The making of OHMSS book

Anyone else slighty disappointed with book? I know on Amazon and elsewhere it mainly receives rave reviews but I can't help feeling slight shortchanged. Infamous disagreements/problems with Lazenby are barely mentioned. For example, I've read Lazenby talking about times such as when Rigg was drinking indoors while he and crew were waiting outside in the freezing cold, leading to him having a go at her. Never mentioned in this book. The only incident I can remember being mentioned is him going off with Barbara Streisland. Not good enough for a book claiming to contain everything that is known about the production.

The garlic incident is dismissed without explaining what happened. The author concludes that the rift between Lazenby and Rigg was exaggerated and backs this up by stating Lazenby went on holiday afterwards with Rigg and her boyfriend. Fair enough but that completely ignores Rigg's later interviews where she said George was hell to work with. I think perhaps the Authors fondness for Lazenby and Peter Hunt got in this way of telling the whole story. It can't be fears of libel because there are direct quotes that can be used.

An amazon reviewer noted surprise that there was no reason given for the production being behind schedule, and no rumination on why Peter Hunt never directed another Bond. Again I can't help feeling that the Author's obvious affection for the man made him reticent. There is a quote from Maibaum saying Hunt was a monster of a director but bizarrely nothing further is added.

The above paragraphs are probably the most glaring omissions in the book.

The author goes into detail on some things, but usually not on the stuff I would have thought would be of greatest interest to readers. It would have been nice to hear the thoughts of Telly Savalas on OHMSS for example. I'm sure he must have talked about it at some point. Whereas I don't think most people are interested in the myriad of OHMSS related toys, or biographies of people involved in some minor part of production. I suppose I would have liked more detail on the meat of the production and the inside stories at the expense of all the paraphernalia surrounding it. I liked the sections on Maibaum's monkey obsession and the different scripts because that is actually to do with the film.

Now I don't hate this book. I enjoyed reading most of it and looking at the pictures. I just feel that for a book claiming to be the definitive word on the subject too often where detail is really needed, only the surface is given. For that claim and the price it asks for that, it is disappointing. Your thoughts/disagreements are welcome

Comments

  • Posts: 1,882
    I guess it just depends on what you're looking for in a book. Both the OHMSS and TLD making of books are the results of what I dreamed about years ago as a Bond fan and I couldn't be happier with them and would like nothing more than such products for each film in the series.

    As far as the Rigg-Lazenby feud, consider how many sources of that were from tabloids of the time. Who knows what was sensationalized and what wasn't? I've read numerous interviews with Lazenby over the years and he's given differing accounts of his experiences, and don't expect anything from Rigg. So she said he was hell to work with later on. You think she'd address that now? The woman rarely gives interviews from what I've heard, much less speaking about her OHMSS or Avengers work, which is what fans want to know about.

    I can't speak for the author, but why cheapen a better story for People Magazine-like stories with no real basis? Stars hating each other sells more copies than they get along great. Maybe there just wasn't that much there and they blew that up. They did their jobs and that was it.

    Same with Savalas. He was Kojak to most people and OHMSS didn't even register with most people. He passed before the film gained the reputation it now has. Same with many of the others involved in the production, they are not with us any longer. Your mention of Maibaum's description of Hunt as a monster with nothing else added. You can't exactly ask Maibaum to expand on that considering he's been gone for 26 years.

    I'm not sure how much more "meat" was available you speak of. The toys and marketing aspects are something I am incredibly interested in and part of the bigger story. Remember that OHMSS was the redheaded stepchild of the series for years and that's part of the overall story as the first film without Connery, as a new era was dawning in the film industry and Bond was considered passé in some circles.

    Out of curiosity, is there another Bond making-of book you consider to be better and I'd be interested in hearing your reasons why.
  • Posts: 170
    BT3366 wrote: »
    I guess it just depends on what you're looking for in a book. Both the OHMSS and TLD making of books are the results of what I dreamed about years ago as a Bond fan and I couldn't be happier with them and would like nothing more than such products for each film in the series.

    As far as the Rigg-Lazenby feud, consider how many sources of that were from tabloids of the time. Who knows what was sensationalized and what wasn't? I've read numerous interviews with Lazenby over the years and he's given differing accounts of his experiences, and don't expect anything from Rigg. So she said he was hell to work with later on. You think she'd address that now? The woman rarely gives interviews from what I've heard, much less speaking about her OHMSS or Avengers work, which is what fans want to know about.

    I can't speak for the author, but why cheapen a better story for People Magazine-like stories with no real basis? Stars hating each other sells more copies than they get along great. Maybe there just wasn't that much there and they blew that up. They did their jobs and that was it.

    Same with Savalas. He was Kojak to most people and OHMSS didn't even register with most people. He passed before the film gained the reputation it now has. Same with many of the others involved in the production, they are not with us any longer. Your mention of Maibaum's description of Hunt as a monster with nothing else added. You can't exactly ask Maibaum to expand on that considering he's been gone for 26 years.

    I'm not sure how much more "meat" was available you speak of. The toys and marketing aspects are something I am incredibly interested in and part of the bigger story. Remember that OHMSS was the redheaded stepchild of the series for years and that's part of the overall story as the first film without Connery, as a new era was dawning in the film industry and Bond was considered passé in some circles.

    Out of curiosity, is there another Bond making-of book you consider to be better and I'd be interested in hearing your reasons why.

    Thanks for your reply. To your last point it's put me off by buying anymore tbh mate. I'm not saying the author should have been interviewed these people himself - just use the material that already exists. That Maibaum quote must have comes from somewhere, I highly doubt any kind of context was impossible to get.

    It's not about cheapening the story, it's about putting out the whole story. If you're making a definitive book imo it should not shy away from including possibly unseemly things. The idea that things were largely hunky dory does not accord with what we've heard from all sides over the years. Heck Laz says Hunt didn't speak to him most of the production.
  • Posts: 1,882
    I wouldn't let your relative disappointment in this book put you off exploring other such books. I doubt there will ever be anything that is absolutely, completely the end-all, be-all, but something that comes very, very close is so worth it. I do realize the steep expense of buying a book such as this can be tough, but unfortunately it's also something you won't find at the local library.

    Part of the fun of being a Bond fan is there are other stories still to be explored out there about the films you love most. The Helfenstein book on TLD follows the same format as The Making of OHMSS. The Battle for Bond is another one that comes as close as you can get to the full story.
  • Posts: 170
    BT3366 wrote: »
    I wouldn't let your relative disappointment in this book put you off exploring other such books. I doubt there will ever be anything that is absolutely, completely the end-all, be-all, but something that comes very, very close is so worth it. I do realize the steep expense of buying a book such as this can be tough, but unfortunately it's also something you won't find at the local library.

    Part of the fun of being a Bond fan is there are other stories still to be explored out there about the films you love most. The Helfenstein book on TLD follows the same format as The Making of OHMSS. The Battle for Bond is another one that comes as close as you can get to the full story.

    At the end of the day I'm not in the same category of fandom as a lot of the guys on here. Maybe they find stuff in these books which are of interest to them but wouldn't be to a more middling fan like me. I'm after the more sordid stuff haha.
  • Posts: 1,882
    Oh, I see where you're coming from. You may have a tougher time finding books on that as far as I know. Maybe somebody else can point you that way.
  • edited August 2017 Posts: 2,895
    The Making of OHMSS book was a must-buy for me because of the sections on the development of the script, which suggested how the film might have been if it'd been filmed with Connery in '65 and so on. Lots of fascinating detail (to me anyway) on what-might-have-been, including the initial plans the follow-up to OHMSS. That material is the really rare stuff--it requires in-depth, on-site research, and Helfenstein did his homework. As for what the OP complained about not getting--well, it wasn't possible to get. Rigg rarely gives interviews, Maibaum is dead and so is Savalas (and Hunt), and if Telly had spoken about OHMSS after the film, Helfenstein presumably would have reprinted any relevant information. Nevertheless, the book is a vital purchase for anyone interested in how the film was scripted and made.
  • Posts: 170
    BT3366 wrote: »
    Oh, I see where you're coming from. You may have a tougher time finding books on that as far as I know. Maybe somebody else can point you that way.

    I was joking with that last remark of mine mate.

    @Revelator yes I found that stuff interesting. By no means is the book a dud.
  • 0BradyM0Bondfanatic70BradyM0Bondfanatic7 Quantum Floral Arrangements: "We Have Petals Everywhere"
    Posts: 28,694
    @The_Donald, perhaps this book will be more to your liking:

    https://www.amazon.com/Some-Kind-Hero-Remarkable-Story-ebook/dp/B01491XBKG

    It was recommended to me on this thread here on the forum:

    https://www.mi6community.com/discussion/3341/sirhenryleechachings-for-original-fans-your-introduction-to-bond-share-your-personal-bond-story/p206

    It's been described as a very candid book made up of revealing insights from the people involved in the films in a chronological order from 1962 to now, with each film getting a section. It could give you that extra bit of stuff you're interested in, and though I've not dug into it in a massive way, it's promised to not hold back in detailing the various struggles of making the films and how the folks involved were like water and oil at times.

    One recommendation from a Bond fan in the thread said, "'Some Kind of Hero' is indispensable. For me it's the ultimate Bond reference guide, and I've seen others on this forum refer to it to answer questions. It's pretty much everything you would ever want to know about the Bond films packed into one great book."
  • Posts: 170
    @The_Donald, perhaps this book will be more to your liking:

    https://www.amazon.com/Some-Kind-Hero-Remarkable-Story-ebook/dp/B01491XBKG

    It was recommended to me on this thread here on the forum:

    https://www.mi6community.com/discussion/3341/sirhenryleechachings-for-original-fans-your-introduction-to-bond-share-your-personal-bond-story/p206

    It's been described as a very candid book made up of revealing insights from the people involved in the films in a chronological order from 1962 to now, with each film getting a section. It could give you that extra bit of stuff you're interested in, and though I've not dug into it in a massive way, it's promised to not hold back in detailing the various struggles of making the films and how the folks involved were like water and oil at times.

    One recommendation from a Bond fan in the thread said, "'Some Kind of Hero' is indispensable. For me it's the ultimate Bond reference guide, and I've seen others on this forum refer to it to answer questions. It's pretty much everything you would ever want to know about the Bond films packed into one great book."

    Thanks. When I work my way up in the world and start earning something Mr Taxman doesn't take away I will for sure rid my wallet from some cobwebs haha.
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