Where does Bond go after Craig? *Potential SPOILERS*

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  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,381
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 14,731
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,381
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.

    I probably wouldn't, because it's fairly terrible! :D
  • Posts: 4,414
    Its an interesting topic re the fact that, perhaps without thinking about it, Fleming created his own "Avengers" by having a 007 (thereby implying that there are at least 6 other agents). I fully realise that this forum is packed with those who want to respect tradition, Bond's legacy etc etc. But, as with any argument, tradition alone is a rather weak foundation. There is an MI6 universe. M, Q, Moneypenny etc do not work exclusively with Bond. The majority of their time is spent with other agents assisting with other exciting missions. Spin off adventures enable EON to move with the times in terms of characteres, themes, tone, age, gender etc whilst still having Bond working on his own to please core "traditional" fans. EON have huge potential here IMHO but my gut says that they simply dont have a sense of risk and/or ambition to explore the universe.

    PS its fascinating all the "fuss" we have had re race, gender and Bond whilst, via Skyfall (9 years ago) , we have seen a black, comparatively young (35) woman working shoulder to shoulder with Bond in the field and this hardly raised an eyebrow. If fans can try to put tradition to one side and just look at what could work re good story telling and established/ liked characters (and actors), a Naomi Harris spin off is just sitting there (or was) waiting to be made.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,381
    I think Harris could have done it.

    Films with other 00 agents I don’t really see the point of though: even if they were different to Bond they’d still be doing the same things as him, you’d likely end up with not-quite Bond movies; and then you’ve got Eon making rivals to their own series, which would be mad.
    With Harris as Moneypenny I can imagine something a bit less action-based, probably more thriller-y, maybe even more drama-based.
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    edited May 10 Posts: 4,623
    I mean at the end of the day, anything's possible, but personally, I struggle to see how the risks could outweigh the wins. To create a spin-off for a franchise that's nearly 60 years old and isn't really a "universe" when most franchises with the ability to create spin-offs are based on source material with extensive universes and many narrative possibilities that are specific to that franchise and each one with enough of its own identity to offer something different each time...

    ...but what would differentiate a spin-off in the world of a modern, realistic spy even if slightly extravagant from just another spy film when the source material the entire franchise is based on is focused on one character?

    Even with characters like M, Q, and Moneypenny - I just can't see how it could work.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    edited May 10 Posts: 14,731
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.

    I probably wouldn't, because it's fairly terrible! :D

    It's been a long time since I last read it but I remember it being a decent enough plot and Bond novel in general. It could still be used as a starting point for a new Bond film plot.
  • Posts: 4,414
    I know its hard to state within the forum but not all movie goers relate directly to Bond's character. As we have seen within other universes, it is possible to have other central characters/heroes who are very different in their own characteristics and, therefore, attract a different fan base and also have different tones. Just the idea of mentioning fanbase, cultural change, demgraphics etc will make some Bond fans "turn off" but one way to ensure that Bond himself can stay the same but MI6 to remain contemporary is to go down the universe route. A georgeous black female double O agent? why not? (other than "it's not Bond")

    Re the risks: to turn that on its head, the risks by not embracing a wider universe with different range of characters is that the franchise refuses to update and stuggles to keep up with it's competitors. Risk can work in both directions.

    Of course, the execution is another issue. Dont get me wrong, it could be a stinker. But so could any movie. But the concept is sound IMHO

    PS re the lack of original material, TBH, I think thats just push back based on tradition. How many movie fans know or care about the original Avengers written material? around the same as that who care about the original Bond books?
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    edited May 10 Posts: 8,381
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.

    I probably wouldn't, because it's fairly terrible! :D

    It's been a long time since I last read it but I remember it being a decent enough plot and Bond novel in general. It could still be used as a starting point for a new Bond film plot.

    I tried reading it again about two years ago and I had to give up, it’s absolutely dreadful stuff- there’s a car chase where it really literally is just Bond pushing buttons. The baddies are a secret society who worship Pythagoras and triangles: there’s really nothing worth keeping there.
  • Posts: 497
    Although I'm not sure whether a Facts of Death adaptation would be particularly interesting, as I've never been sensitive to this plot around Pythagoras, I really like the starting point of the novel with Bond and the current M being invited to Sir Miles Messervy's dinner party. As I said before, I find that the Craig era was really self-contained and never had the desire to build a world around its iteration of Bond; a good way to distance the new Bond from what preceded would be precisely to take the opposite view and introduce the audience to a fully established world of espionage.

    It will of course depend on whether Craig's supporting cast returns in Bond 26, but in the case it doesn't, it might be relevant and original to see Bond interacting with a new M (as in Goldeneye in a way) and while visiting his former superior. This could just be the occasion to bring Ralph Fiennes back as he expressed his desire to continue to be part of the series. Therefore, using Benson's situation, and why not make it the starting point of the story as in Facts of Death, albeit taking another direction, could be a bright idea.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    edited May 10 Posts: 14,731
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.

    I probably wouldn't, because it's fairly terrible! :D

    It's been a long time since I last read it but I remember it being a decent enough plot and Bond novel in general. It could still be used as a starting point for a new Bond film plot.

    I tried reading it again about two years ago and I had to give up, it’s absolutely dreadful stuff- there’s a car chase where it really literally is just Bond pushing buttons. The baddies are a secret society who worship Pythagoras and triangles: there’s really nothing worth keeping there.

    I've not read it since I bought it in 1999 but I remember being impressed with the villain Konstantin Romanos and his organisation Decada which was like a trial run by Benson for the Union which first appeared in his next novel, High Time to Kill (1999). Granted, the Benson novels did tend to ape the sort of gadgets in cars that were featuring in the Brosnan Bond films at the time and in some of the earlier films. The brief from Glidrose was to bring the books in line with the current films with having a female M etc. so Benson was merely following that creative directive through in his Bond novels. In fact the groundwork towards that position had even started with the preceding John Gardner novels as the end of his last book Cold (1996) saw Bond about to go to meet the new female M after the retirement of the ailing Sir Miles Messervy.

    If The Facts of Death were to be used at all (a big "if" I would imagine given the past history of the Bond continuations and Eon) then it would most likely only be adapted in part with original material making up the rest of the script. I don't think a full adaptation of any Bond continuation novel is really on the cards at the minute, especially while Michael G. Wilson is at helm. The Facts of Death (or any other continuation novel for that matter) could also be used, as @Herr_Stockmann suggests above, as a creative springboard should the writers find themselves between a rock and a hard place. In fact, it was just that type of creative bind during the writing of Spectre that led to the decision to adapt the torture scene from Colonel Sun when other original ideas weren't felt to be working in the scene between Blofeld and Bond.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    edited May 10 Posts: 8,381
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.

    I probably wouldn't, because it's fairly terrible! :D

    It's been a long time since I last read it but I remember it being a decent enough plot and Bond novel in general. It could still be used as a starting point for a new Bond film plot.

    I tried reading it again about two years ago and I had to give up, it’s absolutely dreadful stuff- there’s a car chase where it really literally is just Bond pushing buttons. The baddies are a secret society who worship Pythagoras and triangles: there’s really nothing worth keeping there.

    I've not read it since I bought it in 1999 but I remember being impressed with the villain Konstantin Romanos and his organisation Decada which was like a trial run by Benson for the Union which first appeared in his next novel, High Time to Kill (1999). Granted, the Benson novels did tend to ape the sort of gadgets in cars that were featuring in the Brosnan Bond films at the time and in some of the earlier films. The brief from Glidrose was to bring the books in line with the current films with having a female M etc. so Benson was merely following that creative directive through in his Bond novels.

    Well no; it’s not the presence of gadgets which makes it bad: it’s that it’s extremely badly written. The problem is not that he was following their creative directive, the problem was that he was just a terrible writer.

    Going to the old M’s place for dinner is fine (although not exactly fascinating or hugely exciting), but if that made it into a film we’d just get lots of people complaining about ‘Scooby gangs’ and Bond not being on his own enough etc.
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    edited May 10 Posts: 14,731
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    mtm wrote: »
    M_Balje wrote: »

    Another Bond movie take place in VS or go to Ireland, Cypres.

    Cyprus is a good thought: interesting political backdrop too.

    Further to Pierce2Daniel's point about the Instagram generation, I wonder if Matera is the sort of destination we can expect to see more of i.e. slightly less well-known but extremely photogenic locations which Bond can sort of 'claim' onscreen.

    In that regard Eon could consider adapting in some way Raymond Benson's second Bond continuation novel The Facts of Death (1998). The novel's plot deals with Cyprus, Turkey and the UK from a geopolitical standpoint.

    I probably wouldn't, because it's fairly terrible! :D

    It's been a long time since I last read it but I remember it being a decent enough plot and Bond novel in general. It could still be used as a starting point for a new Bond film plot.

    I tried reading it again about two years ago and I had to give up, it’s absolutely dreadful stuff- there’s a car chase where it really literally is just Bond pushing buttons. The baddies are a secret society who worship Pythagoras and triangles: there’s really nothing worth keeping there.

    I've not read it since I bought it in 1999 but I remember being impressed with the villain Konstantin Romanos and his organisation Decada which was like a trial run by Benson for the Union which first appeared in his next novel, High Time to Kill (1999). Granted, the Benson novels did tend to ape the sort of gadgets in cars that were featuring in the Brosnan Bond films at the time and in some of the earlier films. The brief from Glidrose was to bring the books in line with the current films with having a female M etc. so Benson was merely following that creative directive through in his Bond novels.

    Well no; it’s not the presence of gadgets which makes it bad: it’s that it’s extremely badly written. The problem is not that he was following their creative directive, the problem was that he was just a terrible writer.

    Going to the old M’s place for dinner is fine (although not exactly fascinating or hugely exciting), but if that made it into a film we’d just get lots of people complaining about ‘Scooby gangs’ and Bond not being on his own enough etc.

    Well, that's fair enough. I know Benson doesn't have a huge amount of fans in the online Bond community but I thought his books were passable for what they were. However, he wasn't really a writer and the Bond novels were his first works of fiction. He has went on to write his own fiction outside of Bond and has much more experience as a writer now. I'm much more a fan of Gardner myself who was a seasoned spy novelist but I don't feel the need to be unkind about Benson either. I know his Bond novels weren't everyone's cup of tea and criticism of him is to be expected. That said, he has his fanbase out there too just like any other Bond continuation author.
  • edited May 11 Posts: 497
    mtm wrote: »
    Going to the old M’s place for dinner is fine (although not exactly fascinating or hugely exciting), but if that made it into a film we’d just get lots of people complaining about ‘Scooby gangs’ and Bond not being on his own enough etc.

    I don't know... People spoke about ‘Scooby gang’ because Q and Moneypenny were on the field and played an active role in solving the mission, rather than being secondary characters confined to a reduced appearance at the MI6 HQ. Begin a story with a sequence taking place at a dinner party attended by both the current and former M, serving as a starting point to the plot by leading Bond on a mission somewhere in a foreign country would be something radically different (as long as neither M takes part in the mission of course). I don't see why people would complain.
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 4,466
    Since62 wrote: »
    Unfortunately for T Dalton and everyone else involved: the Bond films were not "fresh" in the film market at the time. Secondly, the scripts were lame. With Bond already regarded as not fresh, wan stories and direction made the films even more vulnerable. On the prior occasion on which Bond was not highly regarded was following TMWTGG. It was not funded well. The producers cranked it out quickly following LALD. LALD got more interest due to having a new Bond actor. TSWLM, the follow-up to TMWTGG was a spectacular film, which reminded people why the Bond films had been popular. It came on strong and was FUN. If it copied anything, it copied prior Bond films, NOT whatever trend was popular in pop-films at the time. (Unfortunately, the producers went back to following trends and not setting them with MR, which did great box-office, but was an inferior film.) OP again got Bond up with a FUN, exotic story and film unlike other movies of the day. AVTAK was a let-down, with the star poorly paired, casting-wise, with the leading lady. TLD needed more than just a new Bond actor to make it interesting...and did not quite deliver. T Dalton was not served well by the script in either of his films, very unfortunately. I don't think "a serious Bond" bothered people. It was just that the films were not spectacular, fun or unique films you could see only in a Bond movie. LTK, in particular, was far too similar to a story that was already cliche by then -- cop goes rogue to get the drug lord and this time it's personal...good grief HOW many films were described by that summary ?!!? The teen-jealousy sub-plot certainly did not help. The villains in T Dalton's films were not larger than life, and were rather run of the mill. From what I've read, TD's third Bond film, were it made, may have been rather like TSWLM -- not in terms of a silly factor, but in terms of bringing back a spectacle unseen in other films. Fun and unique to Bond. They just should have gotten to that right off in TD's first film.

    I disagree. As a teen, I remember vividly what a breath of fresh air TLD was, following the somnolent, geriatric AVTAK. The PTS had a younger Bond doing his own stunts, then a heavy dose of actual Fleming...

    TLD has an amiable blend of fun and edge and it felt much younger and revitalized. True, the villains were not great and the third act falls apart, but that's true of many Bond films.
  • Posts: 616
    Please note I wrote the phrase as "fresh in the film market" at the time. During Moore's term the producers got a bunch of films out, and quickly. They developed a reputation of being letdowns at least as often as entertaining...perhaps more often. So, sure, Dalton came along as fresh to a Bond fan. But to film-goers generally, meh. The two scripts were dull. Other films -- even though less glamorous and with less of a lasting entertainment value after all these years -- were better received by film goers. TLD was the 16th ranked film by Box Office that year. Well ahead were Beverly Hills Cop II (the SEQUEL not the first one !), 3 Men and a Baby, The Untouchables (with a former Bond in a crucial role, who made all the difference in the film), Lethal Weapon behind Stakeout, Predator, the awful and unfunny Dragnet, Robocop, and Outrageous Fortune. Plenty of the top 15 cannot even be easily recalled ! At any rate, just comparing Bond films with each other, these two had bland scripts. People go on and on about Dalton being "truest to Fleming's Bond" but it certainly was not well-served by those scripts and direction...
  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 4,466
    The public's taste in the '80s and the quality of TLD and LTK are two different things, though.

    Dalton was ahead of his time, both in terms of incorporating Fleming and in taking the films in a dark direction (Batman was a huge hit at the time).
  • Posts: 616
    Batman was an exciting film. TLD and LTK were snores. LTK, in particular, told a story audiences had seen on tv countless times by then -- rogue cop goes after drug lord and this time it's personal...cliche...
  • Posts: 2,404
    Since62 wrote: »
    Batman was an exciting film. TLD and LTK were snores. LTK, in particular, told a story audiences had seen on tv countless times by then -- rogue cop goes after drug lord and this time it's personal...cliche...

    I would not say that TLD and LTK were snores. I watched LTK for the first time in 1998 so I did not have the context of what was on TV at the time.
  • Since62 wrote: »
    Batman was an exciting film. TLD and LTK were snores. LTK, in particular, told a story audiences had seen on tv countless times by then -- rogue cop goes after drug lord and this time it's personal...cliche...

    I disagree about TLD and LTK. I’ll admit that as a kid, those two didn’t capture my imagination the way the Connery/Moore/Brosnan era’s did, but in the context of what the Craig era has done (even if it’s not my favorite), me reading the books, and also me aging and becoming more mature, I’ve come to find both TLD and LTK as films I really love and respect.

    And as far as Dalton, he’s never really been an absolute favorite of mine, and it’s been previously stated in this thread that Dalton didn’t have the star studded prowess of some of the other Bonds, and he certainly does lack swagger. But in a weird way, that’s what draws me too him. He has some enduring quality that I like and whenever I do watch his films, I always find myself rooting for him for reasons other than just “he’s James Bond, he has to win and save the day.”
  • Posts: 2,348
    Since62 wrote: »
    Batman was an exciting film. TLD and LTK were snores. LTK, in particular, told a story audiences had seen on tv countless times by then -- rogue cop goes after drug lord and this time it's personal...cliche...

    Totally disagree, but then again I would as both TLD and LTK are in my top 10 (LTK is in my top 5).
  • Posts: 37
    LTK is one of my favorite Bond flicks.

    Santos and Dario are terrific.
    The glamorous, aspirational and exotic tone is very suited to the Instagram crowd. Another generation of Bond fans in the making.

    This is really, really smart. I don't think they'll go the A24 route though, and I love many films from A24, but they haven't produced a massive box office smash yet.

    I think it will combine what you said above with the following
    kenton wrote: »
    I think it will go in a totally different direction and have more of a modern Roger Moore era 'fun vibe' ala the superhero films of James Gunn/Taika Waititi



  • Posts: 4,414
    Back on track, I'm I right in saying that for every new actor, there has been a change in tone? They can hardly go down a darker route can they? A lighter tone has to be the direction, surely?
  • ImpertinentGoonImpertinentGoon Everybody needs a hobby.
    Posts: 610
    patb wrote: »
    Back on track, I'm I right in saying that for every new actor, there has been a change in tone? They can hardly go down a darker route can they? A lighter tone has to be the direction, surely?

    Connery to Lazenby back to Connery wasn't a huge change in tone on the level of DAD to CR, I would say.

    And they could of course either stay the course or go full John Wick hardcore-action with the next guy. I think that is very unlikely, not impossible.
    But in general it is the prevailing opinion and mine, too, that they will go lighter. If they stay true to form and try to follow trends in blockbuster filmmaking, I would think they try to have the next guy be somewhere in the Marvel and specifically Captain America/Black Panther zone. Not straight up comedies, but some purposefully placed lighter scenes and 'banter' in between the bombast and melodrama that make up the meat of the story.
    (Although NTTD might already get there with Q and Moneypenny specifically)
  • Mendes4LyfeMendes4Lyfe "I need a year off" Craig
    Posts: 7,305
    patb wrote: »
    Back on track, I'm I right in saying that for every new actor, there has been a change in tone? They can hardly go down a darker route can they? A lighter tone has to be the direction, surely?

    Connery to Lazenby back to Connery wasn't a huge change in tone on the level of DAD to CR, I would say.

    And they could of course either stay the course or go full John Wick hardcore-action with the next guy. I think that is very unlikely, not impossible.
    But in general it is the prevailing opinion and mine, too, that they will go lighter. If they stay true to form and try to follow trends in blockbuster filmmaking, I would think they try to have the next guy be somewhere in the Marvel and specifically Captain America/Black Panther zone. Not straight up comedies, but some purposefully placed lighter scenes and 'banter' in between the bombast and melodrama that make up the meat of the story.
    (Although NTTD might already get there with Q and Moneypenny specifically)

    Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace were basically like John Wick already in terms of hard-hitting action.
  • edited May 16 Posts: 497
    If they stay true to form and try to follow trends in blockbuster filmmaking, I would think they try to have the next guy be somewhere in the Marvel and specifically Captain America/Black Panther zone. Not straight up comedies, but some purposefully placed lighter scenes and 'banter' in between the bombast and melodrama that make up the meat of the story.
    These two are indeed plausible as possible inspirations for the next Bond era, even though these two franchises are quite different between, on the one hand, a grim and cold realism and, on the other, a rather colorful futurism. I'm not saying that the two can't serve as inspiration, but between Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Black Panther, these are two rather distant approaches to the same genre, especially in terms of color palettes or the treatment of reality and technology.

    While I wouldn't mind a Bond in the vein of any of these two series, it would be two very different approaches, especially in visual terms.
  • mtmmtm United Kingdom
    Posts: 8,381
    patb wrote: »
    Back on track, I'm I right in saying that for every new actor, there has been a change in tone? They can hardly go down a darker route can they? A lighter tone has to be the direction, surely?

    Connery to Lazenby back to Connery wasn't a huge change in tone on the level of DAD to CR, I would say.

    Connery to Moore wasn't a big change, I'd say. But I get what Patb is saying and it does seem likely: basically Bond films are about Bond himself, so it makes sense that a change in style from how he's played (which seems kind of inevitable) will affect the entire film given he's right at the centre of it.

  • Jordo007Jordo007 Merseyside
    Posts: 938
    I suspect it'll be a Goldeneye style shift, lean more on the iconography of the series and less of a deep analysis of his character. Hopefully the script is as strong as Goldeneye, if that is the plan. I doubt they'll want to reboot with a new actor so soon after Daniel, I think they'll just pick up with a new film and new era without explaining how we got there
  • edited May 16 Posts: 497
    Jordo007 wrote: »
    I suspect it'll be a Goldeneye style shift, lean more on the iconography of the series and less of a deep analysis of his character. Hopefully the script is as strong as Goldeneye, if that is the plan. I doubt they'll want to reboot with a new actor so soon after Daniel, I think they'll just pick up with a new film and new era without explaining how we got there

    It depends on what you mean by a reboot, but if Bond 26 is any close to Goldeneye (a reintroduction to Bond, a new M, a new Moneypenny, no reference to past installments), it will be consider as such. Particularly after the Craig era that was more or less developed around a storyline and recurring characters. In many ways I agree that we're heading toward a new Goldeneye, leaning on the classic iconography of the series as you say, but, by doing so, it would be a (soft-)reboot.
  • DenbighDenbigh UK
    edited May 16 Posts: 4,623
    I think it could also very much be the case as films and television shows seem to be veering away from the origin story. It was an interesting exploration at the time of Casino Royale, but now, in a new era of cinema and even television, I think it's understood that it is interesting now to just jump right in - but we'll see.

    I do think this is another area the possible success of The Batman could inspire, seeing as this is an introduction to a new younger actor in an iconic role, but not an origin story.
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