Rest In Peace, show your respects to those who have passed away.

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  • JamesCraigJamesCraig Ocean Club, Bahamas.
    Posts: 3,264
    RIP Martin Birch, he was 71. Legendary producer, who worked on albums for Fleetwood Mac, Whitesnake, Rainbow, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath,...

    https://ultimateclassicrock.com/martin-birch-dead/
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 645
    Trini Lopez has died. According to news reports he died from complications caused by COVID-19.
    https://variety.com/2020/music/news/trini-lopez-dead-dies-the-dirty-dozen-1234732017/

    For those of you too young to remember, Lopez’s rise coincided with the “folk” movement in the 1960s (think Peter, Paul and Mary). And even though he was born in Dallas, Texas, I like to think that he added a touch of “Mexican flavoring” to the music of that period. Later, he went into acting, and even appeared in the film “The Dirty Dozen.” He was 83 years old.

    Oddly, I remember “singing” this song when I was about 4 or 5 years old.


    If I had a hammer, I'd hammer in the morning
    I'd hammer in the evening, all over this land
    I'd hammer out danger, I'd hammer out a warning
    I'd hammer out love between my brothers and my sisters all over this land
    ….
    Well I got a hammer and I got a bell
    And I got a song to sing all over this land
    It's the hammer of justice, it's the bell of freedom
    It's a song about love between my brothers and my sisters all over this land
    (Lee Hays / Pete Seeger).

    Somehow the lyrics are really appropriate at this moment in our history.

    RIP.
  • edited August 13 Posts: 1,162
    40 yrs ago : Dorothy Stratten

    Kamala . ugandan giant (James Harris)
  • Posts: 1,162
    Chaplin Chang (prod manager Way of Dragon , assistant director Enter Dragon)
  • DaltonCraig007DaltonCraig007 They say, "Evil prevails when good men fail to act." What they ought to say is, "Evil prevails."
    edited August 15 Posts: 15,484
    Japanese legend Tetsuya Watari has passed away, aged 78.

    tokyo-drifter-2-nikkatsu-cr.jpg

    He was known for such classics as Tokyo Drifter and Outlaw: Gangster VIP

    https://variety.com/2020/film/actors/tetsuya-watari-dead-dies-japanese-actor-1234736020/
  • edited August 15 Posts: 3,047
    Dwayne wrote: »
    Trini Lopez has died. According to news reports he died from complications caused by COVID-19.
    https://variety.com/2020/music/news/trini-lopez-dead-dies-the-dirty-dozen-1234732017/

    For those of you too young to remember, Lopez’s rise coincided with the “folk” movement in the 1960s (think Peter, Paul and Mary). And even though he was born in Dallas, Texas, I like to think that he added a touch of “Mexican flavoring” to the music of that period. Later, he went into acting, and even appeared in the film “The Dirty Dozen.” He was 83 years old.

    Oddly, I remember “singing” this song when I was about 4 or 5 years old.


    If I had a hammer, I'd hammer in the morning
    I'd hammer in the evening, all over this land
    I'd hammer out danger, I'd hammer out a warning
    I'd hammer out love between my brothers and my sisters all over this land
    ….
    Well I got a hammer and I got a bell
    And I got a song to sing all over this land
    It's the hammer of justice, it's the bell of freedom
    It's a song about love between my brothers and my sisters all over this land
    (Lee Hays / Pete Seeger).

    Somehow the lyrics are really appropriate at this moment in our history.

    RIP.

    Thanks for letting us know, @Dwayne. "Folk movement"? In the folk community, we call it The Great Folk Music Scare -- for about a month and a half, folk music was a commercially viable genre. Not at all what the Folk folk are looking for! I remember Trini well from those days -- his version of "Lemon Tree" may be the definitive Trini performance for me... but here's his version of another song with a Pete Seeger connection (writing credits vary, both Jose Marti and Joseito Fernandez have reason to claim authorship): Guantanamera.
  • JamesCraigJamesCraig Ocean Club, Bahamas.
    Posts: 3,264
    Pete Way, long time bassist for UFO (and Michael Schenker), has died due to complications from a car crash he was involved in two months ago. He was 70.

  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    Posts: 645
    @BeatlesSansEarMuffs. Thanks for the posting “Guantanamera.” I haven’t heard that song in a long time. In addition to wading through the living room to “If I Had a Hammer” when I was very young, I seem to recall hearing these songs in ‘music appreciation’ classes at school later on.

    Question: Did folk die out, or did it merely become part of the ‘tool box’ of popular music by the mid 1960’s? For example, Dylan influenced The Beatles (especially John), and some have written that their song writing on “Rubber Soul” was a nod in the folk direction.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,821
    @Dwayne and also @BeatlesSansEarmuffs - I find that topic highly interesting, albeit not immediately connected to 007...but neither are a myriad of other threads on this board, as we all know. I'm nowhere near an authority on music, but I have a special fondness for folk music and would love to discuss it in more depth. I'm also close to 64 ("Will you still need me...") and feel I have something to say. But I don't think it should be intensified on the "Rest in Peace" thread. So what do we do?
  • edited August 16 Posts: 3,047
    Folk-Rock was a legit genre of the mid-60s onward -- listen to the Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel, and the Mama & the Papas for examples of these. The "singer-songwriter" mode of the early-mid '70s was very much folk influenced. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young were one of the top acts of the '70s, and very folk-oriented. Gordon Lightfoot was a folkie in good standing back in the day ("Early Morning Rain" and "For Loving Me" were covered by Peter Paul & Mary back before GL himself started getting radio play with "If You Could Read My Mind" and "Sundown.") As far as the Fab Four themselves are concerned, one of their many strengths was their refusal to be easily pigeon-holed. Even in their earliest recordings, they were covering Broadway musicals ("'Til There Was You") as well as Chuck Berry and Little Richard rockers. The Beatles could be Country-Western music ("I Don't Want to Spoil the Party") one moment and soul music from the likes of Smokey Robinson the next. Listen to the sound track from "Help!" and you'll be hearing snippets of the James Bond theme interspersed with Dylanesque folk songs like "You've Got to Hide Your Love Away" and little bits of George Harrison's early attempts at playing the sitar. Even today, Beatles songs are a standard presence in Folk-oriented song books like "Rise Up Singing" and "Rise Again." The "problem" (if you want to call it that) with folk music that caused it to "die out" become absorbed into other forms of music is largely a politco-economic one. The hard-core folkies didn't TRUST the record companies who only wanted to use music to make money. To some, the music was only a means to further the Message. Musicians whose main concern was the furtherance of their own careers -- and Bob Dylan was very much one of those -- moved on from strict folk the moment the addition of an electric guitar to the mix guaranteed stronger sales.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,821
    @BeatlesSansEarmuffs - I think our respective last post sort of overlapped. What do you think about my suggestion?
  • j_w_pepper wrote: »
    @Dwayne and also @BeatlesSansEarmuffs - I find that topic highly interesting, albeit not immediately connected to 007...but neither are a myriad of other threads on this board, as we all know. I'm nowhere near an authority on music, but I have a special fondness for folk music and would love to discuss it in more depth. I'm also close to 64 ("Will you still need me...") and feel I have something to say. But I don't think it should be intensified on the "Rest in Peace" thread. So what do we do?

    Sorry, you posted this while I was composing my own response. What Do We Do? I dunno. Start still another thread? Take over an existing musical thread? Mmmm....
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,821
    Perhaps the mods will have a suggestion? It probably doesn't make much sense to check the entire archive for something fitting...
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 7,061
    This one absorbs tributes and related conversation, alongside general discussion and of course suggested listens.

    https://www.mi6community.com/discussion/14644/the-general-music-thread/p49
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    edited August 16 Posts: 645
    I don’t have a lot more to add to the discussion, but I’m curious to hear more from @BeatlesSansEarmuffs and @j_w_pepper about the subject. Perhaps the general music thread - per@RichardTheBruce?

    Maybe you guys can answer my all-time question: What was “Puff The Magic Dragon” really about!! 😊
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,821
    This one absorbs tributes and related conversation, alongside general discussion and of course suggested listens.

    https://www.mi6community.com/discussion/14644/the-general-music-thread/p49

    @RichardTheBruce: I agree in theory, but that thread has turned out to be a general-music-dump thread (no offense intended). There is a lot of music but no discussion.

    I'm not sure I can answer @Dwayne 's predominant question either way, but we should get it out of the RIP thread. Although so many folk musicians are, in fact, dead by now.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 7,061
  • edited August 17 Posts: 3,047
    j_w_pepper wrote: »
    This one absorbs tributes and related conversation, alongside general discussion and of course suggested listens.

    https://www.mi6community.com/discussion/14644/the-general-music-thread/p49

    @RichardTheBruce: I agree in theory, but that thread has turned out to be a general-music-dump thread (no offense intended). There is a lot of music but no discussion.

    I'm not sure I can answer @Dwayne 's predominant question either way, but we should get it out of the RIP thread. Although so many folk musicians are, in fact, dead by now.

    Okay, "The General Music Thread" it is. @Dwayne, your answer(s) re: PP&M are over there. @j_w_pepper, I know the intent was light-hearted, but really: a little cold, dontcha think? Besides. musicians of all genres are dying all the time. Kurt Cobain, anybody?



    (I don't care what copyright laws made them call this song: this is Nirvana covering "In the Pines" by Leadbelly. Or maybe Bill Monroe. Hey, that's just the folk process at work. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Pines Besides, all 3 are dead now...)
  • NicNacNicNac Moderator
    Posts: 7,164
    Folk-Rock was a legit genre of the mid-60s onward -- listen to the Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel, and the Mama & the Papas for examples of these. The "singer-songwriter" mode of the early-mid '70s was very much folk influenced. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young were one of the top acts of the '70s, and very folk-oriented. Gordon Lightfoot was a folkie in good standing back in the day ("Early Morning Rain" and "For Loving Me" were covered by Peter Paul & Mary back before GL himself started getting radio play with "If You Could Read My Mind" and "Sundown.") As far as the Fab Four themselves are concerned, one of their many strengths was their refusal to be easily pigeon-holed. Even in their earliest recordings, they were covering Broadway musicals ("'Til There Was You") as well as Chuck Berry and Little Richard rockers. The Beatles could be Country-Western music ("I Don't Want to Spoil the Party") one moment and soul music from the likes of Smokey Robinson the next. Listen to the sound track from "Help!" and you'll be hearing snippets of the James Bond theme interspersed with Dylanesque folk songs like "You've Got to Hide Your Love Away" and little bits of George Harrison's early attempts at playing the sitar. Even today, Beatles songs are a standard presence in Folk-oriented song books like "Rise Up Singing" and "Rise Again." The "problem" (if you want to call it that) with folk music that caused it to "die out" become absorbed into other forms of music is largely a politco-economic one. The hard-core folkies didn't TRUST the record companies who only wanted to use music to make money. To some, the music was only a means to further the Message. Musicians whose main concern was the furtherance of their own careers -- and Bob Dylan was very much one of those -- moved on from strict folk the moment the addition of an electric guitar to the mix guaranteed stronger sales.

    Always loved me a bit of folk-rock. A worthwhile artist to listen to is Michael Nesmith. He was an established songerwriter before being cast in The Monkees TV show, and in the early 70s produced 3 or 4 excellent folk rock albums. Songs like Different Drum and Conversations are worth digging out. One publication called him the greatest singer/songwriter no one has heard of.
    Neil Young is a towering figure
    And The Doobie Brothers.
  • I'll post something from Nesmith's Television Parts over in the General Music Thread...
  • edited August 18 Posts: 10,704
    RIP Ben Cross. Loved him in Nightlife with Maryam d'abo. He also made a dashing Barnabas Collins in the short lived 1990 DARK SHADOWS revival.
    https://people.com/movies/star-trek-actor-ben-cross-dead/
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 18,113
    RIP Ben Cross. Good actor. First Knight, Star Trek, Exorcist The Beginning. Haven't seen him in much but when I see him, he leaves an impression.
  • Posts: 524
    Christ! Ben Cross? That's a shock. I've been aware of him ever since "Chariots of Fire", "The Far Pavilions" and "The Flame Trees of Thika". And those productions were back in the 1990s.

    Wow. R.I.P. Mr. Cross.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger _Redux
    Posts: 37,971
    Jack Sherman, former member of The Red Hot Chili Peppers, passed away last Tuesday, at the age of 64.
  • GadgetManGadgetMan Nigeria
    Posts: 2,223
    Yeah, I was shocked to hear that. I had to listen to Californication again.
  • Posts: 1,162
    Anders Nelsson was forced by Bruce Lee to play Guantanamera over and over and over again on guitarr , lmao
  • JWPepperJWPepper You sit on it, but you can't take it with you.
    edited August 25 Posts: 485
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger _Redux
    Posts: 37,971
    JWPepper wrote: »

    My condolences to Daniel.
  • Posts: 4,303
    Learned today that Belgain comic book writer André-Paul Duchâteau, creator, with Tibet, of Ric Hochet (an investigative reporter whose investigations were a big part of the magazine Tintin when I was reading it, oh so many years ago) has passed away, aged 95.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/andre-paul-duchateau-est-mort-le-scenariste-de-ric-hochet-avait-95-ans_fr_5f4788b9c5b697186e31aeef
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