James Bond and Garth Brooks?

For those not well versed in American country music, recording superstar Garth Brooks had a smash hit in 1990 called "Friends in Low Places." It's a cute inversion of the old warning, "I've got friends in high places!" and it made Brooks' name, in addition to a massive fortune. The song was written by a certain Dewayne Blackwell, born 1939.

But did Blackwell come up with this inversion all on his lonesome?

Most readers probably know where I'm going. In Moonraker (1979), 007 has a conversation with Holly Goodhead, bowling her out as a CIA agent. The following is part of the exchange:

BOND: "Standard CIA equipment and the CIA placed you with Drax, correct?
HOLLY: "Very astute of you, James."
BOND: "Oh, not really. I've got friends in low places."

Obviously, correlation is not causation, but it is entirely possible that Blackwell, 40 years old when Moonraker was released, overheard this line, filed it away mentally for safekeeping, and that it floated back to the surface in '89 or '90 when he was writing his soon-to-be mega hit.

Comments

  • Are you kidding?
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 15,081
    I think It's a fairly common phrase and I see no correlation there at all, I'm sorry to say.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Could be on to something , same with Bond saying " Don't forget to write "" in Goldfinger.
    As in 1977 there was a comedy series by Charles Wood with that very title ! Made by the
    BBC.
    As Connery delivers the line with perfect comedy timing, I'm certain this would have
    Influenced the young Charles Wood, to create​ his comic masterpiece.
  • @PerilgauKhan Nice one Professor Piss
  • Posts: 19,339
    Coincidence I think...Bond is referring to the CIA.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    edited April 2017 Posts: 13,384
    A mouse helped him in Spectre, so Bond does have friends in low places, the scene
    When several other mice arrived to make a beautiful gown for Madeline, was sadly cut
    From the final print.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Friends in low places, lyrics.

    "Blame it all on my roots
    I showed up in boots
    And ruined your black tie affair"

    The black tie affair is obvious, and the boots mentioned are an amazing poignant
    Reminder of Bond's parents death in a climbing accident, in the use of the term
    "Boots" ( climbing boots )

    "The last one to know
    The last one to show
    I was the last one
    You thought you'd see there"

    These lines are addressing the femme fatale, who thinks that she has killed Bond earlier.
    And didn't think she'd see him again .

    "And I saw the surprise
    And the fear in his eyes
    When I took his glass of champagne
    And I toasted you
    Said, honey, we may be through....... "

    This is primarily addressed to the lady's henchman, who also believed Bond to be
    Dead, and is "fearful" at once again seeing Bond, who nonchalantly takes his glass of
    Champagne.

    " ...... But you'll never hear me complain !"

    This closing line is reminiscent of Bond's line about "I'm motivated by my duty "
  • Major_BoothroydMajor_Boothroyd Republic of Isthmus
    Posts: 2,714
    And of course the mention of 'Honey' harks back to the original Bond girl Honeychile Rider. Clearly taking inspiration from Dr No.
  • ThunderpussyThunderpussy My Secret Lair
    Posts: 13,384
    Absolutely ! :D
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 15,081
    Ah, it's all beginning to make sense now.
  • Posts: 2,483
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I think It's a fairly common phrase and I see no correlation there at all, I'm sorry to say.

    If it IS a common phrase--and I have my doubts--it has become so since the song was released, I'm sorry to say.

  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited April 2017 Posts: 15,081
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I think It's a fairly common phrase and I see no correlation there at all, I'm sorry to say.

    If it IS a common phrase--and I have my doubts--it has become so since the song was released, I'm sorry to say.

    Well OK, I'm not an etymologist or whatever so you might have a point here after all, but where is the hard evidence for it and I'm not talking about supposition here?

    In any case, you might find this article of mine (that in wrote in 2010) interesting as I discuss this scene from Moonraker (1979) and its oblique meaning:

    http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/oblique-reference-to-felix-leiter-in_5824.html
  • ggl007ggl007 www.archivo007.com Spain, España
    Posts: 2,482
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    In any case, you might find this article of mine (that in wrote in 2010) interesting as I discuss this scene from Moonraker (1979) and its oblique meaning:

    http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/oblique-reference-to-felix-leiter-in_5824.html

    That reminds me the SPECTRE reference to Felix...
  • Posts: 2,483
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I think It's a fairly common phrase and I see no correlation there at all, I'm sorry to say.

    If it IS a common phrase--and I have my doubts--it has become so since the song was released, I'm sorry to say.

    Well OK, I'm not an etymologist or whatever so you might have a point here after all, but where is the hard evidence for it and I'm not talking about supposition here?

    In any case, you might find this article of mine (that in wrote in 2010) interesting as I discuss this scene from Moonraker (1979) and its oblique meaning:

    http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/oblique-reference-to-felix-leiter-in_5824.html

    Where did I say this was iron-clad truth rather than supposition? Of course it's supposition, and you can take it or leave it.

  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 15,081
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    I think It's a fairly common phrase and I see no correlation there at all, I'm sorry to say.

    If it IS a common phrase--and I have my doubts--it has become so since the song was released, I'm sorry to say.

    Well OK, I'm not an etymologist or whatever so you might have a point here after all, but where is the hard evidence for it and I'm not talking about supposition here?

    In any case, you might find this article of mine (that in wrote in 2010) interesting as I discuss this scene from Moonraker (1979) and its oblique meaning:

    http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/oblique-reference-to-felix-leiter-in_5824.html

    Where did I say this was iron-clad truth rather than supposition? Of course it's supposition, and you can take it or leave it.

    No, I just wanted to say I see what you meant in the OP. At first, like the others, I thought it was just a bit of a piss-take.
  • thedovethedove hiding in the Greek underworld
    Posts: 3,561
    Here I thought this thread was about Garth doing a Bond theme song. Now that would be a risky choice for a singer. Country music Bond?

    As for what this thread is really about. I have to agree with Kahn I don't recall "Friends in Low Places" being in the common vernacular. However I was merely 10 when MR came out so it may be lost in the cobwebs of my mind.
  • Major_BoothroydMajor_Boothroyd Republic of Isthmus
    Posts: 2,714
    I was aware of that saying from a long time ago - I just thought it was just an obvious reversal of phrase. I'd never heard that song. Then again I don't think I've ever heard a Garth Brooks even though I've been aware of him for nearly thirty years. He isn't exactly Townes Van Zandt.
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