Your Ultimate Bond Timeline

1234568»

Comments

  • edited December 2020 Posts: 872
    Love the timeline we currently have for the most part, but in the spirit of the thread;

    1958 - Casino Royale - Cary Grant
    1959 - Live and Let Die - Cary Grant
    1960 - Moonraker - Cary Grant
    1961 - Diamonds Are Forever - Cary Grant
    1962 - From Russia With Love - Cary Grant

    1964 - Dr. No - Richard Burton
    1965 - Goldfinger - Richard Burton
    1966 - Thunderball - Richard Burton

    1968 - The Spy Who Loved Me - Oliver Reed
    1969 - On Her Majesty’s Secret Service - Oliver Reed
    1970 - You Only Live Twice - Oliver Reed
    1971 - The Man With The Golden Gun - Oliver Reed

    That’s all I’ve got. Wanted to keep this strictly Fleming, but free of the short stories.
  • edited December 2020 Posts: 111
    In the what if land scenarios the big ones are the ones that came close to fruition or had some possibility:
    The Young helmed Goldfinger
    Striking a deal with Charlie Feldman and making a true Casino Royale with Sean
    Sean doing OHMSS, Roger doing OHMSS, Young Dalton in OHMSS
    The next film as DAF being the revenge driven gritty film or DAF with John Gavin
    TMWTGG as the original Mankiewicz version with more focus on the Bond-Villain relationship.
    Spy directed by Hamilton
    FYEO directed by Young or Hunt
    Dalton’s third film that should have happened.
    Brosnan getting a proper film to go out on.
    My own: CR ‘06 with Jason Issacs in a proper adaptation of the novel that maintains the film series identity instead of what we wound up with-or a new film entirely.
  • Posts: 566
    In the what if land scenarios the big ones are the ones that came close to fruition or had some possibility:
    The Young helmed Goldfinger
    Striking a deal with Charlie Feldman and making a true Casino Royale with Sean
    Sean doing OHMSS, Roger doing OHMSS, Young Dalton in OHMSS
    The next film as DAF being the revenge driven gritty film or DAF with John Gavin
    TMWTGG as the original Mankiewicz version with more focus on the Bond-Villain relationship.
    Spy directed by Hamilton
    FYEO directed by Young or Hunt
    Dalton’s third film that should have happened.
    Brosnan getting a proper film to go out on.
    My own: CR ‘06 with Jason Issacs in a proper adaptation of the novel that maintains the film series identity instead of what we wound up with-or a new film entirely.

    I will try to develop my own timeline, but these few ideas are very close to what I would have want to see. To be honest, I have a curious fascination with what would have been a DAF starring Gavin.... And, at the same time, I would really like to see Lazenby in a second film, without it necessarily being a direct follow-up to OHMSS.
  • DeathToSpies84DeathToSpies84 Haydock, England
    Posts: 197
    That was a great and inspiriting reading, @DeathToSpies84 ! The door that it opens on an alternate Dalton era is both brillant and frustrating. Wish I would have seen such an alternate timeline. I will try to propose my own take.

    Plus, the plot for POAL is the original one - Sir Henry Lee Ching (Ferguson in my timeline) threatening to unleash a computer virus to cripple every military and commercial system in the world unless Britain withdraws from Hong Kong. I prefer that over the Scimitar stealth fighter plot and the brief Vegas jaunt that the revised draft offered.
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    Oh boy, this is making me sweat... I was thinking my timeline where EON would start in 1951, Casino Royale would come out early in 1952 and the film releasing in September 1952. This is really hard. I’ll be back for this post later so I can refresh my mind! I’ll keep the same actors in our reality, while my reality is a bit different... ;)
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    Here we go.

    CARY GRANT:

    Casino Royale (1952)
    Live and Let Die (1953)
    Moonraker (1954)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1956)
    From Russia With love (1957)
    Dr. No (1958)

    SEAN CONNERY:

    Goldfinger (1960)
    For Your Eyes Only (1961)
    Thunderball (1963) (also produced by Kevin McClory, same twist but shorter)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1965)
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1966)
    You Only Live Twice (1968)

    GEORGE LAZENBY:

    The Man with The Golden Gun (1970)
    Octopussy (1972)
    The Living Daylights (1974)
    The Property of A Lady (1976)
    007 in New York (1979)
    A View To A Kill (1981)
    Risico (1983)

    TIMOTHY DALTON:
    The Hildebrand Rarity (1985)
    Quantum of Solace (1987)
    Colonel Sun (1989)
    The British Spy (1992)
    Nobody Lives Forever (1993)

    PIERCE BROSNAN:

    GoldenEye (1995)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)
    The World is Not Enough (1999)
    The Catastrophe of Espionage (2000) (weird title)
    Die Another Day (2002)
    Everything or Nothing (2003)
    Phoenix Rising (2004) (released earlier in spring)

    DANIEL CRAIG (oh boy, this is too much...):

    The Secret Agent (2005)
    007 in Los Angeles (2006)
    The Facts of Death (2007)
    Death by Climate (2008)
    Honor Amongst Spies (2010)
    Skyfall (2012)
    Spectre (2014)
    High Time To Kill (2017)
    Never Dream of Dying (2019)
    The Last Assignment (Fall 2021)

    HENRY CAVILL (future movies, highly futuristic):
    Forever And The Day (Christmas 2022)
    When The Blood Trickles (2023)
    Some Kind of Spy (2025)
    The Advice to Offer (2027)
    The World With Spies (2029)
    Black and Gold (2031)
    Blood Stone (2033)
    Cold Spy (2035)
    The British Sendup (2037)


    That's all there is to it... ;) Yeah some titles may make a little sense.
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    Birdleson wrote: »
    @kadeklodt Excellent Iowa! Well, you kind of lose me after Brosnan, but I love everything up to that point.

    Thank you! :) I did forget to add Roger Moore
  • Posts: 1,593
    Okay I have never tried this. I'm going to give it a go. This is presuming that Connery is happy and committed to the role, no McClory BS, etc. I'm abiding by some rules, i.e. the age of the actor etc, but otherwise this is a fan exercise -- an ideal timeline/canon for the films.

    With a few huge exceptions if I retain a film with the actor who initially played the role (i.e. FRWL, TB, etc) I'm not going to go WAY geeky and demand that this or that be changed. Would take too long. So generally, aside from some minor changes, those films will remain as-is. I'm also not going to add in too many "new" titles using unfilmed books, although kudos to all of you for using your imagination with those.

    SEAN CONNERY

    Casino Royale (1962) -- dir. Terence Young
    Ever since I saw that opening casino sequence in DN with Connery I have longed to turn back time and see a proper adaptation. This would hew pretty close to Fleming. Maybe inject a bit more action if the minor budget allows. This has plenty enough tension and suspense to be an incredibly suave-yet-gruff espionage thriller.

    From Russia With Love (1963) -- dir. Terence Young
    Pretty much as-is.

    Dr. No (1964) -- dir. Terence Young
    Utilize the fact that in '64 they'd have a much larger budget. Maybe hew a bit closer to the novel, but otherwise I'd just like to see a more blockbuster style version of the film they made on the shoestring budget in '62.

    Moonraker (1965) -- dir. Peter Hunt / Terence Young (co)
    Stick to the book. This is maybe my favorite Fleming book so I'd love to see it adapted. Otherwise, sure, inject it with some cinematic bombast but retain the gist.

    Thunderball (1967) -- dir. Terence Young / Peter Hunt (co)
    BLOFELD TRILOGY. Pretty much as-is, with some improved editing. Connery's a bit older in this time line, but he remains in-shape because he's committed to the role and Saltzmann isn't making him mad or whatever. I read @Birdleson comments and I 100% agree and would do it the same way. Savalas as Blofeld (although he'd likely still be hidden here mostly). WIth a committed Connery (which I'm allowed to have since this is a fantasy) this would be both the perfect send-off for the best Bond actor and undoubtedly the high point of the series. WIth 4 films under his belt audiences would already have embraced that "Sean Connery IS James Bond" as the posters proclaimed etc.

    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) -- dir. Peter Hunt
    As-is. Obviously Connery replaces Lazenby as a mature-looking 007. End titles play "We Have all the Time in the World" instead of blasting the theme.

    You Only Live Twice (1970) -- dir. Peter Hunt
    Adhere to the book. An incredible send-off for Sean. Keep the Garden of Death stuff as psychedelic as the book depicts it. Don't be afraid to get a little weird.


    ROGER MOORE

    Live and Let Die (1972) -- dir. Guy Hamilton
    I still think this is a pretty great introduction for Moore as Bond, so we'll keep most of this. Bit more from the book. Doesn't Felix get mauled in this one (in the novel?). If so, I'd like to see the film depict that, and then for continuity's sake Felix wears a prosthetic from now on. I'd love that. My heart says keep J.W. because I hope that audiences realize we're supposed to be laughing at him and his racism and such rather than with him.

    Diamonds are Forever (1973) -- dir. Guy Hamilton
    So... we have to change some things obviously because Blofeld isn't in the novel, but otherwise I'd like to keep the dark humor and keep this pretty close to how it is. So obviously we change up the villains and such, but I want to keep Wint and Kidd and the tone generally. I think Moore would absolutely kill it.

    The Spy Who Loved Me (1975) -- dir. Lewis Gilbert
    This would be as-is. Iconic stuff. Maybe change the title in case "fake" Eon wants to use the actual novel at some point? Maybe for Broz or Dalton or Craig?

    Goldfinger -- dir. Lewis Gilbert
    So, this is a weird one, because I adore the GF we have, and I love what Hamilton did with it (and thus changed the series forever). So this is in no way me saying I wish the original GF were different, I'm just trying to be realistic about Connery not being able to do THAT many films, and I want to see so many other films with Connery so this is the one that had to move to Moore. Plus, I think Moore would kill it. Let Gilbert give it some more bombast than Hamilton maybe would've, but keep the lightness of touch and sleekness. Let Moore play in "god mode" Bond that he does in the Gilbert directed films. It would fit perfectly.

    "Moonraker" (1979) -- dir. Lewis Gilbert
    So, I need a new title because I used MR already. But I'm bad at titles. And I want the movie pretty much as-is so we get a lot of Gilbert's influence on the series because I love him. Maybe change space to something else? BUt I still want Barry's "journey into space" song.

    Octopussy (1981) -- dir. John Glen
    As-is. Trim some of the more outlandish stuff (you know the stuff if you're on this forum). But otherwise, I love this film's tonal mish-mash. I think it's a great send-off for Moore's Bond. My only main change: give Octopussy as a character more screentime, let their relationship develop a bit more. Let this be a romantic send-off for Moore. She is the only Bond girl in his tenure that I felt he ever truly had great chemistry with.


    TIMOTHY DALTON

    For Your Eyes Only (1983) -- dir. John Glen
    Pretty much as-is. The screenplay would be adjusted slightly to fit Dalton's portrayal a bit more, but otherwise since this is often considered Moore's "serious" Bond film, I think it suits Dalton phenomenally well.

    From A View to a Kill (1985) -- dir. John Glen
    Changing this a lot. Expand on the original story. But I simply cannot live in a world where we don't get May Day and Zorin, so honestly just find a way to shoe-horn them in. I don't care. It's my timeline, lol. Even though I love the film we got for its own weird, old, creaky reasons, I'm fine with changing a lot of this. Just give me Walken and Jones.

    The Living Daylights (1987) -- dir. Martin Campbell
    I have no idea if Campbell was directing films yet, but I maintain that Glen had way too many, and I would've liked to see Campbell do more. We're retaining the majority of this film, but since we're letting Campbell direct we will obviously have a slightly different tone and other changes in directorial tendencies. The action will remain top-notch. Since hindsight is 20-20 let's not have Bond team up with what would come to be known as the Taliban.

    The Hildebrand Rarity (1989) -- dir. Martin Campbell
    I said I wasn't going to use too many "unused" titles but then I realized that because I'm keeping these films on a fairly consistent release schedule, there's going to be so so so many more than there are in reality. Expand on the story.

    Licence to Kill (1991) -- dir. John Glen
    John Glen's swan song as a director, he comes back refreshed after taking a much-needed break. The film has superior production value, and it leans away from its American obsessions since two years have passed since the "real" release date and the producers are no longer trying to replicate American action cinema as much. Less gore. Keep the general tone. Allow the romance to develop more between Bond and Pam (yes, I like sending off the 007s on a positive note). Keep "bless your heart," for god's sake.


    PIERCE BROSNAN

    GoldenEye (1995) -- dir. Martin Campbell
    I'm giving them 4 years instead of 6. Same movie pretty much.

    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) -- dir. John Woo
    Lol, why not. If it's going to have all the ridiculous gonzo action sequences, let Woo take a stab at it rather than Spottiswoode. Keep the cinematographer, though, for the love of god because TND is gorgeous. Bring on the doves. Keep much of the film the same. I think this one has aged fairly well, aside from some of the action. By bringing in Woo I'm just letting this be the wild card in terms of action sequences. We have a different group writing dialogue for these Brosnan films. Idk who. Just, someone to clean up the juvenile stuff.

    Colonel Sun (1999) -- dir. Michael Apted
    Give Apted another shot with a better script. I'm stealing this idea from @Birdleson shamelessly because I think it's excellent. No more TWINE. This will hew pretty close to the book. Judi Dench is M, btw.

    Die Another Day (2001) -- dir. Lee Tamahori
    Yeah, I'm letting Tamahori give it another shot. Again, we have different screenwriters. There's a surprisingly considerable amount of this I'd keep. I like the cast by and large, except let's not change the villain's race so whichever actor they decide to go with, keep that. Halle Berry can stay because there's a much better script remember. I think the "bones" of this plot are quite good things just get ridiculous later on.

    Icebreaker (2003) -- dir. Quentin Tarantino
    Why not. This means he doesn't do Kill Bill, but who cares. Do whatever you want. Change the title, I don't care. Let's see how it goes.

    ----

    I'm tired and ran out of time. I'll throw in Craig's tenure later. What do y'all think?
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 2,135
    It’s nice to see the continuing novels get some love. I feel that EON would have been better off doing that and not using Purvis and Wade “original” material, or Daniel Craig’s only when he wants to make one approach.
  • Die Another Day (2001) -- dir. Lee Tamahori
    Yeah, I'm letting Tamahori give it another shot. Again, we have different screenwriters. There's a surprisingly considerable amount of this I'd keep. I like the cast by and large, except let's not change the villain's race so whichever actor they decide to go with, keep that. Halle Berry can stay because there's a much better script remember. I think the "bones" of this plot are quite good things just get ridiculous later on.

    Ironically it sounds like you want Purvis and Wade's script before Tamahori was brought onboard. Maybe you'd prefer a Die Another Day with Tamahori's excesses reined in? I think that really could have been something. As you say, there's good material in the story. There's good to be found in Tamahori's direction, too. If only smarter decisions had been made in that second half...
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    Okay I have never tried this. I'm going to give it a go. This is presuming that Connery is happy and committed to the role, no McClory BS, etc. I'm abiding by some rules, i.e. the age of the actor etc, but otherwise this is a fan exercise -- an ideal timeline/canon for the films.

    With a few huge exceptions if I retain a film with the actor who initially played the role (i.e. FRWL, TB, etc) I'm not going to go WAY geeky and demand that this or that be changed. Would take too long. So generally, aside from some minor changes, those films will remain as-is. I'm also not going to add in too many "new" titles using unfilmed books, although kudos to all of you for using your imagination with those.

    SEAN CONNERY

    Casino Royale (1962) -- dir. Terence Young
    Ever since I saw that opening casino sequence in DN with Connery I have longed to turn back time and see a proper adaptation. This would hew pretty close to Fleming. Maybe inject a bit more action if the minor budget allows. This has plenty enough tension and suspense to be an incredibly suave-yet-gruff espionage thriller.

    From Russia With Love (1963) -- dir. Terence Young
    Pretty much as-is.

    Dr. No (1964) -- dir. Terence Young
    Utilize the fact that in '64 they'd have a much larger budget. Maybe hew a bit closer to the novel, but otherwise I'd just like to see a more blockbuster style version of the film they made on the shoestring budget in '62.

    Moonraker (1965) -- dir. Peter Hunt / Terence Young (co)
    Stick to the book. This is maybe my favorite Fleming book so I'd love to see it adapted. Otherwise, sure, inject it with some cinematic bombast but retain the gist.

    Thunderball (1967) -- dir. Terence Young / Peter Hunt (co)
    BLOFELD TRILOGY. Pretty much as-is, with some improved editing. Connery's a bit older in this time line, but he remains in-shape because he's committed to the role and Saltzmann isn't making him mad or whatever. I read @Birdleson comments and I 100% agree and would do it the same way. Savalas as Blofeld (although he'd likely still be hidden here mostly). WIth a committed Connery (which I'm allowed to have since this is a fantasy) this would be both the perfect send-off for the best Bond actor and undoubtedly the high point of the series. WIth 4 films under his belt audiences would already have embraced that "Sean Connery IS James Bond" as the posters proclaimed etc.

    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) -- dir. Peter Hunt
    As-is. Obviously Connery replaces Lazenby as a mature-looking 007. End titles play "We Have all the Time in the World" instead of blasting the theme.

    You Only Live Twice (1970) -- dir. Peter Hunt
    Adhere to the book. An incredible send-off for Sean. Keep the Garden of Death stuff as psychedelic as the book depicts it. Don't be afraid to get a little weird.


    ROGER MOORE

    Live and Let Die (1972) -- dir. Guy Hamilton
    I still think this is a pretty great introduction for Moore as Bond, so we'll keep most of this. Bit more from the book. Doesn't Felix get mauled in this one (in the novel?). If so, I'd like to see the film depict that, and then for continuity's sake Felix wears a prosthetic from now on. I'd love that. My heart says keep J.W. because I hope that audiences realize we're supposed to be laughing at him and his racism and such rather than with him.

    Diamonds are Forever (1973) -- dir. Guy Hamilton
    So... we have to change some things obviously because Blofeld isn't in the novel, but otherwise I'd like to keep the dark humor and keep this pretty close to how it is. So obviously we change up the villains and such, but I want to keep Wint and Kidd and the tone generally. I think Moore would absolutely kill it.

    The Spy Who Loved Me (1975) -- dir. Lewis Gilbert
    This would be as-is. Iconic stuff. Maybe change the title in case "fake" Eon wants to use the actual novel at some point? Maybe for Broz or Dalton or Craig?

    Goldfinger -- dir. Lewis Gilbert
    So, this is a weird one, because I adore the GF we have, and I love what Hamilton did with it (and thus changed the series forever). So this is in no way me saying I wish the original GF were different, I'm just trying to be realistic about Connery not being able to do THAT many films, and I want to see so many other films with Connery so this is the one that had to move to Moore. Plus, I think Moore would kill it. Let Gilbert give it some more bombast than Hamilton maybe would've, but keep the lightness of touch and sleekness. Let Moore play in "god mode" Bond that he does in the Gilbert directed films. It would fit perfectly.

    "Moonraker" (1979) -- dir. Lewis Gilbert
    So, I need a new title because I used MR already. But I'm bad at titles. And I want the movie pretty much as-is so we get a lot of Gilbert's influence on the series because I love him. Maybe change space to something else? BUt I still want Barry's "journey into space" song.

    Octopussy (1981) -- dir. John Glen
    As-is. Trim some of the more outlandish stuff (you know the stuff if you're on this forum). But otherwise, I love this film's tonal mish-mash. I think it's a great send-off for Moore's Bond. My only main change: give Octopussy as a character more screentime, let their relationship develop a bit more. Let this be a romantic send-off for Moore. She is the only Bond girl in his tenure that I felt he ever truly had great chemistry with.


    TIMOTHY DALTON

    For Your Eyes Only (1983) -- dir. John Glen
    Pretty much as-is. The screenplay would be adjusted slightly to fit Dalton's portrayal a bit more, but otherwise since this is often considered Moore's "serious" Bond film, I think it suits Dalton phenomenally well.

    From A View to a Kill (1985) -- dir. John Glen
    Changing this a lot. Expand on the original story. But I simply cannot live in a world where we don't get May Day and Zorin, so honestly just find a way to shoe-horn them in. I don't care. It's my timeline, lol. Even though I love the film we got for its own weird, old, creaky reasons, I'm fine with changing a lot of this. Just give me Walken and Jones.

    The Living Daylights (1987) -- dir. Martin Campbell
    I have no idea if Campbell was directing films yet, but I maintain that Glen had way too many, and I would've liked to see Campbell do more. We're retaining the majority of this film, but since we're letting Campbell direct we will obviously have a slightly different tone and other changes in directorial tendencies. The action will remain top-notch. Since hindsight is 20-20 let's not have Bond team up with what would come to be known as the Taliban.

    The Hildebrand Rarity (1989) -- dir. Martin Campbell
    I said I wasn't going to use too many "unused" titles but then I realized that because I'm keeping these films on a fairly consistent release schedule, there's going to be so so so many more than there are in reality. Expand on the story.

    Licence to Kill (1991) -- dir. John Glen
    John Glen's swan song as a director, he comes back refreshed after taking a much-needed break. The film has superior production value, and it leans away from its American obsessions since two years have passed since the "real" release date and the producers are no longer trying to replicate American action cinema as much. Less gore. Keep the general tone. Allow the romance to develop more between Bond and Pam (yes, I like sending off the 007s on a positive note). Keep "bless your heart," for god's sake.


    PIERCE BROSNAN

    GoldenEye (1995) -- dir. Martin Campbell
    I'm giving them 4 years instead of 6. Same movie pretty much.

    Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) -- dir. John Woo
    Lol, why not. If it's going to have all the ridiculous gonzo action sequences, let Woo take a stab at it rather than Spottiswoode. Keep the cinematographer, though, for the love of god because TND is gorgeous. Bring on the doves. Keep much of the film the same. I think this one has aged fairly well, aside from some of the action. By bringing in Woo I'm just letting this be the wild card in terms of action sequences. We have a different group writing dialogue for these Brosnan films. Idk who. Just, someone to clean up the juvenile stuff.

    Colonel Sun (1999) -- dir. Michael Apted
    Give Apted another shot with a better script. I'm stealing this idea from @Birdleson shamelessly because I think it's excellent. No more TWINE. This will hew pretty close to the book. Judi Dench is M, btw.

    Die Another Day (2001) -- dir. Lee Tamahori
    Yeah, I'm letting Tamahori give it another shot. Again, we have different screenwriters. There's a surprisingly considerable amount of this I'd keep. I like the cast by and large, except let's not change the villain's race so whichever actor they decide to go with, keep that. Halle Berry can stay because there's a much better script remember. I think the "bones" of this plot are quite good things just get ridiculous later on.

    Icebreaker (2003) -- dir. Quentin Tarantino
    Why not. This means he doesn't do Kill Bill, but who cares. Do whatever you want. Change the title, I don't care. Let's see how it goes.

    ----

    I'm tired and ran out of time. I'll throw in Craig's tenure later. What do y'all think?

    Fantastic! I like how you gave in Casino Royale as the first Bond film from 1962. ;) Well done!
  • Posts: 1,593
    @Birdleson Yeah, the GF one is definitely my weirdest. I tried to use logic for it without giving Connery something like 8 Bond films, but it definitely doesn't feel right to me either. Did I forget about TMWTGG? I remember part of me wanting to actually try giving it to Dalton.

    That said we are totally in agreement about Connery's tenure. What I wouldn't give to have that timeline, and maybe no Saltzmann/Connery feud to ensure that he stayed committed to the role?

    @Some_kind_of_hero -- I didn't know that about the script! They're welcome to write it, I just don't want the script we ended up with.
  • Posts: 566
    @kadeklodt : A rather fascinating timeline than yours. I'm not sure I would have liked to have lived in that reality necessarily, although I have no difficulty imagining Cary Grant in the movies you associated with him, with the possible exception of LALD. Who would have been the director of this era? Young, Hitchcock? Would the movies have been in color in your mind? Also, regarding the following installments, when you mention for example Dalton starring in QoS, would that be the same story as the actual 2008 movie or is it just something totally different?

    @ThighsOfXenia : As a Lazenby fan, I'm always disappointed to see him put aside, but your timeline is no less appealing. I really like a number of your choices, especially when it comes to the Dalton era: seeing him starring in FATAK, a much needed break for Glen and a new director. I'm a little more skeptical about adding The Hildebrand Rarity. Not that the story could not be expanded, this is what the early LTK drafts were heading towards and which seemed interesting, but rather that it would just risk being perhaps redundant with the following installment. I guess Krest's character in LTK would have to be renamed. Otherwise, I'm quite seduced by the prospect of a Goldfinger starring Moore, although I think it should take place a little earlier in the timeline, maybe as his first or second movie.
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    @kadeklodt : A rather fascinating timeline than yours. I'm not sure I would have liked to have lived in that reality necessarily, although I have no difficulty imagining Cary Grant in the movies you associated with him, with the possible exception of LALD. Who would have been the director of this era? Young, Hitchcock? Would the movies have been in color in your mind? Also, regarding the following installments, when you mention for example Dalton starring in QoS, would that be the same story as the actual 2008 movie or is it just something totally different?

    @ThighsOfXenia : As a Lazenby fan, I'm always disappointed to see him put aside, but your timeline is no less appealing. I really like a number of your choices, especially when it comes to the Dalton era: seeing him starring in FATAK, a much needed break for Glen and a new director. I'm a little more skeptical about adding The Hildebrand Rarity. Not that the story could not be expanded, this is what the early LTK drafts were heading towards and which seemed interesting, but rather that it would just risk being perhaps redundant with the following installment. I guess Krest's character in LTK would have to be renamed. Otherwise, I'm quite seduced by the prospect of a Goldfinger starring Moore, although I think it should take place a little earlier in the timeline, maybe as his first or second movie.

    Couldn't decide which director at the moment.
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    Time to start over!

    At least mine from earlier was rushed and too silly... I decided to come up with my own universe known as the "Klodtverse" which is a rather amusing name. Okay, we stop using Cary Grant in this timeline.

    Here's mine:

    All first 16 films (except DAF) are the same with same directors and crew, Lazenby remains as Bond for only two pictures such as OHMSS and DAF, where the 1971 film has the same director from the last and same recurring people from the last film as well.

    Then we get to Roger Moore with seven films, and Timothy Dalton... we change this alternatively...

    SEAN CONNERY:
    Dr. No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Live Twice (1967)

    GEORGE LAZENBY:
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    ROGER MOORE:
    Live and Let Die (1973)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1975)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    Moonraker (1979)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)
    A View to A Kill (1985)


    TIMOTHY DALTON (early):
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence to Kill (1989)

    Then we get into the most interesting part, I decided to put release dates and directors here in this, no conflictive studio issues, nothing, Dalton stops being Bond, months before Brosnan was announced.

    TIMOTHY DALTON (cont.):
    The Hildebrand Rarity (August 29, 1991) (dir. John McTiernan)
    The Property of A Lady (October 12, 1992) (dir. Mike Newell)
    Risico (July 16, 1993) (dir. Mike Newell)
    007 in New York (March 21, 1994, Tim's 48th birthday!) (dir. Mark L. Lester)

    Following Dalton's departure in April 1994, we finally get to see Brosnan the next year in 18 months after Dalton's last.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (earlier):
    GoldenEye (November 8, 1995) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (November 11, 1997) (dir. Roger Spottiswoode)
    The World is Not Enough (November 24, 1999) (dir. Michael Apted)

    It would be later announced that the following films after TWINE would be filmed concurrently, Brosnan had to take breaks during each film to go in and start filming other films that don't relate to 007, this would easily make the crew nervous and stressed.


    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont.):
    When The Bullet Flashes (November 20, 2000) (dir. Michael Apted) (concurrent)
    Agent Under Fire (December 11, 2001) (dir. Simon West)
    Die Another Day (November 27, 2002) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Night Fire (October 16, 2003) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Everything or Nothing (December 25, 2004) (dir. Lee Tamahori)

    Following a series of concurrent films and different takes of directors, the EON family would hire Daniel Craig on January 2005, in the rebooted James Bond franchise, this would make people nervous but the producers' family says it might be only competitors with the original and reboot series, this would make the people nervous to know who is a better actor of Bond, Pierce was forced to play Bond as long as he can until the time is right.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont. competition against Daniel Craig):
    Phoenix Rising (September 3, 2005) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    Field of Intelligence (October 2, 2006) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    007 in Los Angeles [Blockbuster] (November 7, 2007) (dir. Richard Donner)
    Chicago Espionage (December 14, 2009) (dir. Michael Apted)
    Miami Vendetta (October 14, 2011) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    The Year of the Dragon (quadrilogy, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter 2012) (dir. Edward Zwick)

    This is where it gets interesting.

    DANIEL CRAIG (competitor to Pierce Brosnan until 2012, cont. films succeeding this):
    The Secret Agent (December 15, 2005) (dir. Matthew Vaughn)
    Casino Royale (November 14, 2006) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Quantum of Solace (December 18, 2008) (dir. Marc Forester) (different and longer)
    No Good About Goodbye (September 20, 2009) (dir. Marc Forester) (concurrent)
    Blood Stone (November 8, 2010) (dir. Matthew Vaughn) (concurrent) (different storyline)
    Skyfall (November 9, 2012) (dir. Sam Mendes) (longer and more better)
    Spectre (November 6, 2015) (dir. Sam Mendes) (runtime is longer, foster brother scene dropped)
    No Time To Die (October 8, 2021) (dir. Cary Joji Fukanaga) (same runtime, unconfirmed)


    So that's all... pretty wacky way to use the competition at the end, had to do it in case if something goes wrong. Pierce if only he had a lot of money with him to do more, in reality when the producers dropped him away with a phone call "you did good". I thought the competition I did was a good idea instead, this was inspired by when Halloween, the horror franchise took it's departure from originality and wanted to reboot and do a soft reboot with the original actress back, as time has evolved.

    meh, what do you guys think...?
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    Birdleson wrote: »
    Time well spent I say! Nice job.

    Thank you!

    What about the competition?
  • DeathToSpies84DeathToSpies84 Haydock, England
    Posts: 197
    kadeklodt wrote: »
    Time to start over!

    At least mine from earlier was rushed and too silly... I decided to come up with my own universe known as the "Klodtverse" which is a rather amusing name. Okay, we stop using Cary Grant in this timeline.

    Here's mine:

    All first 16 films (except DAF) are the same with same directors and crew, Lazenby remains as Bond for only two pictures such as OHMSS and DAF, where the 1971 film has the same director from the last and same recurring people from the last film as well.

    Then we get to Roger Moore with seven films, and Timothy Dalton... we change this alternatively...

    SEAN CONNERY:
    Dr. No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Live Twice (1967)

    GEORGE LAZENBY:
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    ROGER MOORE:
    Live and Let Die (1973)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1975)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    Moonraker (1979)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)
    A View to A Kill (1985)


    TIMOTHY DALTON (early):
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence to Kill (1989)

    Then we get into the most interesting part, I decided to put release dates and directors here in this, no conflictive studio issues, nothing, Dalton stops being Bond, months before Brosnan was announced.

    TIMOTHY DALTON (cont.):
    The Hildebrand Rarity (August 29, 1991) (dir. John McTiernan)
    The Property of A Lady (October 12, 1992) (dir. Mike Newell)
    Risico (July 16, 1993) (dir. Mike Newell)
    007 in New York (March 21, 1994, Tim's 48th birthday!) (dir. Mark L. Lester)

    Following Dalton's departure in April 1994, we finally get to see Brosnan the next year in 18 months after Dalton's last.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (earlier):
    GoldenEye (November 8, 1995) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (November 11, 1997) (dir. Roger Spottiswoode)
    The World is Not Enough (November 24, 1999) (dir. Michael Apted)

    It would be later announced that the following films after TWINE would be filmed concurrently, Brosnan had to take breaks during each film to go in and start filming other films that don't relate to 007, this would easily make the crew nervous and stressed.


    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont.):
    When The Bullet Flashes (November 20, 2000) (dir. Michael Apted) (concurrent)
    Agent Under Fire (December 11, 2001) (dir. Simon West)
    Die Another Day (November 27, 2002) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Night Fire (October 16, 2003) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Everything or Nothing (December 25, 2004) (dir. Lee Tamahori)

    Following a series of concurrent films and different takes of directors, the EON family would hire Daniel Craig on January 2005, in the rebooted James Bond franchise, this would make people nervous but the producers' family says it might be only competitors with the original and reboot series, this would make the people nervous to know who is a better actor of Bond, Pierce was forced to play Bond as long as he can until the time is right.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont. competition against Daniel Craig):
    Phoenix Rising (September 3, 2005) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    Field of Intelligence (October 2, 2006) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    007 in Los Angeles [Blockbuster] (November 7, 2007) (dir. Richard Donner)
    Chicago Espionage (December 14, 2009) (dir. Michael Apted)
    Miami Vendetta (October 14, 2011) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    The Year of the Dragon (quadrilogy, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter 2012) (dir. Edward Zwick)

    This is where it gets interesting.

    DANIEL CRAIG (competitor to Pierce Brosnan until 2012, cont. films succeeding this):
    The Secret Agent (December 15, 2005) (dir. Matthew Vaughn)
    Casino Royale (November 14, 2006) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Quantum of Solace (December 18, 2008) (dir. Marc Forester) (different and longer)
    No Good About Goodbye (September 20, 2009) (dir. Marc Forester) (concurrent)
    Blood Stone (November 8, 2010) (dir. Matthew Vaughn) (concurrent) (different storyline)
    Skyfall (November 9, 2012) (dir. Sam Mendes) (longer and more better)
    Spectre (November 6, 2015) (dir. Sam Mendes) (runtime is longer, foster brother scene dropped)
    No Time To Die (October 8, 2021) (dir. Cary Joji Fukanaga) (same runtime, unconfirmed)


    So that's all... pretty wacky way to use the competition at the end, had to do it in case if something goes wrong. Pierce if only he had a lot of money with him to do more, in reality when the producers dropped him away with a phone call "you did good". I thought the competition I did was a good idea instead, this was inspired by when Halloween, the horror franchise took it's departure from originality and wanted to reboot and do a soft reboot with the original actress back, as time has evolved.

    meh, what do you guys think...?

    Love what you’ve done with Dalton’s tenure. Which version of POAL does he do? The Alfonse Ruggiero script with the Terminator henchwoman scene or the action comedy one with enough quips to make Sir Roger blush?
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    edited July 27 Posts: 101
    kadeklodt wrote: »
    Time to start over!

    At least mine from earlier was rushed and too silly... I decided to come up with my own universe known as the "Klodtverse" which is a rather amusing name. Okay, we stop using Cary Grant in this timeline.

    Here's mine:

    All first 16 films (except DAF) are the same with same directors and crew, Lazenby remains as Bond for only two pictures such as OHMSS and DAF, where the 1971 film has the same director from the last and same recurring people from the last film as well.

    Then we get to Roger Moore with seven films, and Timothy Dalton... we change this alternatively...

    SEAN CONNERY:
    Dr. No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Live Twice (1967)

    GEORGE LAZENBY:
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    ROGER MOORE:
    Live and Let Die (1973)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1975)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    Moonraker (1979)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)
    A View to A Kill (1985)


    TIMOTHY DALTON (early):
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence to Kill (1989)

    Then we get into the most interesting part, I decided to put release dates and directors here in this, no conflictive studio issues, nothing, Dalton stops being Bond, months before Brosnan was announced.

    TIMOTHY DALTON (cont.):
    The Hildebrand Rarity (August 29, 1991) (dir. John McTiernan)
    The Property of A Lady (October 12, 1992) (dir. Mike Newell)
    Risico (July 16, 1993) (dir. Mike Newell)
    007 in New York (March 21, 1994, Tim's 48th birthday!) (dir. Mark L. Lester)

    Following Dalton's departure in April 1994, we finally get to see Brosnan the next year in 18 months after Dalton's last.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (earlier):
    GoldenEye (November 8, 1995) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (November 11, 1997) (dir. Roger Spottiswoode)
    The World is Not Enough (November 24, 1999) (dir. Michael Apted)

    It would be later announced that the following films after TWINE would be filmed concurrently, Brosnan had to take breaks during each film to go in and start filming other films that don't relate to 007, this would easily make the crew nervous and stressed.


    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont.):
    When The Bullet Flashes (November 20, 2000) (dir. Michael Apted) (concurrent)
    Agent Under Fire (December 11, 2001) (dir. Simon West)
    Die Another Day (November 27, 2002) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Night Fire (October 16, 2003) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Everything or Nothing (December 25, 2004) (dir. Lee Tamahori)

    Following a series of concurrent films and different takes of directors, the EON family would hire Daniel Craig on January 2005, in the rebooted James Bond franchise, this would make people nervous but the producers' family says it might be only competitors with the original and reboot series, this would make the people nervous to know who is a better actor of Bond, Pierce was forced to play Bond as long as he can until the time is right.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont. competition against Daniel Craig):
    Phoenix Rising (September 3, 2005) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    Field of Intelligence (October 2, 2006) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    007 in Los Angeles [Blockbuster] (November 7, 2007) (dir. Richard Donner)
    Chicago Espionage (December 14, 2009) (dir. Michael Apted)
    Miami Vendetta (October 14, 2011) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    The Year of the Dragon (quadrilogy, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter 2012) (dir. Edward Zwick)

    This is where it gets interesting.

    DANIEL CRAIG (competitor to Pierce Brosnan until 2012, cont. films succeeding this):
    The Secret Agent (December 15, 2005) (dir. Matthew Vaughn)
    Casino Royale (November 14, 2006) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Quantum of Solace (December 18, 2008) (dir. Marc Forester) (different and longer)
    No Good About Goodbye (September 20, 2009) (dir. Marc Forester) (concurrent)
    Blood Stone (November 8, 2010) (dir. Matthew Vaughn) (concurrent) (different storyline)
    Skyfall (November 9, 2012) (dir. Sam Mendes) (longer and more better)
    Spectre (November 6, 2015) (dir. Sam Mendes) (runtime is longer, foster brother scene dropped)
    No Time To Die (October 8, 2021) (dir. Cary Joji Fukanaga) (same runtime, unconfirmed)


    So that's all... pretty wacky way to use the competition at the end, had to do it in case if something goes wrong. Pierce if only he had a lot of money with him to do more, in reality when the producers dropped him away with a phone call "you did good". I thought the competition I did was a good idea instead, this was inspired by when Halloween, the horror franchise took it's departure from originality and wanted to reboot and do a soft reboot with the original actress back, as time has evolved.

    meh, what do you guys think...?

    Love what you’ve done with Dalton’s tenure. Which version of POAL does he do? The Alfonse Ruggiero script with the Terminator henchwoman scene or the action comedy one with enough quips to make Sir Roger blush?

    Dude oh my gosh I never seen the script, I was thinking... well, to sum it up, it should be set in the Far East, to what other rumors could say. Can't have a Terminator henchwoman, only thing I would add in is Jaws.
  • DeathToSpies84DeathToSpies84 Haydock, England
    Posts: 197
    kadeklodt wrote: »
    kadeklodt wrote: »
    Time to start over!

    At least mine from earlier was rushed and too silly... I decided to come up with my own universe known as the "Klodtverse" which is a rather amusing name. Okay, we stop using Cary Grant in this timeline.

    Here's mine:

    All first 16 films (except DAF) are the same with same directors and crew, Lazenby remains as Bond for only two pictures such as OHMSS and DAF, where the 1971 film has the same director from the last and same recurring people from the last film as well.

    Then we get to Roger Moore with seven films, and Timothy Dalton... we change this alternatively...

    SEAN CONNERY:
    Dr. No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Live Twice (1967)

    GEORGE LAZENBY:
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    ROGER MOORE:
    Live and Let Die (1973)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1975)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    Moonraker (1979)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)
    A View to A Kill (1985)


    TIMOTHY DALTON (early):
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence to Kill (1989)

    Then we get into the most interesting part, I decided to put release dates and directors here in this, no conflictive studio issues, nothing, Dalton stops being Bond, months before Brosnan was announced.

    TIMOTHY DALTON (cont.):
    The Hildebrand Rarity (August 29, 1991) (dir. John McTiernan)
    The Property of A Lady (October 12, 1992) (dir. Mike Newell)
    Risico (July 16, 1993) (dir. Mike Newell)
    007 in New York (March 21, 1994, Tim's 48th birthday!) (dir. Mark L. Lester)

    Following Dalton's departure in April 1994, we finally get to see Brosnan the next year in 18 months after Dalton's last.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (earlier):
    GoldenEye (November 8, 1995) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (November 11, 1997) (dir. Roger Spottiswoode)
    The World is Not Enough (November 24, 1999) (dir. Michael Apted)

    It would be later announced that the following films after TWINE would be filmed concurrently, Brosnan had to take breaks during each film to go in and start filming other films that don't relate to 007, this would easily make the crew nervous and stressed.


    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont.):
    When The Bullet Flashes (November 20, 2000) (dir. Michael Apted) (concurrent)
    Agent Under Fire (December 11, 2001) (dir. Simon West)
    Die Another Day (November 27, 2002) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Night Fire (October 16, 2003) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Everything or Nothing (December 25, 2004) (dir. Lee Tamahori)

    Following a series of concurrent films and different takes of directors, the EON family would hire Daniel Craig on January 2005, in the rebooted James Bond franchise, this would make people nervous but the producers' family says it might be only competitors with the original and reboot series, this would make the people nervous to know who is a better actor of Bond, Pierce was forced to play Bond as long as he can until the time is right.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont. competition against Daniel Craig):
    Phoenix Rising (September 3, 2005) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    Field of Intelligence (October 2, 2006) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    007 in Los Angeles [Blockbuster] (November 7, 2007) (dir. Richard Donner)
    Chicago Espionage (December 14, 2009) (dir. Michael Apted)
    Miami Vendetta (October 14, 2011) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    The Year of the Dragon (quadrilogy, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter 2012) (dir. Edward Zwick)

    This is where it gets interesting.

    DANIEL CRAIG (competitor to Pierce Brosnan until 2012, cont. films succeeding this):
    The Secret Agent (December 15, 2005) (dir. Matthew Vaughn)
    Casino Royale (November 14, 2006) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Quantum of Solace (December 18, 2008) (dir. Marc Forester) (different and longer)
    No Good About Goodbye (September 20, 2009) (dir. Marc Forester) (concurrent)
    Blood Stone (November 8, 2010) (dir. Matthew Vaughn) (concurrent) (different storyline)
    Skyfall (November 9, 2012) (dir. Sam Mendes) (longer and more better)
    Spectre (November 6, 2015) (dir. Sam Mendes) (runtime is longer, foster brother scene dropped)
    No Time To Die (October 8, 2021) (dir. Cary Joji Fukanaga) (same runtime, unconfirmed)


    So that's all... pretty wacky way to use the competition at the end, had to do it in case if something goes wrong. Pierce if only he had a lot of money with him to do more, in reality when the producers dropped him away with a phone call "you did good". I thought the competition I did was a good idea instead, this was inspired by when Halloween, the horror franchise took it's departure from originality and wanted to reboot and do a soft reboot with the original actress back, as time has evolved.

    meh, what do you guys think...?

    Love what you’ve done with Dalton’s tenure. Which version of POAL does he do? The Alfonse Ruggiero script with the Terminator henchwoman scene or the action comedy one with enough quips to make Sir Roger blush?

    Dude oh my gosh I never seen the script, I was thinking... well, to sum it up, it should be set in the Far East, to what other rumors could say. Can't have a Terminator henchwoman, only thing I would add in is Jaws.

    The 1st draft had Bond briefly battling one of Sir Henry Lee Ching’s creations while he tries to save Connie Webb.
  • kadeklodtkadeklodt Ottumwa, IA.
    Posts: 101
    kadeklodt wrote: »
    kadeklodt wrote: »
    Time to start over!

    At least mine from earlier was rushed and too silly... I decided to come up with my own universe known as the "Klodtverse" which is a rather amusing name. Okay, we stop using Cary Grant in this timeline.

    Here's mine:

    All first 16 films (except DAF) are the same with same directors and crew, Lazenby remains as Bond for only two pictures such as OHMSS and DAF, where the 1971 film has the same director from the last and same recurring people from the last film as well.

    Then we get to Roger Moore with seven films, and Timothy Dalton... we change this alternatively...

    SEAN CONNERY:
    Dr. No (1962)
    From Russia With Love (1963)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1965)
    You Only Live Twice (1967)

    GEORGE LAZENBY:
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

    ROGER MOORE:
    Live and Let Die (1973)
    The Man With The Golden Gun (1975)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    Moonraker (1979)
    For Your Eyes Only (1981)
    Octopussy (1983)
    A View to A Kill (1985)


    TIMOTHY DALTON (early):
    The Living Daylights (1987)
    Licence to Kill (1989)

    Then we get into the most interesting part, I decided to put release dates and directors here in this, no conflictive studio issues, nothing, Dalton stops being Bond, months before Brosnan was announced.

    TIMOTHY DALTON (cont.):
    The Hildebrand Rarity (August 29, 1991) (dir. John McTiernan)
    The Property of A Lady (October 12, 1992) (dir. Mike Newell)
    Risico (July 16, 1993) (dir. Mike Newell)
    007 in New York (March 21, 1994, Tim's 48th birthday!) (dir. Mark L. Lester)

    Following Dalton's departure in April 1994, we finally get to see Brosnan the next year in 18 months after Dalton's last.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (earlier):
    GoldenEye (November 8, 1995) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Tomorrow Never Dies (November 11, 1997) (dir. Roger Spottiswoode)
    The World is Not Enough (November 24, 1999) (dir. Michael Apted)

    It would be later announced that the following films after TWINE would be filmed concurrently, Brosnan had to take breaks during each film to go in and start filming other films that don't relate to 007, this would easily make the crew nervous and stressed.


    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont.):
    When The Bullet Flashes (November 20, 2000) (dir. Michael Apted) (concurrent)
    Agent Under Fire (December 11, 2001) (dir. Simon West)
    Die Another Day (November 27, 2002) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Night Fire (October 16, 2003) (dir. Lee Tamahori)
    Everything or Nothing (December 25, 2004) (dir. Lee Tamahori)

    Following a series of concurrent films and different takes of directors, the EON family would hire Daniel Craig on January 2005, in the rebooted James Bond franchise, this would make people nervous but the producers' family says it might be only competitors with the original and reboot series, this would make the people nervous to know who is a better actor of Bond, Pierce was forced to play Bond as long as he can until the time is right.

    PIERCE BROSNAN (cont. competition against Daniel Craig):
    Phoenix Rising (September 3, 2005) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    Field of Intelligence (October 2, 2006) (dir. Ridley Scott)
    007 in Los Angeles [Blockbuster] (November 7, 2007) (dir. Richard Donner)
    Chicago Espionage (December 14, 2009) (dir. Michael Apted)
    Miami Vendetta (October 14, 2011) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    The Year of the Dragon (quadrilogy, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter 2012) (dir. Edward Zwick)

    This is where it gets interesting.

    DANIEL CRAIG (competitor to Pierce Brosnan until 2012, cont. films succeeding this):
    The Secret Agent (December 15, 2005) (dir. Matthew Vaughn)
    Casino Royale (November 14, 2006) (dir. Martin Campbell)
    Quantum of Solace (December 18, 2008) (dir. Marc Forester) (different and longer)
    No Good About Goodbye (September 20, 2009) (dir. Marc Forester) (concurrent)
    Blood Stone (November 8, 2010) (dir. Matthew Vaughn) (concurrent) (different storyline)
    Skyfall (November 9, 2012) (dir. Sam Mendes) (longer and more better)
    Spectre (November 6, 2015) (dir. Sam Mendes) (runtime is longer, foster brother scene dropped)
    No Time To Die (October 8, 2021) (dir. Cary Joji Fukanaga) (same runtime, unconfirmed)


    So that's all... pretty wacky way to use the competition at the end, had to do it in case if something goes wrong. Pierce if only he had a lot of money with him to do more, in reality when the producers dropped him away with a phone call "you did good". I thought the competition I did was a good idea instead, this was inspired by when Halloween, the horror franchise took it's departure from originality and wanted to reboot and do a soft reboot with the original actress back, as time has evolved.

    meh, what do you guys think...?

    Love what you’ve done with Dalton’s tenure. Which version of POAL does he do? The Alfonse Ruggiero script with the Terminator henchwoman scene or the action comedy one with enough quips to make Sir Roger blush?

    Dude oh my gosh I never seen the script, I was thinking... well, to sum it up, it should be set in the Far East, to what other rumors could say. Can't have a Terminator henchwoman, only thing I would add in is Jaws.

    The 1st draft had Bond briefly battling one of Sir Henry Lee Ching’s creations while he tries to save Connie Webb.

    Oh wow...
  • Posts: 2,244
    The first decision that must be made is which book to film. Fleming wants Casino Royale, but the forward-thinking Cubby knows that the world - and the censors - aren't ready for a true adaptation. They go with the second book, instead: Live and Let Die.

    Sean Connery (1962 - 1965; 3 years, 4 films; age 32 through 35)

    1: Live and Let Die (1962)

    The film is a straight adaptation of the novel, however minor liberties are taken with the beginning plot in order to allow a similar introduction to the character of Bond as can be seen in Dr. No. One major plot point is changed; Felix is not mauled by the shark. Instead, Bond rescues him from Kananga's barracuda. Also, Felix escapes the warehouse by subduing Kanaga's guard rather than being released due to a mutual love of jazz; it is the jazz connection that instead allows Felix to distract the guard. The guard is fed to the shark by Kananga rather than Felix, a punishment for allowing his escape.

    The film is in black and white, save for the blood in the gunbarrel and the stylish title sequence, similar to the one featured in the real Dr. No. This is a stylistic decision insisted upon by Ian Fleming. This trend continues for the Connery films. Also a mainstay for Connery's tenure is director Terence Young, who will direct all four of his films.

    Connery is brilliant. Fleming plays an extremely convincing M, albeit for a single scene. Fonda as Solitaire is beloved and Poitier's role as Kananga recieves incredible acclaim. Gregory Peck as Felix even recieves some recoginition. Live and Let Die is a smash success, ensuring at least another film. Connery, originally on a two-film deal, agrees to extend his contract to four.

    The follow-up to Live and Let Die is a true moment of tension for the producers; with the smash success of the first film, the realization comes that they will indeed need to make a series of Bond films. They know they need this film to be bigger and better in order to satisfy fans and get the necessary box office returns. Pre-production begins only weeks after the premiere of Live and Let Die. As they are following the novels, Moonraker is automatically chosen to be the second film.

    I'm actually of the mind now that they should essentially do this, LALD followed by an ACTUAL adaptation of Moonraker, for Bond #7. Modify LALD to be a little less, erm... racist?... and to work in a proper introduction for the new actor (perhaps in the form of an Octopussy-like PTS that isn't actually related to the film) and then follow it up with the Moonraker adaptation we all want but never got.
Sign In or Register to comment.