NO TIME TO DIE (2021) - Critical Reaction and Box Office Performance (DEFINITE SPOILERS)

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  • Posts: 13,420
    matt_u wrote: »
    It looks like it’s gonna drop a 60%, just like QoS (but the Foster film had a pretty much stronger opening weekend). That is looking even worse. Bye bye $150 million final gross.

    Critical reception however is much better than QOS. Not that it will change anything at the BO.
  • manovermanover uk
    Posts: 169
    I think we going to need a degree of patience here..Will probably get to 150 million at US boxoffice...but will be a marathon.
  • Seve wrote: »
    He like so many others also misses the point by not considering that Craig Bond is Bond recontextualized for the 21st century. Like, sure, if you want to see how a Bond would behave in the 1950s, you’re never gonna get that in 2020s, unless they go period piece. Fleming Bond would have never deserted like in SKYFALL. But Craig Bond isn’t Fleming Bond. The context and attitudes of the times are much different.

    Lol, I rather doubt that many modern secret agents in the real World are behaving like Craig-Bond

    Not to suggest that Fleming Bond is entirely realistic, but I'm sure modern secret agents still believe in what they are doing in much the same way they did in the 1950s, and even get some satisfaction what they are doing, in some way that Craig-Bond seemed incapable of sustaining for a movie length of time.

    Recontextualising Bond for the 21st century doesn’t mean accurately depicting modern secret agents (if they did that the films would be crippingly boring, no Bond is really realistic), it means reflecting the public mood. People don’t trust the establishment the way they did, and Craig’s Bond reflects that nicely.
  • Posts: 1,263
    I do wonder whether Hollywood will have a reset in terms of direction after covid much like how day star wars paved the way for the escapism of the 80s

    Maybe people will want to feel thrilled and excited again in a positive way rather than moody and depressed the whole time. You never got that vibe watching Indiana Jones, or the goodies or octopussy
  • Posts: 1,263
    An an additional observation. It’s absolutely ludicrous that a James Bond film should cost 250-300 million dollars.

    I expect a real tightening of belts and making the money go further next time out
  • Posts: 3,314
    That would be my fault.
    I unironically love DAF.
    No harm in that @MakeshiftPython. DAF might not be the best Bond movie, but there's still a helluva lot of fun to be had from watching it.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython Alpha Quadrant
    Posts: 5,525
    bondsum wrote: »
    That would be my fault.
    I unironically love DAF.
    No harm in that @MakeshiftPython. DAF might not be the best Bond movie, but there's still a helluva lot of fun to be had from watching it.

    Cheers to that.
  • Posts: 2,600
    bondsum wrote: »
    That would be my fault.
    I unironically love DAF.
    No harm in that @MakeshiftPython. DAF might not be the best Bond movie, but there's still a helluva lot of fun to be had from watching it.

    Cheers to that.

    It's my guilty pleasure too. Probably one of the Bond films I have watched the most (along with GF).
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython Alpha Quadrant
    Posts: 5,525
    bondsum wrote: »
    That would be my fault.
    I unironically love DAF.
    No harm in that @MakeshiftPython. DAF might not be the best Bond movie, but there's still a helluva lot of fun to be had from watching it.

    Cheers to that.

    It's my guilty pleasure too. Probably one of the Bond films I have watched the most (along with GF).

    It’s one of the few I could play on the TV anytime no matter the mood.
  • RainyRainy Skyfall
    edited October 2021 Posts: 40
    Grossed 24.3mil this weekend in NA, cumulative is 99.5, should pass 100mil tomorrow.

    Internationally grossed 54 mil. Cumulative is 348.3 mil.

    GLOBAL TOTAL: $447.8 million.



  • edited October 2021 Posts: 569
    Seve wrote: »
    He like so many others also misses the point by not considering that Craig Bond is Bond recontextualized for the 21st century. Like, sure, if you want to see how a Bond would behave in the 1950s, you’re never gonna get that in 2020s, unless they go period piece. Fleming Bond would have never deserted like in SKYFALL. But Craig Bond isn’t Fleming Bond. The context and attitudes of the times are much different.

    Lol, I rather doubt that many modern secret agents in the real World are behaving like Craig-Bond

    Not to suggest that Fleming Bond is entirely realistic, but I'm sure modern secret agents still believe in what they are doing in much the same way they did in the 1950s, and even get some satisfaction what they are doing, in some way that Craig-Bond seemed incapable of sustaining for a movie length of time.

    Recontextualising Bond for the 21st century doesn’t mean accurately depicting modern secret agents (if they did that the films would be crippingly boring, no Bond is really realistic), it means reflecting the public mood. People don’t trust the establishment the way they did, and Craig’s Bond reflects that nicely.

    My view on it: Most moviegoers don't care that Bond is working as a government agent -- they just want to see a story well told.

    The hand-wringing about Bond as an establishment figure appears to be coming from the filmmakers (and, of course, social media influencers looking for a hot take), who apparently have such a repulsion to his job that they constantly have him quitting, then joining, then quitting again (or dying). That's not the formula for a long-running series. I think Broccoli and co. have realized that, and I suspect NTTD is the final EON production of a Bond film.

    I'm not sure how one would "recontextualize" Bond in such a way that he's no longer working for MI6. I mean, if he's an ex-agent, then it would just be a variation on The Equalizer. I think that the next producers in charge of the Bond series should focus more on telling a great story than agonizing about the protagonist's job. People will still show up -- hell, the UK audiences will see it five times whether or not it's crap.
  • Dwayne wrote: »
    A question for some of you.

    In the run-up to NTTD, did ITV (in the UK) broadcast any of the Bond films on Friday or Saturday evening? I seem to recall reading that they did. I’m curious about this form of “soft promotion” because here in the US, I don’t recall any of the cable networks doing the same. Again, unless it really flew under my radar, we had the usual TV ads, but little else.
    I'm in the US, and I recall that a number of American cable/satellite channels were playing old Bond films earlier this spring -- around the time NTTD was slated to be released (just prior to its final delay).

    It seems those channels didn't want to do that again in September/October.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    Posts: 4,093
    Rainy wrote: »
    Grossed 24.3mil this weekend in NA, cumulative is 99.5, should pass 100mil tomorrow.

    Internationally grossed 54 mil. Cumulative is 348.3 mil.

    GLOBAL TOTAL: $447.8 million.

    I wonder if Bond will be able to make another $200 million globally (without China and Australia).
  • edited October 2021 Posts: 3,314
    Looking at those estimated figures, Japan looks really disappointing at only $16.3M, especially for a population of 125.8 million that used to be really big on Bond.

    PS. Good post @Escalus5.
  • Posts: 194
    So maybe another 50 Mio NA, 100 Mio from China, Rest 150, totally Gross 750. Mio
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython Alpha Quadrant
    Posts: 5,525
    There used to be Bond marathons on TV in the US during Thanksgiving weekend. That was especially great when Bond was a November release like when CR came out just one week before Thanksgiving (I saw it on Friday November 24th, one day after Thanksgiving).

    By releasing it October, a month strongly associated with Halloween season in the US, I don’t think it was wise.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    Posts: 4,093
    Bernie99 wrote: »
    So maybe another 50 Mio NA, 100 Mio from China, Rest 150, totally Gross 750. Mio

    $100 million from China would be great but it's too optimistic imo. Fast 9 lost a 50% there, compared to Fast 8, and SP made only $80 millions in China.

    I'd say that the best case scenario for Bond would be hitting the $700 million mark. I don't think it's gonna outgross F9, unfortunately, since it will do less money in both US and China.
  • edited October 2021 Posts: 569
    matt_u wrote: »
    I'd say that the best case scenario for Bond would be hitting the $700 million mark.

    And it needs approximately $900 million just to break even.

    Yeesh.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    edited October 2021 Posts: 4,093
    Escalus5 wrote: »
    matt_u wrote: »
    I'd say that the best case scenario for Bond would be hitting the $700 million mark.

    And it needs approximately $900 million just to break even.

    Yeesh.

    It was a film produced for a market that doesn't exist anymore.

    Just for the record, NTTD in the US will likely make less money than DAD 19 years ago. What a failure, domestically.
  • RyanRyan Canada
    Posts: 616
    Escalus5 wrote: »
    matt_u wrote: »
    I'd say that the best case scenario for Bond would be hitting the $700 million mark.

    And it needs approximately $900 million just to break even.

    Yeesh.

    It's insane how the break even point is becoming so high, not just for Bond but other big budget films. I realize there are other factors at play here and the delays were costly, but I wonder if this means we'll see a stricter budget next time. I suppose, at the very least, the Amazon purchase came at a good time so the loss might not be as damaging as it might have been.
  • I won't be surprised if the budget is scaled back next time. All those hating on the movie and telling others NOT to see it can pat themselves on the backs.
  • It should cross 500m worldwide next weekend and possibly 600m the following weekend if China has a strong debut.
  • manovermanover uk
    Posts: 169
    Doing well at moment...time will tell with the US boxoffice...I still think 150 million is reachable there..
  • Well done to the Uk, Germany and the rest of Europe in supporting a great Bond film at the box office. Now over to you China and Australia.
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    Posts: 4,093
    Well done to the Uk, Germany and the rest of Europe in supporting a great Bond film at the box office. Now over to you China and Australia.

    China is unpredictable (it looks like Dune will bomb next week) but what can we expect from Australia? $15/20 million?
    manover wrote: »
    Doing well at moment...time will tell with the US boxoffice...I still think 150 million is reachable there..

    Still less than DAD… :(
  • Posts: 614
    I think budgets will be scaled back regardless. Film makers are now very aware that a massive budget is not just a gamble on the audience’s taste, it’s also a gamble now on public health and government pandemic safety rules.

    Personally I think that will be a good thing. Most of my all time favourite films are low or mid-budget things.
  • DwayneDwayne New York City
    edited October 2021 Posts: 1,337
    There used to be Bond marathons on TV in the US during Thanksgiving weekend. That was especially great when Bond was a November release like when CR came out just one week before Thanksgiving (I saw it on Friday November 24th, one day after Thanksgiving).

    By releasing it October, a month strongly associated with Halloween season in the US, I don’t think it was wise.

    That’s always been my impression as well @MakeshiftPython And – unless I missed it – that element of “pre-release” hype was not present for NTTD in the US market.

    It is hard to separate cause and effect when looking at the factors that may have played a role in NTTD’s US Box Office performance – I’m sure the accountants at EON/MGM, etc … will do an analytical deep dive later on – but my impression was that the “buzz” in the US for this film has always been somewhat muted. For example, I don’t remember NTTD trending on twitter (US), when the first trailers debuted last year.

    Again, this is just my impression (i.e., others could have a different perspective), as I'm trying to understand the factors behind the differences in US and European box office responses to NTTD. And NTTD could still have legs at the box office. The next few weeks will tell.

    That said, I really enjoyed NTTD – and plan to see it again next week.
  • MakeshiftPythonMakeshiftPython Alpha Quadrant
    Posts: 5,525
    I’ve said this many pages ago prior to release. Bond has never been a big deal in the US as it used to be during Spymania in the 1960s. The closest it ever came to that was SKYFALL. Otherwise, it’s done respectable box office but nothing compared to the international numbers. LICENCE TO KILL wasn’t a total flop thanks to the international market alone.
  • I’ve said this many pages ago prior to release. Bond has never been a big deal in the US as it used to be during Spymania in the 1960s. The closest it ever came to that was SKYFALL. Otherwise, it’s done respectable box office but nothing compared to the international numbers. LICENCE TO KILL wasn’t a total flop thanks to the international market alone.

    +1.

    Also, the 900m breakeven point is a load of crap.
  • Escalus5 wrote: »
    Seve wrote: »
    He like so many others also misses the point by not considering that Craig Bond is Bond recontextualized for the 21st century. Like, sure, if you want to see how a Bond would behave in the 1950s, you’re never gonna get that in 2020s, unless they go period piece. Fleming Bond would have never deserted like in SKYFALL. But Craig Bond isn’t Fleming Bond. The context and attitudes of the times are much different.

    Lol, I rather doubt that many modern secret agents in the real World are behaving like Craig-Bond

    Not to suggest that Fleming Bond is entirely realistic, but I'm sure modern secret agents still believe in what they are doing in much the same way they did in the 1950s, and even get some satisfaction what they are doing, in some way that Craig-Bond seemed incapable of sustaining for a movie length of time.

    Recontextualising Bond for the 21st century doesn’t mean accurately depicting modern secret agents (if they did that the films would be crippingly boring, no Bond is really realistic), it means reflecting the public mood. People don’t trust the establishment the way they did, and Craig’s Bond reflects that nicely.

    My view on it: Most moviegoers don't care that Bond is working as a government agent -- they just want to see a story well told.

    The hand-wringing about Bond as an establishment figure appears to be coming from the filmmakers (and, of course, social media influencers looking for a hot take), who apparently have such a repulsion to his job that they constantly have him quitting, then joining, then quitting again (or dying). That's not the formula for a long-running series. I think Broccoli and co. have realized that, and I suspect NTTD is the final EON production of a Bond film.

    I'm not sure how one would "recontextualize" Bond in such a way that he's no longer working for MI6. I mean, if he's an ex-agent, then it would just be a variation on The Equalizer. I think that the next producers in charge of the Bond series should focus more on telling a great story than agonizing about the protagonist's job. People will still show up -- hell, the UK audiences will see it five times whether or not it's crap.

    Most of us on here don’t care, but having a Bond who’s too subservient and establishment might alienate younger viewers, who they’re apparently struggling with in America.

    And they already have recontextualised him pretty well imo. Bond is the same character he always is. St George spirit, motivated by his duty. But his superiors aren’t always in the right, because that’s just a reflection of how people see them in the modern world. So, sometimes he goes against them and acts independently. As I said on another thread, I don’t want Bond going all LTK/QoS every film, but I’ve got no problem with him winding M up and defying some of his orders.

    Back in the 60s the Bond archetype was the standard, but is there a single other franchise like that now? Bourne and Hunt are always going rogue. Superheroes are the big current trend, and they often operate outside the law, with police and government figures frequently being portrayed as incompetent, unhelpful or as outright villains. Rebels are what’s cool now, and I think Bond should always be cool. Being the patriotic figure he is doesn’t have to mean he always follows his government’s orders. Sometimes the most patriotic and heroic thing to do is the opposite.
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