SPECTRE - Press reviews and personal reviews (BEWARE! Spoiler reviews allowed)

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  • edited October 2015 Posts: 11,119
    Isn't this lovely? Dutch kids get the chance of asking the stars of "SPECTRE" questions about the new James Bond film. The interview is part of the "NOS Jeugdjournaal" (which is the children's version of the TV News from state broadcaster NOS. The interview was done by Lucas, presenter of the "Zapp Weekjournaal".

    The videos in the link are entirely English, with Dutch subtitles :-). Especially Christoph Waltz is so cute when he talks to a children's audience:
    http://nos.nl/artikel/2064903-bond-acteur-craig-rijden-in-de-aston-is-het-mooist.html

    Lucas with Daniel Craig (full interview):
    http://jeugdjournaal.nl/item/862364-wat-is-het-succes-achter-james-bond.html

    Lucas with Monica Bellucci (full interview):
    http://jeugdjournaal.nl/item/862380-lucas-interviewt-monica-bellucci.html

    Lucas with Christoph Waltz (full interview):
    http://jeugdjournaal.nl/item/862385-lucas-interviewt-christoph-waltz.html

    Lucas with Sam Mendes (full interview):
    http://jeugdjournaal.nl/item/862446-interview-met-regisseur-sam-mendes.html
  • ThomasCrown76ThomasCrown76 Augusta, ks
    Posts: 757
    Well Daniel Craig is in it. He plays a guy named James Bond.
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 1,068
    Watching Spectre on Tuesday, remarkably I know little about the film.

    You're not really in the right place here then if you want to stay green to everything SPECTRE!! Lots of images and clips with stills to show key scenes... :D


    You're doing a fantastic collation of reviews that I'm sure is appreciated by anyone reading this topic @Gustav_Graves!!
  • Posts: 1,552
    JCRendle wrote: »
    sometimes they mark 3-stars reviews with "Rotten" and other 3-stars reviews with "Fresh", which is inaccurate if you ask me.
    It depends on the tone of the review - you they count the more positive 3 stars as fresh and the more negative 3 stars as rotten as they fall in the middle of the pack, which is fairer I think.

    Could be, but that's entirely subjective no? 3-star review for me is a 3-star review. And not a 3-star review with a 4-star tone or a 2-star tone.
    problem being that a 3 star review is directly between 1 and 5 - neither positive nor negative, more "neutral"

  • Posts: 11,119
    JCRendle wrote: »
    JCRendle wrote: »
    sometimes they mark 3-stars reviews with "Rotten" and other 3-stars reviews with "Fresh", which is inaccurate if you ask me.
    It depends on the tone of the review - you they count the more positive 3 stars as fresh and the more negative 3 stars as rotten as they fall in the middle of the pack, which is fairer I think.

    Could be, but that's entirely subjective no? 3-star review for me is a 3-star review. And not a 3-star review with a 4-star tone or a 2-star tone.
    problem being that a 3 star review is directly between 1 and 5 - neither positive nor negative, more "neutral"

    This is how I usually see it. There are really 11 possibilities with a 0 out of 5 stars rating system. And even then, the 2.5 stars IMO is the one and only 'neutral' rating:

    5 possibilities for a "Rotten" rating:
    00.0 stars
    00.5 stars
    01.0 stars
    01.5 stars
    02.0 stars
    02.5 stars

    5 possibilities for a "Fresh" rating:
    03.0 stars
    03.5 stars
    04.0 stars
    04.5 stars
    05.0 stars
  • Posts: 6,432
    @andmcit with glazed eyes I scrolled right to the end of the comments. General consensus seems positive, that's what I was looking for.
    :-bd
  • Posts: 4,622
  • CatchingBulletsCatchingBullets facebook.com/catchingbullets
    edited October 2015 Posts: 288
    SPOILERS!

    “The dead are alive” whispers a humble caption as an audacious and sinister opening shot soars, swoops and tracks into one of Bond’s greatest opening overtures. As a lone figure pushes through a pulsing exodus of Day of the Dead carnival goers, it’s Samedi Night Fever on the streets of Mexico City. Spinning senoritas, sexy La Catrinas and cadavarious cads jostle and party in a glorious and ghoulish ‘one take’ melange of remembrance and skulduggery. Pinned to one ‘continuous’ and brilliantly mounted five minute take, Hoyte Van Hoytema’s camera finds our man James and his corpse bride already embroiled in a deadly hunt of cat and louse. Cue all manner of roof hopping, cuff shooting and a remembrance funday the likes of which Craig’s Bond has never done before with such zest, scope and ball-busting ambition. With Tambuco’s pounding percussion, Chris Corbould’s wholly logical special effects, Jamy Temime’s bravura costume design and Gary Powell’s heart-pounding stunt work – these are department heads at the utter peak of their Bond game. And this is just the first ten minutes of Spectre. Not even that. But already this breathless, apocalypse wow of a helicopter fight over the Zócalo puts this movie’s opening gambit up there with any Union Jack parachute or jetpack escape.

    That playful sense of relief and victory has been absent from the Craig era. It doesn’t sit with the internal dramatics and renovated psyche of our man James. But in Spectre these opening heroics are fierce, epic and nail bitingly victorious. Craig and director Sam Mendes utterly earn that moment when Sam Smith’s mid Sixties strings fire like familiar harpoon guns into a John Barry-savvy ocean and Daniel Kleinman’s inky titles begin their wraithlike dance. As writhing snakes form the cornea of an eye, eye sockets burn like it’s 1973 and Live and Let Die all over again and Kleinman pays apt reverence to Salvador Dali multiple eye motif (from Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound), Spectre’s notion of surveillance and watching is readily apparent. The turbulent wake behind a speeding bullet becomes the tentacles of an octopus that grips, smothers and seduces; and a naked Daniel Craig stares at the audience as various hands and arms flail for his attention (in a homo-baiting visual not totally dissimilar to a topless, faceless George Lazenby in a OHMSS teaser poster). As the titles make one of cinema’s most utterly reassuring declarations that once again “Albert R. Broccoli’s Eon Productions presents”, a million shards of glass do indeed haunt Bond from his past when the Ghosts of Bond Films Past twist and remind like story phantoms. Contrary to some of the naysayers bashing Sam Smith, it is a wholly fresh notion to cast a male vocalist and a pained love song that retracts the traditional and bombastic momentum of a Bond song with a quiet falsetto or three (Communard Bond anyone?!).

    And before you know it, we’re back through that double tufted leather door and Ralph Fiennes’ vexed M bashing Bond for being a Guardian headline. The world’s security agencies and MI6’s Double O Section are allegedly at a crossroads – a cyber sea-change in an ever prescient world of refugees, holiday resort terrorism and identity theft. The rigid, Apprentice contestant sneering of newcomer Andrew Scott and his bureaucratic Max Denbigh are flagging up change for everything that M and Bond know . A new shared surveillance network called Nine Eyes proposes replacing agents in the field with “drones” and previously guarded nations will rather spuriously now “share” information. The thrust of Spectre is utter Edward Snowden and his damaging and downright petrifying claims about government surveillance techniques. This is not surprising for Eon and this particular Bond film. Producer Barbara Broccoli currently has her film making sights on Glenn Greenwald’s Pulitzer Prize winning book, No Place to Hide – Edward Snowden, the NSA and The Surveillance State. In Spectre the NSA is the fictional CNS – the Centre for National Security – or perhaps a rather dubiously managed central nervous system rife for abuse and personal intrusion. Once again out on his own and saddled with diktats from above that even M cannot stop, Bond must not only pursue the mission he is already on when the film starts, he must also do so with the least interaction with the home side.

    In Spectre there is a wonderful stuck in boarding school during the holidays dynamic about the M, Moneypenny, Q and Tanner foursome. With Denbigh pitched as Spectre’s blinkered and dangerously naïve Ofsted inspector, Fiennes beleaguered, but principled turn as MI6’s headmaster is one of the film’s highlights. Still imbued with that ex-army, Northern Irish veteran life alluded to in Skyfall, Fiennes’ M is a fiercely principled man, defending with pride the skills of “my quartermaster” and of course top agent, Bond. Echoing one of Bond’s educations in 2008’s Quantum of Solace and probably the key thrust of Spectre, Fiennes firmly believes “a licence to kill means knowing when not to kill”. Playing down some of the near idiot savant tics of the character in Skyfall, Ben Whishaw’s Q relaxes his quartermaster into a supporter of 007. Less cool and aloof geek, he is now more Airbnb savvy hipster getting himself embroiled in a perilous field trip with only the thinnest of escape options.

    One almost passing moment of M dining alone (at Rules – Covent Garden’s real dining refuge as featured in the spy worlds of writers Graham Greene and John Le Carre) is so well pitched as an out of hours Moneypenny and Q show concern for Bond, the mission and their careworn boss. Once again London is a support character in Spectre. But this is a very different London to that so gloriously used in 2012’s Skyfall and the wake of the Jubilee and the Olympics. This is a London for loners. Bond lives alone in a decidedly sparse apartment, M is on the lamb with only a meagre holdall of his possessions, Q operates into the early hours out of his own refuge, Moneypenny walks down empty streets at night and MI6’s abandoned base at Vauxhall now cuts a lonely, derelict sight.

    Cut to an Italian job in Rome and a funeral rendezvous with Monica Bellucci’s striking and life worn widow, Lucia Sciarra. “Can’t you see I’m grieving?” she barks as Bond’s coy “No, I can’t” is not long followed by quite a passionate bout of Catholic baiting nooky. Not even the Pope could absolve Bond of his sins now. Spectre is a decidedly passionate film. After Lea Seydoux’s Dr Madeleine Swann and Bond are embroiled in a highly brutal train fight with Dave Bautista’s burly Hinx, an urgent instrumental version of Sam Smith’s title song spills into what is a really passionate embrace and a great Roger Moore inspired answer to “well, what do we do now?”.

    A long time casting wish for the Bond camp, Monica Bellucci’s presence is a beguiling, but all too brief one. It is a slither of an appearance, but one that sets the film up for one of its masterstrokes – the reintroduction of criminal organisation, Spectre. One gate-crashing bout of Bond’s best Italian language skills later and it’s For Your Eyes Wide Shut as Bond infiltrates a cult-framed criminal summit – a ruthless enclave of vengeful business and the minutes of terrorism. Fearful accountants attempt buoying up middling business success, murderous assignments are tendered out to the most tender-less of candidates and one particular new board member makes a viciously violent play on the phrase ‘by the pricking of my thumbs’. And there is a microphone. And a tannoy. There is no monorail alas, but in a world of mass cyber communication it is refreshing to see how a starter business like Spectre still relies on a pointed microphone. On a stand.

    Actually, Spectre the film is refreshingly tech-free. All keyboard tapping intrigue is kept to a minimum, a trickling line of spilt beer is as good a way of finding hidden rooms these days, a secret hand gesture rather than a retina scan gets you into villains lairs, an alpine clinic demands all phones and guns to be handed over upon arrival and the DB10 is not fully fledged just yet (but it does boast a Frank Sinatra cd – in a possible nod to one of Cubby Broccoli’s close pals). In the best John Glen era swagger, Bond is very much “on his own this time” as the story and M require Bond to not communicate with anyone.

    And so to Christoph Waltz. Alongside Javier Bardem, the double Oscar winner was the Bond films must-have villain. The National Theatre of Eon now has its most apt actor to nail that necessary sense of European villainy so memorably pioneered in the SPECTRE-bound likes of From Russia with Love and Thunderball. As Franz Oberhauser, Waltz crafts a very still and quietly calculating nemesis. Nothing however quite matches that doom-ladened boardroom entrance as Oberhauser drops the name “James” into the minutes with foreboding precision. In sockless slippers, humdrum slacks and a Nehru suit jacket he refuses to properly button up, Oberhauser emerges almost as an aloof Jeremy Corbyn at a seaside conference. Possibly disadvantaged with constant references to previous Bond villains, Oberhauser may also ultimately emerge as somewhat of a lesser force. He certainly upholds Dr. No’s skills at picking the right dress size for his visiting Bond women, Rosa Klebb’s ability to sour a hotel room for guests and Helga Brandt’s penchant for torture (the Craig era does love to strap its lead to a chair). Obviously the elephant in Spectre’s room is 007’s most famous adversary. But if anything this film is about the children of Spectre – the next generation of flame keepers. And flame throwers. It is a sinister beat when Bond and Swann are in separate rooms at Oberhauser’s Moroccan base and are unnerved to see framed photos on the walls of their childhoods.

    The lurking white cat that is Mr White has been sauntering under the radar for three Bond movies now. The Austrian scenes between Jesper Christensen’s White and Bond are one of Spectre’s triumphs. Once again Christensen drags with him a Jacob Marley sense of impending, inescapable doom. But there is now a conscience and a resignation to his fate and actions. Rather than wholly using the Hannes Oberhauser strand of Ian Fleming’s 1966 short story collection Octopussy & The Living Daylights as expected, it is Mr White who is afforded writers John Logan, Robert Wade, Neal Purvis and Jez Butterworth nod to the source material. Instead of Octopussy’s father in the 1983 film being provided with an honourable alternative to court martialling and an ashamed death, it is now Mr White in a scene that comes back to haunt Bond in quite a marked, devilish way.

    There is of course more Fleming DNA weaved throughout this Bond bullet. An unused Fleming title is finally put to good use, Fleming’s great nephew Tam Williams plays an all-important, but faceless lover and a torture scene lifts directly from Kingsley Amis’s 1968 continuation Bond novel, Colonel Sun.

    And talking of Mr White and taking one of Roger Moore’s Bond Women tropes of the 1980s, Spectre has a lot of Daddy issues. Lea Seydoux’s ele-quaint Dr Madeleine Swann is the estranged daughter of White – a White Swann of haunted memories, divorced parents, a hatred of weaponry alongside an acute understanding of it and a striking love for Commander Bond. And Franz himself is clearly blaming his father and his relationships for his life choices. But the one figure who is refreshingly free of such familial angst is James Bond himself. The much touted back story of the Oberhausers and a teenage James are almost superfluous to Spectre. This then leaves Craig’s 007 to utterly enjoy the Bond ride in the first of his four films (to date) which is just a fun mission.

    One of the successes of Spectre is how it reinstates – and earns – that Bond swagger. As composer Thomas Newman’s choir and Vatican establishing shots fanfare that Bond Arrives ™ moment, this twenty-fourth 007 bullet is peppered with joyous beats. This is a Bond film with abundant champagne on ice, an alpine clinic with remote control shutters, a rather useful watch and a real lack of second unit domination. And that unashamed heterosexuality is back. Quite right. Craig’s Bond has not yet bedded a Bond woman who stays with him as the end credits hit. There is even space for not one, but two ‘c’ word gags. That potty mouthed Judi Dench and her Skyfall expletives have a lot to answer for.

    Sam Mendes second spin of the dice is less the bespoke, mahogany hued world of Skyfall. The Mexico City scenes have a contemporary immediacy to them whilst conversely the Morocco scenes aboard a vintage train and later in the desert reek of Agatha Christie movies as an anachronistically dressed Bond and Swann await an appointment with death. Cue EON Productions Chauffeur Complex (and one close to the heart of Catching Bullets – Memoirs of a Bond Fan). Nearly every Bond film features a suited chauffeur. Spectre is no different as an approaching and beautiful Rolls Royce Wraith shimmers out of a desert mirage like a wheeled Omar Shariff.

    Talking of Lawrence of Arabia, there is a marked nod to David Lean in Spectre. Pursuing the hot and cold motif of Mexico and Morocco versus the freezing climes of Austria, Hoyte Van Hoytema’s cinematography has the romantic visual sweep of Doctor Zhivago and that duality of ice and sand. Antique trains thread through the desert, shadows are thrown at Spectre HQ like Ken Adam drapes and aerial shots show Bond and London from the eye of an eagle. Hoyte’s work here underpins one of the most deceptively romantic looking of Bond movies. Freddie Young (who shot Zhivago, Lawrence and 1967’s You Only Live Twice) would be proud. The dusty hues of Mexico City are awash with that key marigold Day of the Dead colour and Rome is suitably romanticised and Catholicised with candle-light auburns and oranges.

    This is not a 007 adventure that feels the need to keep the action plate spinning. Casino Royale was sometimes fearful of its central card game motif so threaded in constant physical peril and stairwell skirmishes. The action beats in Spectre are all pinned to the story. As in Skyfall, the stunts inform the story not pause it. Gravity is the action motif here – the gravity of Bond sliding down a crumbling Mexican wall onto an abandoned sofa, the gravity of a fiercely realised fist fight aboard an out of control helicopter, the gravity of a wingless plane chasing a fleet of jeeps down an Austrian mountain on nothing but momentum, the gravity of a playful parachute descent in Rome and the gravity of a last act jump off an exploding building.

    From Pale Kings to pain authors, Spectre is a breathless triumph that breathes, thrills, romances and glows with a sinister, retro pride. It is Mendes’ Kubrickian opera of baroque quirks, wit and deliberately strange imagery.

    Many thanks to EON Productions.

    Spectre is released nationwide in the UK on Monday 26th October and 6th November in the US.

    This writing was originally posted on www.markoconnell.co.uk
  • Posts: 6,601
    Not bad

    Tiger WoodsVerified account ‏@TigerWoods 19h19 hours ago
    Thanks to @007 for the private screening with family and friends. #Spectre was incredible.
  • mcdonbbmcdonbb deep in the Heart of Texas
    Posts: 4,116
    Germanlady wrote: »
    Not bad

    Tiger WoodsVerified account ‏@TigerWoods 19h19 hours ago
    Thanks to @007 for the private screening with family and friends. #Spectre was incredible.

    That's about par
    :P
  • BondJasonBond006BondJasonBond006 on fb and ajb
    Posts: 9,021
    Although I wanted to stay on leave until after Spectre I'm popping in again (I can't help it :)) ) to give you this:

    After Switzerland's most important newspapers (Tages-Anzeiger) already had an unusually very good 5 star review for Spectre (they are very critical and it takes something to get such a review) now the most read Swiss newspaper 20Min (a free newspaper read by the whole Swiss working-force that travels per public transportation)
    has published a great review for Spectre as well.

    Here is the link (of course it's written in German) for the people that master the language.
    20min.ch/entertainment/kino/story/Ein-Bond-Spektakel-erster-Guete-18223440

    Titled: A first-class Bond spectacle!
    Excerpts from the review translated by me:
    A slam-dunk from every point of view. The most spectacular pre-title-sequence ever. A very well shaken cocktail. It's a real treat to watch Daniel Craig.
    A spectacle worth watching.
    Some reviews hold unfair criticism against the movie. It wouldn't be clear what inner forces drive James Bond, or that the story wasn't believable enough.
    If I may, if Bond would ever fully expose his inner feelings and his soul...nobody would go to see Bond movies anymore and people who are complaining about lack of realism are watching the wrong movie anyway.
    Nobody does it better.
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 203
    SPOILERS!

    “The dead are alive” whispers a humble caption as an audacious and sinister opening shot soars, swoops and tracks into one of Bond’s greatest opening overtures. As a lone figure pushes through a pulsing exodus of Day of the Dead carnival goers, it’s Samedi Night Fever on the streets of Mexico City. Spinning senoritas, sexy La Catrinas and cadavarious cads jostle and party in a glorious and ghoulish ‘one take’ melange of remembrance and skulduggery. Pinned to one ‘continuous’ and brilliantly mounted five minute take, Hoyte Van Hoytema’s camera finds our man James and his corpse bride already embroiled in a deadly hunt of cat and louse. Cue all manner of roof hopping, cuff shooting and a remembrance funday the likes of which Craig’s Bond has never done before with such zest, scope and ball-busting ambition. With Tambuco’s pounding percussion, Chris Corbould’s wholly logical special effects, Jamy Temime’s bravura costume design and Gary Powell’s heart-pounding stunt work – these are department heads at the utter peak of their Bond game. And this is just the first ten minutes of Spectre. Not even that. But already this breathless, apocalypse wow of a helicopter fight over the Zócalo puts this movie’s opening gambit up there with any Union Jack parachute or jetpack escape.

    Bravo! @CatchingBullets Great Review! Thank you! looking forward to next weeks advance screening Nov 4th! Sounds like Bond at its Best!
  • JWPepperJWPepper You sit on it, but you can't take it with you.
    Posts: 497
    I look forward to Calvin Dyson and James Bond Radio review
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe "I need a year off" Craig
    Posts: 7,263
    JWPepper wrote: »
    I look forward to Calvin Dyson and James Bond Radio review

    :)]
  • Pajan005Pajan005 Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts: 432
    As do I @JWPepper We might get our first thoughts from Calvin Dyson later tonight.
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    edited October 2015 Posts: 5,119
    Daniel Craig adds a little 'Moore' to his 4th outing as James Bond, with Mendes creating some of the most stunning cinematography ever featured in the series. The plot is both traditional and unconventional in equal measures, yet the film lacks the darker dramatic edge and enigmatic suaveness of Casino Royale. A little more Fleming required. 8/10. Spoiler flaws - The key villain related to Bond (goes completely against Fleming), Bond is now seemingly uninterested in avenging Vesper and the lighter tone of the film is at odds with CR and QoS even though it is a direct sequel.
  • doubleoegodoubleoego #LightWork
    Posts: 11,090

    SP is a very good Bond film. It utilises the classic elements of the series in a good way. It is flawed and there are some things I didnt like, my major grip being Madeline telling Bond she loves him during the torture scenes. There are a few other things that left me a tad disappointed but on the whole there's much to enjoy.

    I'm no fan of Newman's scores for Bond but his work for SP in the context of the movie worked better than it did for SF for me.

    That being said, I really liked the PTS, I think Smith's song worked well and tge visuals reminded me of a cross between softcover porn and tentacle-rape anime.

    The whole cast were great and Craig was on top form. Confident, slick, self-assured and utterly badass. The action came in abundance and the fights brutal.

    Hinx for me has one of the best introductions not just for a villain but as a character in general. The guy's a monster.

    The build up of the theme leading to the opening gunbarrel really set the mood and tge PTS was phenomenal. One of the best in the series.

    I'd rate it 8.5/10.

    It's better...much better than SF for me but it doesn't top CR.

    CR
    SP
    SF
    QoS

    [/quote]

  • Posts: 582
    SPOILERS! This is a spoiler allowed thread but just to remind you

    Just been to see SPECTRE.

    Wow! What a Bond, definitely a top 5 Bond film. The plot unfolds itself very well, with some nice twists and turns. Nice balance between humour and seriousness. My only real criticism is that I don't really buy that Bond and Swann are in love, there is no real development in their relationship to earn that. The relationship between Bond and Vesper in Casino Royale was much more believable. Also thought Newman's score was way too similiar to his score for Skyfall, wouldn't mind a different composer next time.

    My prediction for Bond 25: Bond is driving his DB5 with Madeleine and she gets shot by Blofeld. Now I've seen the end of the film I can see why Craig was dodging the question of another Bond - I'm pretty sure he'll return with Seydoux and Woltz for Bond25!
  • edited October 2015 Posts: 582
    Also, possibly the best title sequence in the series!
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy N.Ireland
    Posts: 12,007
    Agreed, brilliant titles. =D>
  • Posts: 444
    First impressions...

    Much better and more enjoyable than Skyfall.

    You could say Newman's score was repetitive or acknowledge that he is using character motifs such as 'Close Shave' making a reappearance for Moneypenny.

    LOVED the obvious homages to Dr No, right down to the chair furniture in the guest rooms.

    Just like I thought Bardem was overrated so I think Waltz needs to be talked about more than he is. For the most part he's charming and then there's that flip into malevolence.

    The MI6 crew of M, Q, Tanner and Moneypenny, all brilliant. Glad they were brought into the action.

    Lea Seadoux doesn't have that much to do in all honesty but great screen presence.

    Worst bit: Bond and Madeline's sudden bout of passion after dispatching Hinx. It looked sped up like a Benny Hill moment.

    Best bit: Daniel Craig. Again. He's on fire in this one. Cool, cocky and a nice bit of humour this time.
  • Posts: 444
    doubleoego wrote: »
    Hinx for me has one of the best introductions not just for a villain but as a character in general. The guy's a monster.

    Oh yes. Forgot to mention how brilliant the boardroom scene is. Plenty of shadows and eery silence. Definitely not a meeting a cuckoo wants to get caught in!
  • Posts: 12
    Loved SPECTRE.
    Thought it was hilarious and all the jokes were brilliantly done.
    Ben Whishaw and Lea Seydoux were great in my opinion and Daniel Craig gave another fantastic performance.
    Very interesting end to the movie.
  • How was the humor delivered by Craig? Did it flow like that dry wit in Casino? Or was it forced like Skyfall?
    Thanks in advance.
  • Posts: 1,068
    Of course with adrenaline rushing through you both, what are you going to do when Lea's barely wearing that dress PLUS Bond is in that turning leg to jelly white tux!? The sparks were there all the time with the pair of them together on screen - great chemistry!!
  • Posts: 1,068
    Loudest LOL was M's now we know what C stands for line!!
  • Posts: 1,183
    @andmcit Everyone laughed for that line and briliantly delivered. I loved how Ralph and Andrew acted their scenes out. Really brilliant acting.
    Everyone in the film were at their top notch acting ;)
  • SirHilaryBraySirHilaryBray Scotland
    Posts: 2,138
    The film starts so well. It's fast paced and exciting. I have real problems with the pacing mid way through there is little dilect between Madeleine and Bond. There was a missed opportunity to show more of their relationship blossoming. It's so rushed by the time she tells Bond she loves him it feels like Lupe's moment. It feels like the train scenes have been chopped down. The film shamefully steals from The Dark Knight and Star Trek into Darkness. There are some amazing moments but there is a real lack of dialog and although Skyfall may have been too far on the serious spectrum, Spectre is a swing too far away from the good work done on Dan's 1st 3 outings. When he learns the Pale King is Mr White his reaction is not deep enough it should be more of a disturbing discovery. By the time he finds White he should have executed him for Vesper IMO. Waltz is creepy simply brilliant not comfortable in the link to Bonds childhood it's comic book.. Bellucci under used. I honestly preferred QOS I felt like Spectre was a massive opportunity lost after such a great first hour. It's over ambition. As a massive fan of the Craig era I'm very disappointed with the choice of ending. I thought there was also some real focusing issues on some scenes and over play with fade in fade out shots. Ben Wishaw was fantastic. I did not hate the movie just that pace and balance of story and action was off.

    Dan's most comfortable outing he is ruthless and confident in the role more so than ever. I feel it's a major direction issue a I think Mendes it off more than he could chew.
  • Posts: 1,068
    Best line in the film even if DC didn't say it!!
  • SirHilaryBraySirHilaryBray Scotland
    edited October 2015 Posts: 2,138
    The film starts so well. It's fast paced and exciting. I have real problems with the pacing mid way through there is little dilect between Madeleine and Bond. There was a missed opportunity to show more of their relationship blossoming. It's so rushed by the time she tells Bond she loves him it feels like Lupe's moment. It feels like the train scenes have been chopped down. The film shamefully steals from The Dark Knight and Star Trek into Darkness. There are some amazing moments but there is a real lack of dialog and although Skyfall may have been too far on the serious spectrum, Spectre is a swing too far away from the good work done on Dan's 1st 3 outings. When he learns the Pale King is Mr White his reaction is not deep enough it should be more of a disturbing discovery. By the time he finds White he should have executed him for Vesper IMO. Waltz is creepy simply brilliant not comfortable in the link to Bonds childhood it's comic book.. Bellucci under used. I honestly preferred QOS I felt like Spectre was a massive opportunity lost after such a great first hour. It's over ambition. As a massive fan of the Craig era I'm very disappointed with the choice of ending. I thought there was also some real focusing issues on some scenes and over play with fade in fade out shots. Ben Wishaw was fantastic. I did not hate the movie just that pace and balance of story and action was off.

    Dan's most comfortable outing he is ruthless and confident in the role more so than ever. I feel it's a major direction issue a I think Mendes bit of more than he could chew.

    Continuity issue when Bond gets tagged by the tracker, why is this being explained to him again he had it done in CR
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