always identified with actors, never actresses. I wanted to do cinema because I watched actors — I saw Marlon Brando and I wanted to be like him.” She feels so strongly on it that she interrupts me five minutes later when I refer to her being an actress — “I really don’t feel like an actress, I feel like an actor.” But why?

    “I found that male actors had more freedom,” she says with a sigh. “It’s true that I saw that women [in film] were in more passive positions, because women do have a tendency to receive. I mean, in sex, the woman gets penetrated.” OK, go on. “Whereas what I like with men is … well, I mean, obviously, they have a penis!” She smiles. “They give! And I like giving!” Soon she is giggling madly. “I often feel like I’m a gay man, to be honest. I like men a bit like a gay man does.” Umm. There are so many ways to take this: are you saying it’s nice to be able to express your desire frankly? She goes a bit coy. “Mmmm-hmm. Of course.”

    If it took Seydoux a minute to realise she wanted to act, it’s not as though the clues weren’t there. Born Léa Hélène Seydoux-Fornier de Clausonne into a family stuffed with aristocrats and industrialists — her grandfather is the chairman of the French film company Pathé, while her great-uncle is chairman of the film studio Gaumont — she is the younger daughter of a businessman father and a mother who is a philanthropist living in Senegal, who split up when she was three. She has described her childhood in the past as bohemian, if not downright chaotic. Is Georges getting the same kind of education she had?

    “Non,” she says firmly. “Non! Happily for him.” A rueful laugh, then silence — Seydoux’s forthrightness only shutters down when it comes to Meyer and her child. Right, because it was all so messy before? “Mmmm-hmm.” Has she made peace with her own upbringing? “Well, yes. I don’t think I’d have liked anything else … And I can see it brought me lots of stuff.” Most of all, her parents were “pretty free”, she says, and “I was always told I was free — to do whatever you want, to love whoever you want. That’s amazing.” So do you say that to your son too? “Oh, of course. My son is completely free.” A naughty pause. “But I’d like it if he worked hard at school, though!”

    She herself didn’t do so well at school, she admits — another system she struggled fully to get on board with, just like the movies now. But she says she quite likes that tension. Genial as she is today, it’s clear that Seydoux isn’t into the easy things in life. “Maybe it’s really French to think it, but I’ve always had the impression that beauty comes out of suffering,” she says. “When you’re acting there is always a moment when you’re uncomfortable … when you have to put your balls on the table, as we say in French.” She starts to laugh again. “I mean, not just your balls, but your heart too.” She groans. “Oh God, ‘your balls and your heart’. This is the daftest interview I’ve ever done!” I don’t think she sounds daft at all, though, just a bit Fleabag à la française.

    Seydoux is a global ambassador for Louis Vuitton; louisvuitton.com. No Time to Die and The French Dispatch will be released in 2021
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    Posts: 4,666
    Everyone see Finneas and his girlfriend’s costume for Halloween yesterday?

  • edited November 2020 Posts: 129
    So something curious. Apple have announced a “One more thing” event in November. Curiously the artwork for the event could be interpreted as the Apple logo acting as a projector. Whilst I think there’s going to be an announcement based on Apple’s own in-house silicon powering new MacBooks, it could also be news of an MGM acquisition.

    https://www.theverge.com/2020/11/2/21546136/apple-event-date-time-november-10th-one-more-thing-arm-mac-silicon
  • DCisaredDCisared Liverpool
    Posts: 1,305
    Ha ha that interview with Lea was great. I love her.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,731
    Denbigh wrote: »
    Everyone see Finneas and his girlfriend’s costume for Halloween yesterday?


    What a shame there was no massive Halloween theme in that film they could have used.

    Spectre-Day-of-the-Dead-Costume.jpg
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    Posts: 2,949
    mtm wrote: »
    Denbigh wrote: »
    Everyone see Finneas and his girlfriend’s costume for Halloween yesterday?


    What a shame there was no massive Halloween theme in that film they could have used.

    Spectre-Day-of-the-Dead-Costume.jpg

    It's November 2nd today and Mexico city is celebrating Day of the Dead with an annual parade since 2016, all inspired by the staged one in Spectre
  • Posts: 601
    Bond's date looks like that American politician. What's her name again?
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    edited November 2020 Posts: 2,949
    Bond's date looks like that American politician. What's her name again?

    Date: Stephanie Sigman

    If you mean the politican: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    edited November 2020 Posts: 2,949
    ...
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    Posts: 2,949
  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,754
    Contraband wrote: »

    Old, but cool photo.
Sign In or Register to comment.