Anthony Horowitz's Bond novel - Forever and a Day

1181921232438

Comments

  • RemingtonRemington I'll do anything for a woman with a knife.
    Posts: 1,499
    US cover for Forever And A Day

    cHS5DH4.jpg

    Beautiful.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 14,391
    US cover for Forever And A Day

    cHS5DH4.jpg

    That's actually one of the better US edition covers I've seen in a while. Looks kind of like a mix of a 60's crime paperback and a holiday ad from the same era.

    Oh noooooo!
    PussyNoMore thinks this one looks like the front of a club med travel brochure.
    Whatever are they thinking about ?
    Surely its only merit is to try and make the UK edition look good which it isn’t !

    Seen them worse, to be honest. One thing though; if they've tried to make it look like a retro early 50's cover, I think the riviera image looks a bit too modern (could have toned down the colours a bit, for example). Would have been interesting to see a more illustrative approach - if only an illustration of a boat at speed, or something else relating to the story.

    I like the simplicity of the covers of a couple of Horowitz's more recent books:
    The-Word-is-Murder.jpg
    41TDQZ5XDsL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
    Not an illustration style suitable for Bond, necessarily, but it's interesting to see that illustrations have been used for some of his other titles.
  • Posts: 512
    US cover for Forever And A Day

    cHS5DH4.jpg

    That's actually one of the better US edition covers I've seen in a while. Looks kind of like a mix of a 60's crime paperback and a holiday ad from the same era.

    Oh noooooo!
    PussyNoMore thinks this one looks like the front of a club med travel brochure.
    Whatever are they thinking about ?
    Surely its only merit is to try and make the UK edition look good which it isn’t !

    Seen them worse, to be honest. One thing though; if they've tried to make it look like a retro early 50's cover, I think the riviera image looks a bit too modern (could have toned down the colours a bit, for example). Would have been interesting to see a more illustrative approach - if only an illustration of a boat at speed, or something else relating to the story.

    I like the simplicity of the covers of a couple of Horowitz's more recent books:
    The-Word-is-Murder.jpg
    41TDQZ5XDsL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
    Not an illustration style suitable for Bond, necessarily, but it's interesting to see that illustrations have been used for some of his other titles.

    PussyNoMore agrees with you that these two artworks are superficially more attractive. Pussy uses the ‘superficial ‘ word because he doesn’t know what lies between the covers. If they portray the essence of the stories that they represent, they could even be considered good.

    FAAD on the other hand is just mind numbingly average on both sides of the Atlantic but if Pussy has to choose, and He has to, it would be the U.K. edition.

    The last good US hardback first edition was actually DMC. It had a nice strong ‘Mad Men’ type retro feel to it. The Pussy kept that in preference to the U.K. release which was dross.


  • DoctorNoDoctorNo USA-Maryland
    Posts: 658
    Amazon US shows UK Cover version for sale... I prefer the new one, but like them both well enough.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 640
    Talking of cover, I recently saw that the UK version is a dusk jacket. Can we take a second for explain me why these kind of thing STILL EXIST? I mean, dusk jacket have literraly have all disadvantage possible and no advantage at all. Do you like have a flying/removable cover in paper that you fearing to lost one day ? Do you like the constant fear of tear up the paper each time you hold the book ? Do like have a cover in paper? Or do you like the fact that it's always falls off of the book? In any case: why do they think that I would to have the possibily of remove the covers of my books?

    I mean the only advantage the dusk jackets could have if it's the real cover (in cardboard) under it was beautifull. But no, it's never the case : the real cover of dusk jackets are always horribles, just simple monochromes. So why the heck is so popular and Bond's book continue to have these?
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 14,391
    US cover for Forever And A Day

    cHS5DH4.jpg

    That's actually one of the better US edition covers I've seen in a while. Looks kind of like a mix of a 60's crime paperback and a holiday ad from the same era.

    Oh noooooo!
    PussyNoMore thinks this one looks like the front of a club med travel brochure.
    Whatever are they thinking about ?
    Surely its only merit is to try and make the UK edition look good which it isn’t !

    Seen them worse, to be honest. One thing though; if they've tried to make it look like a retro early 50's cover, I think the riviera image looks a bit too modern (could have toned down the colours a bit, for example). Would have been interesting to see a more illustrative approach - if only an illustration of a boat at speed, or something else relating to the story.

    I like the simplicity of the covers of a couple of Horowitz's more recent books:
    The-Word-is-Murder.jpg
    41TDQZ5XDsL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
    Not an illustration style suitable for Bond, necessarily, but it's interesting to see that illustrations have been used for some of his other titles.

    PussyNoMore agrees with you that these two artworks are superficially more attractive. Pussy uses the ‘superficial ‘ word because he doesn’t know what lies between the covers. If they portray the essence of the stories that they represent, they could even be considered good.

    This is indeed an important point. I've come across more than a few covers I didn't appreciate upon reading the books they were designed for, but after finishing the novel, I found the covers very appropriate - and good even. The always so present challenge for a book cover designer, is to portray the text in a good and functional manner, while drawing the attention of the customer in the bookstore. You are one of a kind to succeed perfectly every time. Not to mention that a cover can look fantastic in someones eyes, and horrible in others. The UK/US covers for FAAD just an example here on this thread!

    There's a interesting (and quite funny) TED talk with Chip Kidd on the matter of book covers on Youtube (it's the first video that comes up if you search his name). That talk was used as a reference to the subject of book covers by one of my teachers, when I was studying graphic design some years back.
    FAAD on the other hand is just mind numbingly average on both sides of the Atlantic but if Pussy has to choose, and He has to, it would be the U.K. edition.

    The last good US hardback first edition was actually DMC. It had a nice strong ‘Mad Men’ type retro feel to it. The Pussy kept that in preference to the U.K. release which was dross.

    Is it this one you're thinking of?
    devil-may-care-US-edition.jpg
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 14,391
    Talking of cover, I recently saw that the UK version is a dusk jacket. Can we take a second for explain me why these kind of thing STILL EXIST? I mean, dusk jacket have literraly have all disadvantage possible and no advantage at all. Do you like have a flying/removable cover in paper that you fearing to lost one day ? Do you like the constant fear of tear up the paper each time you hold the book ? Do like have a cover in paper? Or do you like the fact that it's always falls off of the book? In any case: why do they think that I would to have the possibily of remove the covers of my books?

    I mean the only advantage the dusk jackets could have if it's the real cover (in cardboard) under it was beautifull. But no, it's never the case : the real cover of dusk jackets are always horribles, just simple monochromes. So why the heck is so popular and Bond's book continue to have these?

    The practical usage of a dust jacket is limited, of course. It does protect against small wear, like tiny scratches on the surface of the book. This has happened to some older books I have where the dust jacket has been thrown (not by me), or books published without one. I have a Norwegian edition of LALD which was published dust jacket-free - identical to this one:
    Gullbok.jpg

    It, of course, have wear to it. On one book I have, I was unfortunate enough to spill coffee on the dust jacket. Luckily the dust jacket was a glossy one, and the coffee could be wiped off without leaving any stains on the book itself - and even the dust jacket.

    The inside flaps also sometimes provides additional information you won't necessarily be able to have place for on the back of the book. There are of course other ways publishers could have done this - but it's easy to just place it on the flaps.

    In 2018 there is of course possible to print 'full-coloured' covers with illustrations or images straight onto the book, instead of the 'simple monochromes' you mention (I think I have a couple of books with the full cover printed onto the book itself - with an additional dust jacket around them). I think however, that printing straight onto the book - instead of a glossy paper dust jacket and a pasteboard(?*) cover with nothing much on it - is more expensive that printing the full-coloured cover on cheap paper.

    *my English fails me here, I'm afraid - 'pasteboard' is the correct word to use, right?
  • Posts: 640
    Yes, there is good arguments in it, espically the coffee one x)
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 14,391
    Yes, there is good arguments in it, espically the coffee one x)

    That would be my main one! Hate to think how that book would have looked like hadn't the dust jacket been there. I once spilled hot cocoa on a paperback. That book looks like it's been dragged through the mud.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 623
    Here's some Horowitz book signing dates, from thebookbond site.

    Waterstones Leadenhall: Lunchtime signing (June 1st)
    Southbank Centre, Royal Festival Hall (June 1st)
    Waterstones, Canterbury (June 6th)
    Daunt Books, Marylebone (June 7th)
    Waterstones Glasgow: Lunchtime signing (June 11th)
    Waterstones Edinburgh (June 11th)
    Waterstones Manchester (June 12th)
    Waterstones Reading (June 13th)
    Waterstones Brighton (June 14th)
    Chiswick Book Festival (Sept. 15th)
    Appledore Literary Festival (Sept. 22nd)
    Henley Literary Festival (Oct. 3rd)
    Cheltenham Literary Festival (Oct. 6th)

    https://www.thebookbond.com/2018/05/anthony-horowitz-appearance-schedule.html?spref=fb
  • Posts: 512

    *my English fails me here, I'm afraid - 'pasteboard' is the correct word to use, right?

    Your English is excellent but the correct word for a hardback front and back is normally just “the boards”.

  • Posts: 512
    FAAD on the other hand is just mind numbingly average on both sides of the Atlantic but if Pussy has to choose, and He has to, it would be the U.K. edition.

    The last good US hardback first edition was actually DMC. It had a nice strong ‘Mad Men’ type retro feel to it. The Pussy kept that in preference to the U.K. release which was dross.

    Is it this one you're thinking of?
    devil-may-care-US-edition.jpg

    Yes it is.
    PussyNoMore quite likes this one. It’s not perfect but it’s good.
    Other than the fabulous Richie Fahey covers for Penguin, this is one of the rare occasions that our American brethren did something better.
    The art has a nice, retro, ‘Mad Men’ feel to it and is infinitely better than the U.K. first edition.
  • Posts: 512
    There is a great review of FAAD over at literary007.com
    Tom Cull really knows his Bond and his opinion bodes well.
    Roll on next Friday.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 617
    Just got confirmation mine is shipping! How is everyone celebrating Fleming's 110th birthday today?
  • Posts: 14,391

    *my English fails me here, I'm afraid - 'pasteboard' is the correct word to use, right?

    Your English is excellent but the correct word for a hardback front and back is normally just “the boards”.

    Didn't know that. Thanks for telling me! :-)

    FAAD on the other hand is just mind numbingly average on both sides of the Atlantic but if Pussy has to choose, and He has to, it would be the U.K. edition.

    The last good US hardback first edition was actually DMC. It had a nice strong ‘Mad Men’ type retro feel to it. The Pussy kept that in preference to the U.K. release which was dross.

    Is it this one you're thinking of?
    devil-may-care-US-edition.jpg

    Yes it is.
    PussyNoMore quite likes this one. It’s not perfect but it’s good.
    Other than the fabulous Richie Fahey covers for Penguin, this is one of the rare occasions that our American brethren did something better.
    The art has a nice, retro, ‘Mad Men’ feel to it and is infinitely better than the U.K. first edition.

    Yes, that's a really nice cover. The typography is bold and simple, and I quite like that it's placed in perspective. That's something you don't see that often. The illustration is smart, I think. Don't want the cover telling me how I should picture Bond when reading the novel. Here are a couple of unused illustrations by the same illustrator, Mark Stutzman. They are really nice, but not how I picture Bond in the books:
  • PropertyOfALadyPropertyOfALady Colders Federation CEO
    Posts: 3,497
    Is it just me, or does that look like a young Brosnan?
  • DragonpolDragonpol The Crazy World of David Dragonpol
    Posts: 13,424
    Is it just me, or does that look like a young Brosnan?

    To me, it always looks like Bond is letting off bright red wind in the second picture. But of course I'm silly like that. ;)
  • BMWTREKPSEBMWTREKPSE Colorado
    Posts: 96
    shamanimal wrote: »
    Here's some Horowitz book signing dates, from thebookbond site.

    Waterstones Leadenhall: Lunchtime signing (June 1st)
    Southbank Centre, Royal Festival Hall (June 1st)
    Waterstones, Canterbury (June 6th)
    Daunt Books, Marylebone (June 7th)
    Waterstones Glasgow: Lunchtime signing (June 11th)
    Waterstones Edinburgh (June 11th)
    Waterstones Manchester (June 12th)
    Waterstones Reading (June 13th)
    Waterstones Brighton (June 14th)
    Chiswick Book Festival (Sept. 15th)
    Appledore Literary Festival (Sept. 22nd)
    Henley Literary Festival (Oct. 3rd)
    Cheltenham Literary Festival (Oct. 6th)

    https://www.thebookbond.com/2018/05/anthony-horowitz-appearance-schedule.html?spref=fb

    If anyone is going to one of these would you be willing to get one signed and send it to me across the pond (I can PayPal you or something???)
  • Posts: 512
    The first chapter of FAAD has been published on the Penguin site.
    It reads incredibly well. PussyNoMore’s excitement cup runneths over.
  • zebrafishzebrafish <°)))< in Octopussy's garden in the shade
    Posts: 2,917
    PussyNoMore forgot the link to chapter one.
  • Posts: 623
    Mine's arrived at Waterstones. I'm off to pick it up now.
  • Posts: 7,599
    My copy has been shipped, so come on Royal Mail do your bloody best for once.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 623
    Mine arrived at Wolverhampton Waterstones at 3pm.

    001.jpg

    It's better presented than Trigger Mortis, for my money. The Waterstones version has a sticker saying 'exclusive Fleming content', which is two pages of Fleming's notes, at the back, with a forward by Horowitz. This is much less than the Waterstones version of Trigger Mortis, which had six or seven pages. But still essential to the Fleming enthusiast. I'm wondering if there's versions of this book around without these pages in?

    004.jpg

    006.jpg

    Here's the signature (or stamp, if you prefer).

    003.jpg

    The page ends have a yellow tint, which is most pleasing with the dark blue cover. The title is embossed, it's lovely.

    005.jpg

    007.jpg

    And the content? I'm on chapter six, and it's fantastic. I won't post spoilers but I will tell you about one charming bit that won't spoil anything. When Bond meets his secretary (miss Ponsonby) for the first time, and sees his office, he tells her to get an ashtray, and tells her how he likes his coffee. It makes you wince a little, because it's 2018, and men shouldn't order secretaries round like that anymore. But this is just how it would have been in the early fifties. Then he tells her (in a quieter voice) how he's going to find (the previous) 007's killer, and how he knows they must have been close.
    And you see that despite the implied misogyny, he's actually a proper hero. A real old school good guy, who you're on the side of. You get the same feeling when you read Fleming.
    And this is Horowitz's strength. As well as being an ace storyteller, he understands Fleming's Bond in a way that few of the continuation authors do. We're in Bond's world. Horowitz is a gift to Fleming fans. He knows what made the Fleming books so readable, and does the same in a skilful way.
  • Agent_99Agent_99 enjoys a spirited ride as much as the next girl
    Posts: 2,404
    Ah, thanks, @shamanimal, I'm proper excited now!

    Hope mine arrives on/before Thursday...
  • Posts: 2,040
    Very useful post @shamanimal, thank you, especially for the note about the Fleming content at the back. Now I shall have to figure out a way to get the Waterstones edition outside the UK for a decent price.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 14,391
    Is it just the image, or is the water on the cover a bit bluer than the cover image they released online?
    38460023.jpg

    Like the way the did the golden print on the boards (thanks again for telling me the correct word to use, @PussyNoMore). A little more details and the title/Horowitz's name, and you almost have a decent cover with these elements alone.
  • mybudgetbondmybudgetbond The World
    Posts: 177
    I’m very jealous of all those who managed to get an early copy of from Waterstone’s. I will have to wait until my preorder from iBooks is delivered to my iPad. Can’t wait to read it!

  • Posts: 623
    Revelator wrote: »
    Very useful post @shamanimal, thank you, especially for the note about the Fleming content at the back. Now I shall have to figure out a way to get the Waterstones edition outside the UK for a decent price.

    According to the Horowitz notes in Trigger Mortis, there were nine Fleming 'treatments' for the TV series. Five were used in later Bond novels, and Horowitz had the choice of the remaining, unseen four.
    So we've had two so far .... that means there's two more. It's interesting stuff for those into Fleming. So far we've had 'Murder on Wheels' (used in Trigger Mortis) and Russian Roulette (used in the new book). So I wonder what are the other two?
    And what were the ones that were used later called? In the back of Forever and a Day, Horowitz says that they were used in the two short story books, (FYEO and OP/TLD). But there's eight (I think) short stories in those two books. So which five were taken from the proposed TV treatments?

  • echoecho 007 in New York
    Posts: 4,042
    shamanimal wrote: »
    Revelator wrote: »
    Very useful post @shamanimal, thank you, especially for the note about the Fleming content at the back. Now I shall have to figure out a way to get the Waterstones edition outside the UK for a decent price.

    According to the Horowitz notes in Trigger Mortis, there were nine Fleming 'treatments' for the TV series. Five were used in later Bond novels, and Horowitz had the choice of the remaining, unseen four.
    So we've had two so far .... that means there's two more. It's interesting stuff for those into Fleming. So far we've had 'Murder on Wheels' (used in Trigger Mortis) and Russian Roulette (used in the new book). So I wonder what are the other two?
    And what were the ones that were used later called? In the back of Forever and a Day, Horowitz says that they were used in the two short story books, (FYEO and OP/TLD). But there's eight (I think) short stories in those two books. So which five were taken from the proposed TV treatments?

    I believe those are FYEO, THR, R, OP, and TLD.

    FAVTAK was the background for Drax in MR. TPOAL was from Sotheby's catalog. QoS doesn't feel like a TV script. 007 in NY can't be one.

    But I could be wrong.
  • edited May 2018 Posts: 2,495
    shamanimal wrote: »
    Mine arrived at Wolverhampton Waterstones at 3pm.

    001.jpg

    It's better presented than Trigger Mortis, for my money. The Waterstones version has a sticker saying 'exclusive Fleming content', which is two pages of Fleming's notes, at the back, with a forward by Horowitz. This is much less than the Waterstones version of Trigger Mortis, which had six or seven pages. But still essential to the Fleming enthusiast. I'm wondering if there's versions of this book around without these pages in?

    004.jpg

    006.jpg

    Here's the signature (or stamp, if you prefer).

    003.jpg

    The page ends have a yellow tint, which is most pleasing with the dark blue cover. The title is embossed, it's lovely.

    005.jpg

    007.jpg

    And the content? I'm on chapter six, and it's fantastic. I won't post spoilers but I will tell you about one charming bit that won't spoil anything. When Bond meets his secretary (miss Ponsonby) for the first time, and sees his office, he tells her to get an ashtray, and tells her how he likes his coffee. It makes you wince a little, because it's 2018, and men shouldn't order secretaries round like that anymore. But this is just how it would have been in the early fifties. Then he tells her (in a quieter voice) how he's going to find (the previous) 007's killer, and how he knows they must have been close.
    And you see that despite the implied misogyny, he's actually a proper hero. A real old school good guy, who you're on the side of. You get the same feeling when you read Fleming.
    And this is Horowitz's strength. As well as being an ace storyteller, he understands Fleming's Bond in a way that few of the continuation authors do. We're in Bond's world. Horowitz is a gift to Fleming fans. He knows what made the Fleming books so readable, and does the same in a skilful way.
    shamanimal wrote: »
    Mine arrived at Wolverhampton Waterstones at 3pm.

    001.jpg

    It's better presented than Trigger Mortis, for my money. The Waterstones version has a sticker saying 'exclusive Fleming content', which is two pages of Fleming's notes, at the back, with a forward by Horowitz. This is much less than the Waterstones version of Trigger Mortis, which had six or seven pages. But still essential to the Fleming enthusiast. I'm wondering if there's versions of this book around without these pages in?

    004.jpg

    006.jpg

    Here's the signature (or stamp, if you prefer).

    003.jpg

    The page ends have a yellow tint, which is most pleasing with the dark blue cover. The title is embossed, it's lovely.

    005.jpg

    007.jpg

    And the content? I'm on chapter six, and it's fantastic. I won't post spoilers but I will tell you about one charming bit that won't spoil anything. When Bond meets his secretary (miss Ponsonby) for the first time, and sees his office, he tells her to get an ashtray, and tells her how he likes his coffee. It makes you wince a little, because it's 2018, and men shouldn't order secretaries round like that anymore. But this is just how it would have been in the early fifties. Then he tells her (in a quieter voice) how he's going to find (the previous) 007's killer, and how he knows they must have been close.
    And you see that despite the implied misogyny, he's actually a proper hero. A real old school good guy, who you're on the side of. You get the same feeling when you read Fleming.
    And this is Horowitz's strength. As well as being an ace storyteller, he understands Fleming's Bond in a way that few of the continuation authors do. We're in Bond's world. Horowitz is a gift to Fleming fans. He knows what made the Fleming books so readable, and does the same in a skilful way.

    Encouraging words! Thanks. It’s wonderful to finally get an author who actually understands Bond. Bond belongs in the 50s and 60s. If we had a modern day Bond, it just wouldn’t seem like we were reading about the real chap. Unfortunately, the reality is, that if we have a contemporary Bond, certain aspects of his personality are changed.

    I’d love to read the Fleming bits but I move around, so I’ve moved on to Kindle and i books which omit the Fleming material. Hardcovers just take up too much room and weigh too much.

    I’m not sure if I should read this book straight away or leave it for a few months like I did with TM (my initials :) ) in order to savor the excitement coupled with the fact that we only get a new Bond book around every two and a half years.

    Happy belated birthday Mr. Fleming! I was on top of the Great Wall of China on May 28, just over four years ago. I always remember the date because of the great man’s birthday.
Sign In or Register to comment.