No Time to Die production thread (MINOR SPOILERS ALLOWED)

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  • Posts: 1,195
    The retro fitting of Blofeld/Spectre into the rest of the Craig era films was a disaster the way it was handled.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,272
    delfloria wrote: »
    The retro fitting of Blofeld/Spectre into the rest of the Craig era films was a disaster the way it was handled.

    Yes, especially since the arc is unnecessary. Really, we had two sets of tandem films (CR/QoS and SP/NTTD) bridged by SF. The first set is young, reckless Bond. The second set is older, more grizzled Bond. The two sets mirror each other in many ways: Bond is haunted by his love for a woman while dealing with a secret, sinister organization. All the while, SF acts to lead us from one to the other.

    Overall, I have thoroughly enjoyed the DC era, but to connect all five films was a bit of a mistake.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 3,845
    I love Craig's Bond as well. But the sudden thought of EON to link his films still hurts me. It really hurts because it's just one film that undermined everything. SP should have been a standalone Bond film like SF and nothing would have been connected. Although, I think another generation that would come, wouldn't notice the retconning that didn't work with us. Because they didn't follow the films one after the other like we did. They'll just stumble on the 5 Craig Bond films and would really enjoy the connection in the films.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    edited February 12 Posts: 603
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    I love Craig's Bond as well. But the sudden thought of EON to link his films still hurts me. It really hurts because it's just one film that undermined everything. SP should have been a standalone Bond film like SF and nothing would have been connected. Although, I think another generation that would come, wouldn't notice the retconning that didn't work with us. Because they didn't follow the films one after the other like we did. They'll just stumble on the 5 Craig Bond films and would really enjoy the connection in the films.

    Honestly, I don't mind the general thought that they are connected. Two things that bother me:
    1. The unnecessary brother angle, which NTTD might make even more infuriating by ignoring it altogether. I don't know how they could do it, but I would prefer it if they somehow gave us a reason for the connection to be there in the first place. I think others here are more of the opinion that it should never be brought up again.
    2. Pulling SF into all of this. You rightly said that there are clear connections between CR, QoS and SP (the Mr. White Trilogy, if you will) that will be extended in NTTD. SF is basically a completely different thing apart from the personnel situation at MI6 (M, Q and Moneypenny). Silva is retconned as having a SPECTRE connection, but there is no indication of that in SF itself. Silva is such an incredible villain with such personal and psychotic motives, that his being a subsidiary of SPECTRE diminishes him, even though it is good Bond tradition to have every villain, no matter how independent they are, have some connection to SMERSH/SPECTRE.
    That movie to me is this weird little gem inside this bigger arc that doesn't fit into the rest of it at all. It is all about aging and heritage and being obsolete and last stands and somehow it is the middle point of a five-movie arc? I prefer to think of it as it's own thing that kind of stands to the side of the rest of the Craig era. Especially, when they now seem to rehash some of the "old Bond" points with the last film of the actor's run, as they should.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Lagos, Nigeria
    Posts: 3,845
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    I love Craig's Bond as well. But the sudden thought of EON to link his films still hurts me. It really hurts because it's just one film that undermined everything. SP should have been a standalone Bond film like SF and nothing would have been connected. Although, I think another generation that would come, wouldn't notice the retconning that didn't work with us. Because they didn't follow the films one after the other like we did. They'll just stumble on the 5 Craig Bond films and would really enjoy the connection in the films.

    Honestly, I don't mind the general thought that they are connected. Two things that bother me:
    1. The unnecessary brother angle, which NTTD might make even more infuriating by ignoring it altogether. I don't know how they could do it, but I would prefer it if they somehow gave us a reason for the connection to be there in the first place. I think others here are more of the opinion that it should never be brought up again.
    2. Pulling SF into all of this. You rightly said that there are clear connections between CR, QoS and SP (the Mr. White Trilogy, if you will) that will be extended in NTTD. SF is basically a completely different thing apart from the personnel situation at MI6 (M, Q and Moneypenny). Silva is retconned as having a SPECTRE connection, but there is no indication of that in SF itself. Silva is such an incredible villain with such personal and psychotic motives, that his being a subsidiary of SPECTRE diminishes him, even though it is good Bond tradition to have every villain, no matter how independent they are, have some connection to SMERSH/SPECTRE.
    That movie to me is this weird little gem inside this bigger arc that doesn't fit into the rest of it at all. It is all about aging and heritage and being obsolete and last stands and somehow it is the middle point of a five-movie arc? I prefer to think of it as it's own thing that kind of stands to the side of the rest of the Craig era. Especially, when they now seem to rehash some of the "old Bond" points with the last film of the actor's run, as they should.

    Yeah. That's it. And the aging and being obsolete thing would have even suited NTTD more, since he's coming back after leaving service. And maybe SF and SP should have continued to show him as the extremely aggressive 007 he was in CR & QoS, even if he introduced himself as Bond in CR's final scene.

    I think no matter what the plot of NTTD is or how it's handled, one thing that's certain is, it's going to be a return to CR & QoS' type of action....like right in our faces, which is what we expect from Craig's Bond. So that's already a positive sign for NTTD. NTTD could still be the perfect culmination of Craig's Bond, maybe that's why it has such a lengthy runtime.
  • Posts: 582
    Why can’t Bond be on television? Look how well MCU has slid into streaming. I feel that a Bond tv show, especially with the budget of a Disney plus show, can thrive in today’s world.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Kingdumb of Norway
    Posts: 41,526
    Why can’t Bond be on television? Look how well MCU has slid into streaming. I feel that a Bond tv show, especially with the budget of a Disney plus show, can thrive in today’s world.

    It happened. 1954.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,272
    GadgetMan wrote: »
    I love Craig's Bond as well. But the sudden thought of EON to link his films still hurts me. It really hurts because it's just one film that undermined everything. SP should have been a standalone Bond film like SF and nothing would have been connected. Although, I think another generation that would come, wouldn't notice the retconning that didn't work with us. Because they didn't follow the films one after the other like we did. They'll just stumble on the 5 Craig Bond films and would really enjoy the connection in the films.

    Honestly, I don't mind the general thought that they are connected. Two things that bother me:
    1. The unnecessary brother angle, which NTTD might make even more infuriating by ignoring it altogether. I don't know how they could do it, but I would prefer it if they somehow gave us a reason for the connection to be there in the first place. I think others here are more of the opinion that it should never be brought up again.
    2. Pulling SF into all of this. You rightly said that there are clear connections between CR, QoS and SP (the Mr. White Trilogy, if you will) that will be extended in NTTD. SF is basically a completely different thing apart from the personnel situation at MI6 (M, Q and Moneypenny). Silva is retconned as having a SPECTRE connection, but there is no indication of that in SF itself. Silva is such an incredible villain with such personal and psychotic motives, that his being a subsidiary of SPECTRE diminishes him, even though it is good Bond tradition to have every villain, no matter how independent they are, have some connection to SMERSH/SPECTRE.
    That movie to me is this weird little gem inside this bigger arc that doesn't fit into the rest of it at all. It is all about aging and heritage and being obsolete and last stands and somehow it is the middle point of a five-movie arc? I prefer to think of it as it's own thing that kind of stands to the side of the rest of the Craig era. Especially, when they now seem to rehash some of the "old Bond" points with the last film of the actor's run, as they should.

    The only clue, connecting SF and SP (which is kind of interesting), is Silva's use of sugar skulls in his computer messages to M.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    edited February 13 Posts: 9,123
    Silva works for the highest BEE-duh. Who would be the highest BEE-duh?

    SPECTRE is a natural connection and later reveal. It wouldn't serve the focus of the Skyfall story, also understanding the rights weren't available at the time.

    And the skulls are quite a visual connection as pointed out.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 6,030
    As Bond and Blofeld discuss their previous run ins and Bond realizes that Le Chiffre and Greene were operatives of SPECTRE I would have had him say, “Silva?
    After a pause Blofeld would reply, “ No.....he was brilliant, but too, impulsive; SPECTRE values discipline”.
    This is all that had to be mentioned of these characters; it would have loosely tied them to Blofeld without becoming convoluted. Mention them then move on.
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 11,492
    Just getting back to NTTD for a minute:

    It took over a month, but finally, the third book arrived yesterday. Many thanks to @marketto007 @mtm @Torgeirtrap @MattiaDeVarti007 Well done guys.

    50938971331_6b46653840_o.jpg
    50939077622_6b1e114321_o.png
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,272
    QBranch wrote: »
    Just getting back to NTTD for a minute:

    It took over a month, but finally, the third book arrived yesterday. Many thanks to @marketto007 @mtm @Torgeirtrap @MattiaDeVarti007 Well done guys.

    50938971331_6b46653840_o.jpg
    50939077622_6b1e114321_o.png

    Love it!
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 11,492
    TripAces wrote: »
    Love it!
    Cheers! It's fun trying to re-enact the scene with what I have available.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,300
    I hadn't thought about those two photos being similar: looks like with those and the speargun he's always creeping around his house with a weapon. He should invest in a burglar alarm! Or doors.
  • Red_SnowRed_Snow Australia
    Posts: 2,161


    A very in depth article from production sound mixer Simon Hayes about the Norwegian leg of the shoot.
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    Posts: 2,938
    Red_Snow wrote: »


    A very in depth article from production sound mixer Simon Hayes about the Norwegian leg of the shoot.

    Thanks for sharing, @Red_Snow.

    Alternate download, PDF: https://docdro.id/jgho4Td
  • edited February 13 Posts: 15,553
    QBranch wrote: »
    Just getting back to NTTD for a minute:

    It took over a month, but finally, the third book arrived yesterday. Many thanks to @marketto007 @mtm @Torgeirtrap @MattiaDeVarti007 Well done guys.

    50938971331_6b46653840_o.jpg
    50939077622_6b1e114321_o.png

    A moth to collect all books seems pretty fast to me, @QBranch! Have you read any of them?
  • QBranchQBranch Always have an escape plan. Mine is watching James Bond films.
    Posts: 11,492
    @Torgeirtrap Haven't read any of these ones yet, but the Postwar book looks like it'd take a year to get through!
  • Posts: 784
    Time's Arrow is short, but intense. A brilliant book.
  • edited February 14 Posts: 15,553
    QBranch wrote: »
    @Torgeirtrap Haven't read any of these ones yet, but the Postwar book looks like it'd take a year to get through!

    Haha, yes! Postwar looks to be quite the task to get through. Might be an interesting read though!
  • ShardlakeShardlake Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
    edited February 14 Posts: 4,041
    Red_Snow wrote: »


    A very in depth article from production sound mixer Simon Hayes about the Norwegian leg of the shoot.

    Thanks for sharing, I'm not going to lie , a lot of far too technical information there. Although the one thing that does come over is Simon Hayes has a lot of time for Dan, he says he is hugely collaborative, professional and pleasure to work with.

    Goes a little against the grain of those that think he is a primadonna who always gets his own way. I doubt we'll ever hear secretly recorded audio of Dan loosing it and acting like god on the set and treating the crew like dirt.
  • QsCatQsCat London
    edited February 14 Posts: 158
    Red_Snow wrote: »


    A very in depth article from production sound mixer Simon Hayes about the Norwegian leg of the shoot.

    Very interesting, and a second part to look forward to in the next issue.
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    edited February 14 Posts: 2,938
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    edited February 15 Posts: 2,938
    Red_Snow wrote: »

    Also ft in Aston Martin Magazine, Issue 46:

    BACK STORIES: MEET THE CREATIVE TEAM BEHIND NO TIME TO DIE

    FROM GROUND-BREAKING BLASTS TO TRAILBLAZING PROPS, WE INTERVIEW THE BEHIND-THE-SCENES CREW TASKED WITH BRINGING THE ICONIC JAMES BOND MOVIES TO LIFE

    CHRIS CORBOULD OBE, Special Effects Director (below)

    Chris Corbould is a record-breaker as well as an Oscar winner. The No Time To Die Special Effects Director, who returns for his 15th James Bond film, oversaw the mammoth explosion that ripped through Blofeld’s desert lair in 2015’s Spectre. Lasting for 7.5 seconds, the blast propelled Corbould into the Guinness World Records book, earning a certificate for the largest film stunt explosion ever seen on screen.

    A true Bond series veteran, Corbould made his debut in 1977 with his role as a technician on The Spy Who Loved Me. In 1995, when Pierce Brosnan took the lead role in GoldenEye, Corbould worked his first 007 film as a supervisor and has been responsible for the special effects on every Bond film since.

    CHARLIE HAYES, Location Manager

    Locations are a fundamental component of the James Bond films, reflecting the mood and tone of the narrative, as well as transporting the audience to beautiful, fearsome or exotic parts of the globe. According to No Time To Die’s Location Manager Charlie Hayes, the director and production designer were always very specific about the locations.

    “There was always a mood or a feeling that we wanted the locations to evoke, as well as being right for action and set pieces,” explains Hayes, who has worked on every Bond film since 2008’s Quantum of Solace.

    No Time To Die carries Bond all over the globe, from Norway to Jamaica — although Hayes notes that one of the most thrilling locations was Matera in southern Italy, where the filmmakers shot scenes with the DB5.

    “Matera is a magical place,” he explains. “It is not built for the modern world. The roads are narrow and short and it doesn’t seem like the obvious place to do a car chase. However, we use the environment and the vehicles in a way that you just don’t expect. Working there was amazing.”

    MARK TILDESLEY, Production Designer

    Throughout the Daniel Craig era, the Bond filmmakers have offered a number of glimpses into their characters’ personal space, whether it’s M’s beautifully furnished house or 007’s rather spartan London flat. Further insights are offered in No Time To Die, where Production Designer Mark Tildesley was charged with bringing Bond’s Jamaican retreat and Q’s London abode to the screen.

    For Bond’s home in Jamaica, Tildesley — working on his first film in the series — says that he initially imagined something “super architectural”, but soon realised that the film would be better served by a bespoke wooden structure, built with local materials, which complemented not only the beauty of the landscape, but also Bond’s desire to be closer to nature.

    “We built a house by the sea where Bond could easily get in his boat and do a bit of fishing,” says Tildesley. “It is a very Jamaican-styled home, with everything feeling handmade.”

    For Q’s home in London, meanwhile, Tildesley says he wanted an abode that would reflect the quartermaster’s quirky personality. “We’ve given him a house not far from Waterloo station, so that he can cycle to work,” he says. “It’s a traditional Victorian cottage that is quite cosy — a bit like Q himself.”

    SUTTIRAT ANNE LARLARB, Costume Designer

    Managing the sartorial strategy on the world’s longest-running film franchise is a mammoth logistical challenge, a fact that is not lost on No Time To Die Costume Designer Suttirat Anne Larlarb. She cites the journey of Bond’s latest tuxedo as a case in point. She had been working with fashion designer Tom Ford on developing a fresh look for the tux and, while they would usually work with a six-month lead time, Larlarb and Ford only had six weeks to get the job done. “It came down to the wire,” says Larlarb, who is making her Bond debut. “We had it ready literally seconds before he needed to put it on in Jamaica. It was definitely an adventure.”

    Larlarb, who is also an Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, is responsible for the look of every character in No Time To Die, although she notes that the biggest pressure comes with dressing James Bond himself. And Bond’s tux is, arguably, his most iconic piece of clothing. “We wanted to make sure that the tux sang the praises of this new version of Daniel Craig that appears with us in this film,” she says. “So we made lots of tweaks to create something new and exciting.”

    https://magazine.astonmartin.com/people/back-stories-meet-creative-team-behind-no-time-die

    AN UNBREAKABLE BOND: MAREK REICHMAN ON ASTON MARTIN AND 007
    https://magazine.astonmartin.com/people/unbreakable-bond-marek-reichman-aston-martin-and-007

    BEN STRONG ON Q ADVANCED OPERATIONS AND NO TIME TO DIE
    https://magazine.astonmartin.com/people/ben-strong-q-advanced-operations-and-no-time-die

    PREMIUM BOND: CHARTING DANIEL CRAIG’S STARRING ROLE AS 007
    https://magazine.astonmartin.com/people/premium-bond-charting-daniel-craigs-starring-role-007
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,300
    Unusual photo from Spectre there in the Craig article; not sure I've seen that one before.
  • ContrabandContraband Sweden
    edited February 15 Posts: 2,938
    mtm wrote: »
    Unusual photo from Spectre there in the Craig article; not sure I've seen that one before.

    I think it's cropped. Might have the full version in the archive.

    Update: Or maybe not. Have a few other angles from the same scene
  • Posts: 582
    Casino Royal came out two years before Iron Man. No Time to Die will come out two years after Endgame. Very interesting.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    edited February 16 Posts: 8,300
    That's a good point; feels like Downey played Iron Man for ages, but Craig lasted longer. Although he appeared in much fewer films of course!
  • Bentley007Bentley007 Manitoba, Canada
    Posts: 521
    Shardlake wrote: »
    Red_Snow wrote: »


    A very in depth article from production sound mixer Simon Hayes about the Norwegian leg of the shoot.

    Thanks for sharing, I'm not going to lie , a lot of far too technical information there. Although the one thing that does come over is Simon Hayes has a lot of time for Dan, he says he is hugely collaborative, professional and pleasure to work with.

    Goes a little against the grain of those that think he is a primadonna who always gets his own way. I doubt we'll ever hear secretly recorded audio of Dan loosing it and acting like god on the set and treating the crew like dirt.

    I really appreciate how technically proficient Cary sounds in this article. We all knew his skills with a camera and as a writer but he sounds like he knows a lot about sound as well. Between his vision for the sound and Zimmers score this Bond will sound good. I am especially taken by his understanding of wanting the flashback scene to look and sound older and have this done during the shoot not in post.
    I am starting to hope Cary comes back to introduce a new Bond as well with a total clean slate and carte blanche.
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