Is the future 60fps?

edited November 2022 in General Movies & TV Posts: 714
I really enjoyed watching the old Bond films with frame interpolation (AI FPS increase) activated. It felt more real.




Some more modern examples:





Comments

  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited November 2022 Posts: 7,322
    I personally don't mind it, but I know a lot of people are really against it. I remember being really blown away by it when it came out, serendipitously a lot of the Sony stores were playing Casino Royale as the example film with the technology. Everything looks like behind the scenes footage lol.

    To me it's more like a novelty; I'd probably prefer to watch these films in 24.
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 6,928
    I'm not a fan at all. Some see it as more realistic; To me it looks like a live television production shot on video, hence the term "Soap Opera Effect"
  • edited November 2022 Posts: 714
    It does. I did get used to it after a while though. It feels more like watching a play than a film.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper By the powers *in*vested in me by this parish, I hereby do commandeer this message board
    Posts: 7,175
    I'm not against further xxx K digitalisation of the films, but I won't be part of it. I'm totally satisfied with the Full-HD versions, and no, I don't give a sh?t if someone does publish them. I won't upgrade my Blu-ray (and remaining DVD) collection for yet another format. I'm fine with 1920x1080x px. It appears perfect on my 14-ft (diagonal) projector screen. Never change a running system.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,585
    Absolutely not. Film loses that magical feel to it in higher frame rates as far as I'm concerned, and it has the side effect of making visual effects look incredibly hokey too.
  • edited November 2022 Posts: 714
    Are there any situations where it is advantageous like broadcasted stage performances?

    It certainly doesn't do well in daylight scenes, but what about dimly lit or black and white?

    Not every shot in Gemini gave off a terrible feeling, when does it work and when not.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited November 2022 Posts: 7,585
    Are there any situations where it is advantageous like broadcasted stage performances?

    There are situations where it is used to great effect. Broadcast of live events is one, for sure. I'd say documentaries are another example. There, you want the reality of the subject to be really stressed.

    When it comes to cinema, I don't necessarily want the most realistic feeling to it. A heightened reality is what I want; the feeling of being transported somewhere. The ever so slight motion blur is a small but vital part of that feeling for me. It's what makes movies special.
  • DarthDimiDarthDimi Behind you!Moderator
    Posts: 22,004
    I couldn't agree more with @CraigMooreOHMSS !
  • talos7talos7 New Orleans
    Posts: 6,928
    @CraigMooreOHMSS Absolutely.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited November 2022 Posts: 7,322


    It seems like it works by synthetically creating a frame in between each frame or something?

    Anyways, yeah, turn it off.

    EDIT: @j_w_pepper I agree with you about resolutions too. I've seen no need to upgrade past 1080p, really, unless the TV is like 80" or something and you're way too close to it. At a certain point, the human eye can't distinguish between these microscopic pixels anyways.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 7,585
    It's important to distinguish between footage that was shot at that frame rate and footage shot at 24fps that is then subjected to third party software, as well.

    At least with things like The Hobbit and Gemini Man, you're seeing the film as it was intended to be displayed - even if I find it a lesser experience regardless.
  • edited December 2022 Posts: 714
    It's important to distinguish between footage that was shot at that frame rate and footage shot at 24fps that is then subjected to third party software, as well.

    At least with things like The Hobbit and Gemini Man, you're seeing the film as it was intended to be displayed - even if I find it a lesser experience regardless.

    You are right, for some reason I prefer the interpolated (when there are no artefacts) over the as intended.

    I do feel some of the new more generic shows/films would benefit from it.

    I can imagine it enhancing SF, SP and NTTD too.
  • edited December 2022 Posts: 1,278
    I'm not a fan of 60fps personally nor do I think it adds anything. That said it's interesting to think about. I mean, the only reason why films use 24fps is because of a long process starting from the silent film era where filmmakers assumed it looked the most 'natural' to the eye while using the least film. It's nothing to do with which frame rate most naturally correlates with how the human eye sees things in real life but simply something that's stuck and that we've gotten used to.

    Like I said though, I've not seen anything that I feel benefits from it. At worst you get into a bit of an uncanny valley situation with it in the sense that it looks too 'real'.
  • edited December 2022 Posts: 714
    I reckon more and more people will get more used to higher frame rates as video games get more realistic graphics and animations.
  • edited December 2022 Posts: 1,278
    I reckon more and more people will get more used to higher frame rates as video games get more realistic graphics.

    I have no idea. I will say that I don't necessarily think such innovations in visual media are necessarily tied to what's most 'realistic' per say but what's most immersive. Even stuff like motion capture suffered from that uncanny valley effect I talked about when trying to too closely replicate the human face (just look at Polar Express from 2004).

    I guess it's just about how these things are used. I'm not really sure what 60fps can add to a film, even with something like documentaries which can be very cinematic.
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 1,860
    I've only got a crap 2008 telly, so this stuff's sci-fi to me! ;)
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 16,341
    Venutius wrote: »
    I've only got a crap 2008 telly, so this stuff's sci-fi to me! ;)

    I got mine in 2012 and I'm pleasantly surprised it's still going to be honest! :)
  • VenutiusVenutius Yorkshire
    Posts: 1,860
    Yeah, exactly! :))
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