Which Bond novel are you currently reading?

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  • LeonardPineLeonardPine The Bar on the Beach
    Posts: 3,419
    Mathis1 wrote: »
    The Spy Who Loved Me Novelisation by Christopher Wood

    Picked this up recently on a secondhand book site. And wow! Wood emulates Fleming much better than any other Bond novelist, apart from Markham (Kingsley Amis)

    He blends the Fleming Bond with the cinematic one quite seamlessly.

    This is very different from the film (No Bond on a Camel in this) especially the first few chapters which are excellent.

    Jaws is treated as completely serious and threatening. He even gets a cool backstory, as does Stromberg.

    The latter parts are more close to the finished film (Bond and Anya have been winched down to the sub) which is where i'm up to in this so far suprisingly excellent read.

    I just bought TSWLM book myself few weeks ago. Havent got around to reading it yet. Looking forward to it!

    Hope you enjoy it as much as i have mate.

    Needless to say this would have been a much more hard edged Bond film if it was like this book!
  • Posts: 5,806
    Roadphill wrote: »
    Always felt like TMWTGG was fairly harshly viewed in comparison to a lot of the other Fleming novels, so I just gave it a re-read. In fairness it probably is one of the weaker entries. I love the Novel Scaramanga, though.

    As much as I enjoyed Christopher Lee in the film, I can't help but feel a really hard nosed and obnoxious American villain would have felt more unique. Roy Schieder would have been a fantastic Scaramanga, had they stuck more to the source.

    I love that casting decision @Roadphill !!
  • RoadphillRoadphill United Kingdom
    Posts: 973
    peter wrote: »
    Roadphill wrote: »
    Always felt like TMWTGG was fairly harshly viewed in comparison to a lot of the other Fleming novels, so I just gave it a re-read. In fairness it probably is one of the weaker entries. I love the Novel Scaramanga, though.

    As much as I enjoyed Christopher Lee in the film, I can't help but feel a really hard nosed and obnoxious American villain would have felt more unique. Roy Schieder would have been a fantastic Scaramanga, had they stuck more to the source.

    I love that casting decision @Roadphill !!

    Thanks @peter While I was reading Scaramanga's dialogue, I couldn't help but visualise him in my mind.
  • Posts: 5,806
    it's a terrific choice. I've just started reading the novels again (every couple of years I read them from fist to last), and when I get to this last one, I wonder if Roy will be my Scaramanga now?

    It's funny, while reading Casino Royale, at various points I see only Lazenby at the gambling table (when he takes out his cigarette case and lighter for example), at other times I see Connery; still at other times I see Craig (especially with Mathis and Vesper); I saw Dalton once, after Bond tips his chair over, and; sometimes I see a mish-mash of Connery/Craig...

    Suffice to say it's been a fun read.
  • RoadphillRoadphill United Kingdom
    Posts: 973
    peter wrote: »
    it's a terrific choice. I've just started reading the novels again (every couple of years I read them from fist to last), and when I get to this last one, I wonder if Roy will be my Scaramanga now?

    It's funny, while reading Casino Royale, at various points I see only Lazenby at the gambling table (when he takes out his cigarette case and lighter for example), at other times I see Connery; still at other times I see Craig (especially with Mathis and Vesper); I saw Dalton once, after Bond tips his chair over, and; sometimes I see a mish-mash of Connery/Craig...

    Suffice to say it's been a fun read.

    It's strange who the mind's eye conjures up. Roger and Sean are by far my favourite Bonds, but I never see them when I read Fleming. Only ever Lazenby or Brosnan... As you mention Casino Royale, for some reason I always see Robbie Coltrane as Le Chiffre...
  • Posts: 5,806
    @Roadphill ... not a bad image to have of Le Chiffre. I couldn’t picture him as that since I think he gives off a genuine aura of friendliness, but I can see why your mind’s eye painted the portrait (the physical nature of the two men are certainly comparable). I can’t describe who my Le Chiffre resembles, but for some odd reason, I hear Michael Lonsdale’s voice every time Le Chiffre speaks!!
  • Posts: 2,300
    Roadphill wrote: »
    Roy Schieder would have been a fantastic Scaramanga, had they stuck more to the source.

    Mankiewicz wanted Jack Palance for the role, and I think he would have been terrific--and maybe even a bit scary.

  • DoctorNoDoctorNo USA-Maryland
    Posts: 729
    Jack Palance is perfect... he would have brought suitable weird scary to it
  • RoadphillRoadphill United Kingdom
    Posts: 973
    Revelator wrote: »
    Roadphill wrote: »
    Roy Schieder would have been a fantastic Scaramanga, had they stuck more to the source.

    Mankiewicz wanted Jack Palance for the role, and I think he would have been terrific--and maybe even a bit scary.

    I did remember reading that somewhere. I think EON actually approached him, but alas he wasn't interested..
  • MooseWithFleasMooseWithFleas Philadelphia
    Posts: 3,179
    Reading Colonel Sun. The opening chapters are fantastic, really has that Fleming feel. I have to admit the middle chapters though have been a bit dull to get through. Entering the last act of the book and hope it picks back up to a nice conclusion.

    Personally, I only enjoyed the beginning.

    I just finished Colonel Sun a couple weeks ago. I have to agree with you. The first third of the book was really solid, with the first 3-4 chapters being great. The book slowed to a crawl for me in the middle all the way until the last few chapters. It redeemed itself a bit towards the end, but was still only mildly enjoyable compared to most Fleming endings. Shame because I thought Amis really caught Fleming's style in the early part of the books.
    C+ for me overall. Enjoyable and glad I read it (first timer), but with such a banger of a premise, I thought the execution could have been much better.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 2,061
    James Bond Origin Vol 2. It’s a shame that we aren’t getting a Vol 3. It ended on a cliffhanger.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 9,129
    Sometimes unpublished content like that become available over time, @MaxCasino. It would be great to see that.

  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 2,061
    Diamonds are Forever. Boy the movie should have stuck more to the original story!
  • Agent_99Agent_99 enjoys a spirited ride as much as the next girl
    Posts: 2,594
    Amazon had a bunch of Gardner Bonds for 99p each a while ago. I've embarked on For Special Services. (I know I read some Gardners in the 90s but I can no longer remember which!)
  • CommanderRossCommanderRoss The bottom of a pitch lake in Eastern Trinidad, place called La Brea
    Posts: 6,954
    Live and let die. Bond just meets 'the big man'.
  • BirdlesonBirdleson San Jose, CAModerator
    Posts: 31,006
    I love Fleming’s description of the villain.
  • MaxCasinoMaxCasino United States
    Posts: 2,061
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Diamonds are Forever. Boy the movie should have stuck more to the original story!

    Just finished DAF. Slightly a step down from the first 3 books, namely in the main villains department. However, it definitely has the strongest written Bond Woman at this point. EON should definitely use the handcar on the train tracks at some point in the future!
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 4,464
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    MaxCasino wrote: »
    Diamonds are Forever. Boy the movie should have stuck more to the original story!

    Just finished DAF. Slightly a step down from the first 3 books, namely in the main villains department. However, it definitely has the strongest written Bond Woman at this point. EON should definitely use the handcar on the train tracks at some point in the future!

    AVTAK?
  • Posts: 1,904
    I just finished man with golden gun a few months ago. You can really tell Ian Flemming didn't finish the novel
  • Posts: 5,806
    fjdinardo wrote: »
    I just finished man with golden gun a few months ago. You can really tell Ian Flemming didn't finish the novel

    For all it's fault, I really love TMWTGG. Maybe because of its faults? I love how Bond tries to kill M at the beginning, and then the more stripped down story-telling that leads to the one on one battle between Bond and Scaramanga.

    I really do love it!
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 606
    Reading the novels for the first time.
    I had gotten back into Bond through a combination of hype for NTTD and somehow finding the Dynamite Bond comics. After I've read those, including Casino Royale and LALD, I thought I should go for the novels. With CR being the first, I thought I should start there, but after finishing that I felt the comic adaptation was quite close, so I jumped the LALD novel and went straight to MR. Loved that, so DAF and FRWL soon followed. Starting DN with the Strangways murder and then Quarrel entering the scene I felt I missed a connection to the characters, somehow.
    So now I'm back to LALD the novel (currently in Big's office and Solitaire has just entered the picture) and technically 4 or 5 chapters into DN, although I will start that fresh once I'm done with the earlier book.
  • Posts: 5,641
    I've read the novels first when I was about 8 or 9. About the same time I read the entire Jules Verne collection, some Graham Green's books and Aldous Huxley's Brave new World. They all made quite an impression. I've since returned many times to all of those. I've got this ritual, I like to start the Summer with Lawerence of Arabia (the film), and with Dr. No (the novel) :) Ian Fleming's novels are always comfort reading, light and fast. And a blast for us who have to do some more heavy literature reading during the year. I'd advise reading them all in order, it's quite an experience of continuity, unlike the films.
  • MooseWithFleasMooseWithFleas Philadelphia
    Posts: 3,179
    Moonraker novelization. Very similar to the film but reads much more seriously then what transpires on screen by cutting out some of the most silly parts. Which don't get me wrong MR is my favorite film and I love the silliness in addition to the more serious moments. Just found it interesting how straight it plays in the book.
  • BirdlesonBirdleson San Jose, CAModerator
    Posts: 31,006
    I love those adaptations.
  • Posts: 5,806
    Reading them in order in between other books. So late summer I read, The Spy And The Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of The Cold War, then I read Casino Royale; after CR I read Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, and now I'm reading Live and Let Die (a novel which was never my favourite, but this time round it's entertaining and I find it more intriguing than I have in the past).

    I love that brief glimpse that Bond gets of Mr. Big in the back of the car (being driven about my a woman decked out in full chauffeur uniform); I keep picturing Big as Bill Duke (but with paler skin and a larger head)...
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    Posts: 11,951
    Per Fine Ounce
    I have included this into my Bondathon, even though it is more of an oddity than a legitimate part of the cannon. My 2nd attempt, and I don't believe I got this far the last time. I have never read a book before with so many mistakes. One or two... ok, but this is starting to take the proverbial.
  • BirdlesonBirdleson San Jose, CAModerator
    Posts: 31,006
    That was my experience. Amateur writing and editing.
  • MajorDSmytheMajorDSmythe Still waiting for the Jena Malone Batwoman movie that's never going to be made.Moderator
    Posts: 11,951
    Per Fine Ounce
    Finished today. I have never read a book that was so riddled with grammar errors and contradictions. The thing is, I actually enjoyed the story, and the character of Peace. I also liked the villain of the book having some unusual pets. If this became a series, I would follow it. But the ammount of mistakes.... it boggles the mind. Someone should lose their job. It is such a popr quality that if it were a plane, the pilot would nose dive into the ground, right after takeoff.
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 606
    Done with LALD and now back to DN.
    I would assume a lot of ink (or pixels or whatever) has been spilled about LALD from the perspective of the modern reader. All I am going to add to this is that I find the way Fleming writes what I assume to be Jive or something (?) and other ethnic dialects (specifically Quarrel's) to be really hard to read. Not because I have some moral problem with it, just straight up understanding what people are saying is hard sometimes. Well I also wince a bit at the extreme othering of black and other minority characters, but I just accept that as Fleming in the 50s just portraying the massive gulf between the life he led (and ergo Bond leads) and what he perceived the lives of others to be.

    Other than that I mostly enjoyed the book, but would say that my original thought was correct that the comic adaption is faithful enough to the novel (at least in the text, that specific book has some weird picture/text differences, but here is not really the place to discuss that).

    So now I'm back with Dr. No with the slightly strange added effect, that in my botched reading order, was basically just in Jamaica in LALD and all the "ah yes that treasure business five years ago" comments are slightly funny. I again have the small problem with understanding Quarrel sometimes, but other than that I like the set-up so far.
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