'Riding through the glen !'..The Robin Hood discussion thread.

24

Comments

  • Posts: 14,896
    The accent was only part of the problem. Robin Hood should be larger than life, a natural leader, heroic. Costner's Robin Hood had none of this. Only bullet time effect for the arrows he shot to make up for his lack of screen presence.
  • Posts: 15,926
    This thread reminds me I had a copy of Hammer Film's SWORD OF SHERWOOD FOREST with Peter Cushing as The Sheriff and Richard Greene reprising his role from the television series as Robin. Really wasn't bad and I wish I still had it. Greene was a pretty damn good Robin, and after Errol Flynn probably my favorite. At least those guys had the right look. Coster looked like Coster with a mullet.
    I'd agree that Robin Hood should be larger than life and played up to a degree. Flynn had that aspect down to a tee. Seems newer versions are intimidated by costuming him in the traditional green and brown outfit. I don't remember anything Russell Crowe wore, or what he looked like in the part. I think maybe he had a Cesar haircut- still that film wasn't memorable.
    I believe Patrick Bergin also played the role around the time the Coster film came out, though I never saw his version.
  • Posts: 19,339
    I havent seen it either,the Bergin version,but word is that it was better.
    I need to check that out.
  • MrcogginsMrcoggins Following in the footsteps of Quentin Quigley.
    Posts: 3,144
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Your mum is right...he hammed it up ,but didnt everyone in that film ? ...he outdid Costner in EVERY scene they were in.

    That's because Alan Rickman was An Actor something which Costner is still trying to be.

  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    The very first Robin Hood film was Robin Hood and His Merry Men from 1908.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
  • Posts: 14,896
    ToTheRight wrote: »
    This thread reminds me I had a copy of Hammer Film's SWORD OF SHERWOOD FOREST with Peter Cushing as The Sheriff and Richard Greene reprising his role from the television series as Robin. Really wasn't bad and I wish I still had it. Greene was a pretty damn good Robin, and after Errol Flynn probably my favorite. At least those guys had the right look. Coster looked like Coster with a mullet.
    I'd agree that Robin Hood should be larger than life and played up to a degree. Flynn had that aspect down to a tee. Seems newer versions are intimidated by costuming him in the traditional green and brown outfit. I don't remember anything Russell Crowe wore, or what he looked like in the part. I think maybe he had a Cesar haircut- still that film wasn't memorable.
    I believe Patrick Bergin also played the role around the time the Coster film came out, though I never saw his version.

    Crowe was not great and his Robin Hood was not very good. But at least he had courage and looked and acted like he could hold himself in a fight... And not shy away from it. The character and movie were too dark and a poor man's Gladiator. But it tried at least.

    I have no idea why movies and TV series set during the Middle Ages seem to be against colours. We know they were using clothes colouring back then! Having Robin Hood in green would make perfect sense.
  • Posts: 19,339
    The Crowe film is so much better than the 'cash in on Dances with Wolves' Costner version..
  • Posts: 14,896
    barryt007 wrote: »
    The Crowe film is so much better than the 'cash in on Dances with Wolves' Costner version..

    Apart from the BBC series I wonder which version is worse than the Costner one.

  • Posts: 19,339
    Ludovico wrote: »
    barryt007 wrote: »
    The Crowe film is so much better than the 'cash in on Dances with Wolves' Costner version..

    Apart from the BBC series I wonder which version is worse than the Costner one.

    I dont think there is one...its so Hollywood...such a shame that an acting legend like Morgan Freeman got involved in it.

  • Posts: 14,896
    The Costner version is also and especially so un-British. The BBC version is too modern in a dumb, lazy way.
  • Posts: 19,339
    Totally right...
  • AWMAWM
    Posts: 156
    Robin Of Sherwood returned last year as an audio episode with more to come this year.
    https://spitefulpuppet.com/shopp.php
  • Posts: 14,896
    Another huge mistake of the BBC version: making Guy of Gisburn better looking and sexier than the hero...
  • Posts: 19,339
    Just watching 'Robin Hood - Men in Tights'....very funny,typical Mel Brooks...great cast as well,love Dom De Luise as a Marlon Brando Godfather baddie...
  • Posts: 14,896
    The BBC Robin Hood is one of the reasons why I think a "period piece" Bond series would not work, or rather would be messed up terribly. That and their take on the Arthurian Legend with Merlin, etc.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Bond set in the times of Robin Hood would be a laugh.
  • edited May 2017 Posts: 2,903
    I'm shocked that no one has mentioned two of the best Robin Hood films ever made:

    Alan Dwan and Douglas Fairbanks's Robin Hood (1922) starts slowly, but the opulence of the production puts every later version in its shadow. The castle was perhaps the largest set ever constructed for a motion picture, and Fairbanks was ideally cast, being the definitive swashbuckler--even James Bond was influenced by him, as Fleming tells us in You Only Live Twice.

    Richard Lester's Robin and Marian (1976) features what might be Sean Connery's greatest performance, and it tackles what no other film of the legend has--the old age and death of Robin Hood. A superbly elegiac and moving film, with music by John Barry and a dream cast: Nicol Williamson, Audrey Hepburn as Maid Marian, Ian Holm, Richard Harris, and Robert Shaw (Red Grant himself!) as the fatalistic, weary Sheriff of Nottingham.
  • Posts: 1,162
    Revelator wrote: »
    I'm shocked that no one has mentioned two of the best Robin Hood films ever made:

    Alan Dwan and Douglas Fairbanks's Robin Hood (1922) starts slowly, but the opulence of the production puts every later version in its shadow. The castle was perhaps the largest set ever constructed for a motion picture, and Fairbanks was ideally cast, being the definitive swashbuckler--even James Bond was influenced by him, as Fleming tells us in You Only Live Twice.

    Richard Lester's Robin and Marian (1976) features what might be Sean Connery's greatest performance, and it tackles what no other film of the legend has--the old age and death of Robin Hood. A superbly elegiac and moving film, with music by John Barry and a dream cast: Nicol Williamson, Audrey Hepburn as Maid Marian, Ian Holm, Richard Harris, and Robert Shaw (Red Grant himself!) as the fatalistic, weary Sheriff of Nottingham.

    A most excellent and touching movie with Connery showing all of his truly impressive range.
    There are parts in the movie he is hilarious funny and then extremely moving when trying to cope with his age.
    Those of you who think Craig is the best actor ever to play Bond should watch this movie.
    Maybe it will give you food for thought.
  • Posts: 14,896
    Even nowadays we can find very little about the Pif Gadget series online, but this gives you an idea:

    http://www.bedetheque.com/serie-17142-BD-Robin-les-exploits-de.html

    http://seulementbd.blogspot.co.uk/2017/02/robin-des-bois-integrale-01-06-vaillant.html

    It was really a gem of a series, heavily influenced by the Errol Flynn version.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Robin Hood aka Locksley is also one of the chatacters in Sir Walter Scott s Ivanhoe.
  • Posts: 14,896
    Robin Hood aka Locksley is also one of the chatacters in Sir Walter Scott s Ivanhoe.

    Oh yes!
  • stagstag In the thick of it!
    edited June 2017 Posts: 1,053
    Richard Greene was the best RH - I haven't read through the thread, but I'm guessing it's already been mentioned Sir Sean and his son Jason also played the part?

    Back to Greene, his series had the best theme tune:

  • Posts: 14,896
    I'd say Errol Flynn was the greatest.
  • edited June 2017 Posts: 11,425
    barryt007 wrote: »
    Btw does anyone know the real reason Costner couldnt be arsed to use an English accent in 'Prince of Thieves' ?
    Is it purely because he didnt think he could do it ?...a major cop-out.

    Costner's Prince of Thieves is highly entertaining. Don't care about his accent at all. It's not that kind of film.

    Russell Crowe's version was an abomination.

    There was a great ITV series in the 1980s as well. At least it seemed great when I was a kid.

    Went downhill tho when the main actor headed off to the U.S. and Connery's son took over the lead role.
  • Posts: 14,896
    No idea what Costner's version was about but it was certainly not about Robin Hood! Unless Robin Hood was meant to be an unheroic American everyman. At least Russell Crowe has the stature to play a hero. And Cate Blanchett was in it.
  • Posts: 19,339
    I personally prefer Crowe's version over Costner's by a long way,

    As for the TV series,it was Michael Praed who was Robin,with his long black hair.
    He is in the British soap 'Emmerdale' now,with short ,totally grey hair - how time flies !!

    And,i always loved the young Ray Winstone in that series,he certainly did well for himself afterwards as well.

    Brilliant series,great to watch,and a great theme and score : "Robin.....the hooded man !"..
  • edited June 2017 Posts: 6,432
    Robin Hood is one myth I could not quite appreciate, studied Greek and Norse Mytholog and love Arthurian legend. I can't really think of an interpretation of Robin Hood that I think is particularly good, I suppose Robin and Marian for obvious reasons.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    Ever since the first ballads about Robyn Hode were written down in the 14th century, Little John was a presence. Marian, Friar Tuck and Alan-a-Dale were first introduced late in the 18th century. There are some very old songs about Robin and Marian, but they have nothing to do with Robin Hood. Au contraire, it was these songs that inspired the inclusion of Maid Marian in the mythos.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger Das Boot Hill
    Posts: 45,489
    It was Antony Munday s theatre play from 1598, The Downfall of Robert, Earle of Huntigdon that first placed Robin Hood back in the 12th Century, alongside King Richard Lionheart and Prince John.
Sign In or Register to comment.