James Bond novelizations

edited October 2023 in Literary 007 Posts: 19
If someone has the Christopher Wood e-books released by Ian Fleming Publications (James Bond and Moonraker and James Bond, The Spy Who Loved Me), please send me a PM. Thanks.

Comments

  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,732
    Just get them cheap on eBay, man.
    Also, this thread will be toast soon. An FYI.
  • Posts: 7,653
    Spend the money on the books instead of getting a freebie. Which is a surprising question by a James Bond fan.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    We used to have some things called " Libraries " where you could get books, on loan.
    Sadly most have been closef.
  • chrisisallchrisisall Brosnan Defender Of The Realm
    Posts: 17,732
    We used to have some things called " Libraries " where you could get books, on loan.
    Sadly most have been closed.

    I remember those!
  • I have the print versions, just wanted to get e-versions as well. Unfortunately, the latter are not available anymore. That's why I asked.
  • Posts: 14,935
    We used to have some things called " Libraries " where you could get books, on loan.
    Sadly most have been closef.

    I actually found TSWLM's novelization in a library ages ago. First Bond novel I read, before I read Ian Fleming. All things considered Christopher Wood did a decent job injecting some Fleming elements in a story that was more a scifi extravaganza than anything else. I was actually disappointed when I saw the movie.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    I remember buying them, from a school book club. Long ago. :)
  • edited October 2023 Posts: 4
    Which came first? WLD or LTK?

    Does anyone know the pub dates of both books? I keep finding conflicting info. Does anyone have any definitive proof about which book came first?

    Thank you.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited October 2023 Posts: 18,015
    I think WLOD came first and then LTK was published next. I have a feeling the release date of the LTK novelisation might be mentioned in issue 20 of 007 Magazine (LTK Special), the publication of the then British James Bond Fan Club. I know that that issue reviewed the LTK novelisation and I seem to recall it mentioning its release earlier on in the introduction section of the issue. I think it mentions the order WLOD and LTK were released in this introductory section. That would be in the UK anyway. I could be wrong and I need to check that issue again though I sadly don't have it to hand at the minute. I'll conduct some further research in the meantime.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    edited October 2023 Posts: 23,843
    The title of this thread was changed to accommodate all novelization discussions.

    @BondFan666, your question was merged with this thread, along with @Dragonpol's answer.
  • My friends US copy of LTK has an advertisement for WLD with some version of the phrase coming soon . Which suggests that LTK came first in the States. Or was at least intended to come first. Not definitive proof of it. But also curious how it worked in UK and which came first there.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,306
    As I've said before, Ian Fleming Publications should take better care of the Bond movie novelizations. Christopher Wood's TSWLM and JB&MR adaptions should be put together in one book. Same with John Gardner's LTK and GE. And a trilogy pack for Raymond Benson's adaptations, with one of his short stories. There's strong material in these. Also the Bond On Set books should be re-released, into one volume, if Greg Williams isn't doing anymore. People need to read more about James Bond outside of the Ian Fleming novel series!

    I think that now that Daniel Craig is done, and all of his movies connect, they should write them into one big novel. They could write it Moonraker style, with each movie being the day of week, in style to MR. An author that could write it would be Bruce Feirstein. He's had success with writing Bond movies and video games, why not give him a big book to try? He could even put in Bloodstone, as that's his work as well. I know it would possibly be over 1,000 pages, but the films were successful enough for an average reader to be interested. A great title for it would be Once Upon a Spy.

    Here’s a possible controversial opinion: the following Bond media should have gotten novelizations: Roald Dahl writing a YOLT book, someone from EA for NightFire, Bruce Feirstein or Raymond Benson for Everything or Nothing, and Jeffery Deaver or John Logan for Skyfall. These Bond adventures deserved to be in print as well. They would have worked well as books. Raymond Benson has done video game novels after Bond. Bruce Feirstein would work best with his material and we could have gotten another Adult Bond novel in the 6 year gap.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited October 2023 Posts: 18,015
    BondFan666 wrote: »
    My friends US copy of LTK has an advertisement for WLD with some version of the phrase coming soon . Which suggests that LTK came first in the States. Or was at least intended to come first. Not definitive proof of it. But also curious how it worked in UK and which came first there.

    I've consulted the book The Schøyen Collection Ian Fleming and James Bond (Adrian Harrington, 2020) by John Gilbert which I acquired recently. On page 157 it has the following information on the Licence to Kill novelisation:

    "Licence to Kill is bibliographically complex; the trade hardback of this title was issued simultaneously in the United Kingdom and America, hence both £sterling and $dollar prices appear on the front flap. The print run was evidently rather small.

    The British version of the trade edition was published in April 1989 and has a cancelled title-page; the 'Collector' edition (bound in dark blue cloth) and the 'Signed Limited' edition (bound in burgundy cloth) followed in May, both these cloth versions being printed in America with integral title pages."


    Gilbert places the LTK novelisation after the WLOD novel chronologically in this book.
  • thedovethedove hiding in the Greek underworld
    Posts: 5,139
    My 1989 paperback from Coronet Books of LTK shows the following books as been written by Gardner:
    • Licence Renewed
    • For Special Services
    • Icebreaker
    • Role of Honour
    • No Deals Mister Bond
    • Nobody Lives Forever
    • Scorpius

    My copy says "First published in Great Britain in 1989 by Coronet Books."

    The back of the book as a teaser for the following titles: Scorpius, Role of Honour and Nobody Lives Forever.
  • Thanks for checking. That seems to indicate that LTK came first. Of course, publishing plans vs reality can be different. (Does it happen to list the month of publication? Probably not.)

    The American LTK has an ad for WLD at the back of it. That also seems to indicate that LTK came first.

    But most sources suggest WLD came first, including IFP. It's also how Gilbert lists it. I wouldn't think they would be mistaken.
  • thedovethedove hiding in the Greek underworld
    edited October 2023 Posts: 5,139
    I should have mentioned my LTK soft cover was purchased in Canada, though I am sure we'd be the same as the US.

    My Win, Lose or Draw hardcover funnily enough doesn't list LTK.

    It has the following at the front of the book:
    • Scorpius
    • No Deals Mister Bond
    • Nobody Lives Forever
    • Role of Honour
    • Icebreaker
    • For Special Services
    • Licence Renewed

    At the back flap it states the following:

    "John Gardner is the author of many suspense novels, including the epic Secret Generations trilogy. Win, Lose or Die is his eighth contribution to the James Bond cycle"

    I italicized not in the original copy

    Wonder why it was called a cycle?
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 18,015
    I imagine that cycle is just another word for "series" as in John Gardner's Bond continuation novel series as opposed to the Fleming originals.
  • edited October 2023 Posts: 4
    My US hardcovers by Putnam don't mention any of the novelizations. Even COLD doesn't mention LTK or GE novelizations.

    My GE novelization by Boulevard does mention LTK.

    My LTK novelization by Charter has an ad for WLD in it and it says Coming Soon.

    I would love to find a UK review for WLD which would indicate a pub date.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited October 2023 Posts: 18,015
    BondFan666 wrote: »
    My US hardcovers by Putnam don't mention any of the novelizations. Even COLD doesn't mention LTK or GE novelizations.

    My GE novelization by Boulevard does mention LTK.

    My LTK novelization by Charter has an ad for WLD in it and it says Coming Soon.

    I would love to find a UK review for WLD which would indicate a pub date.

    I have a review of WLOD from the satirical British magazine Private Eye (dated Friday 4 August 1989, page 24) and entitled "Moonraking it in" which I've sent you a copy of.

    I notice that the review of the LTK novelisation appeared in issue 20 of 007 Magazine while the review of WLOD appeared in issue 21, suggesting LTK possibly came out before WLOD in the UK. Of course issue 20 was the LTK special so they may have wanted to include the LTK novelisation in it first.
  • DragonpolDragonpol https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 18,015
    I had a look at my US Charter paperback edition of the LTK novelisation and it says it was published in June 1989. The US Berkley edition of WLOD says that the Putnam US first edition was published in July 1989. So in the US at least that is proof that the LTK novelisation was printed a month before the WLOD novel. As @BondFan666 stated above at the back of the LTK novelisation there is an advertisement for the WLOD novel stating that it is "Coming Soon In Hardcover" from G.P. Putnam's Sons. This would further indicate that the LTK novelisation came out before WLOD in the US.
  • thedovethedove hiding in the Greek underworld
    Posts: 5,139
    Is there a literary snobbery to novelizations? That somehow because they are based on somebody else's story that they somehow require less skill? Gardner had to jump through from impressive hoops for the LTK and GE novelizations. LTK, Leiter already eaten by a wild animal once before, GE a male M turning to a female M, etc.

    I find it interesting that the flaps of the books don't mention the novelizations. I believe the last novelization was DAD? Why did IFP stop having them happen?
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,306
    John Gardner's website used to have an interview he did with Raymond Benson where they discussed each of the Gardner books up to SeaFire. It's not there anymore but can be found using the WayBack machine. The LTK section has an interesting quote:
    "[The Licence to Kill novelisation] was a one-off idea, and I thought it might be fun. It wasn't. I did it, but I wouldn't want to do it again. I should've known... I started working on it and the screenplay changed daily. I would get phone calls saying "John, scenes 230-235 are out, and new pages are being couried to you." It drove me mad. (Since the time of this interview, Gardner agreed to write the novelisation of GoldenEye, but on his terms. He accepted the assignment on the condition that he have more freedom to "add and subtract" what he wanted and not be held to the screenplay during shooting.)"
    This probably explains why the GoldenEye novelisation feels closer to the film than LTK. He didn't have an original novel out in 1995 so, with no deadline from Glidrose/IFP to worry about, maybe he had the freedom to wait until the final script was locked in. Though clearly he wrote it before filming was finished considering Admiral Chuck hasn't been changed from American to Canadian. And maybe that "add and subtract" bit explains why Xenia's red Ferrari is yellow in the book.

    This interview does make me think that DC's novels could have been novelizations. Scripts are changing all the time, while the novelization author could have a few original ideas of their own.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    edited October 2023 Posts: 15,623
    There are a few I’d like to see novelised. I think Octopussy could make a decent spy adventure: there’s a touch of grit to that story which I think a novel could really turn up.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 4,306
    mtm wrote: »
    There are a few I’d like to see novelised. I think Octopussy could make a decent spy adventure: there’s a touch of grit to that story which I think a novel could really turn up.

    I find it ironic that you bring up OHMSS in the OP thread. Originally, it was going to tie back to the mission, with Octopussy wanting to help her with her vendetta against Blofeld and Spectre. She would have been a villain. It still could be a storyline of sorts in the future. As stated above and in the novelizations thread, Octopussy would truly be an interesting choice, that could still be done today. Surprisingly, TMWTGG would be another interesting one to adapt. The author could have more time to build on the interesting ideas in the script that film production didn't.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 15,623
    I don’t know if you’d need to use ideas from earlier drafts as the story we got is strong enough I think. But it’s an interesting separate idea: novelisations of script variations that were never made, that could be fun.
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