Anthony Horowitz's James Bond novel - Trigger Mortis

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  • edited March 2015 Posts: 5,745
    New temp cover:
    71bWBPASgiL.jpg

    I like the color scheme.
  • Posts: 802
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Well @Villiers53, they did not manage to keep hold of Higson who did a splendid job with the young Bond, much better than I ever expected. And that is not even a a-list writer.
    Still have to read the Cole novel.

    Sorry @SaintMark but Charlie Higson was very definitely on the 'A' list of young person's writers before they picked him for 'Young Bond'.
    Perhaps IFP's most creative selection to date was Samantha Weinberg who brought us the phenomenal 'Moneypenny Diaries' and they should be congratulated for that.




  • Posts: 802
    JWESTBROOK wrote: »
    New temp cover:
    71bWBPASgiL.jpg

    I like the color scheme.

    A good placeholder @JWESTBROOK.
    It's going to be interesting to see what direction the cover art takes.
    Although I wasn't initially that impressed, the SOLO UK hardback art has really grown on me over time and I think Random House's Suzane Dean did a great job - it's just a damn shame what rests between the covers.
    That said, the SOLO art has a very '60s feel to it and with Horowitz's novel possibly being set some ten years earlier it will be interesting to see if they don't go for something more indicative of the '50s.

  • 007InVT007InVT Classified
    Posts: 893
    JWESTBROOK wrote: »
    New temp cover:
    71bWBPASgiL.jpg

    I like the color scheme.

    Great stuff. You could go with Project One even or Projekt One - maybe a Russian villain!

  • 007InVT007InVT Classified
    Posts: 893
    Sorry, German villain!
  • 007InVT007InVT Classified
    Posts: 893
    Yes, a 50s feel would be fun. I expect HoneyPot Designs might submit a few ideas for our eyes only.
  • ggl007ggl007 www.archivo007.com Spain, España
    Posts: 2,513
    JWESTBROOK wrote: »
    New temp cover:
    71bWBPASgiL.jpg

    I like the color scheme.
    Is this official??
  • Posts: 1,552
    ggl007 wrote: »
    JWESTBROOK wrote: »
    New temp cover:
    71bWBPASgiL.jpg

    I like the color scheme.
    Is this official??
    http://www.thebookbond.com/ - Apparently so, on Amazon's and Barnes&Nobel's pages at least.
  • Campbell2Campbell2 Epsilon Rho Rho house, Bending State University
    Posts: 299
    I like it, starts to whet the appetite!

  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 16,329
    Campbell2 wrote: »
    I like it, starts to whet the appetite!

    Indeed, it is a thing of beauty. :)
  • edited March 2015 Posts: 2,560
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Writing these modern books is tough as there is the Fleming books and the movies and the publisher wants to cater to both audiences in order to obtain the maximum profit.

    Fleming and the movies are worlds apart, the only successful fusion of the two are perhaps the Christopher Wood novelizations. A tough balance to find as proven by the various great authors that stumbled and never lived up to the expectations.

    Trying to appeal to the movie lovers too is a huge mistake. I don't see how a good Bond book can be written if it's trying to attract both the literary and movie fans. I'm not sure though if this is the case. It certainly was in the Benson era but I'm not sure about now.

    Yeah, if H. does a good job on this book and it sells well, IFP would be insane not to try and get him to sign some sort of a more than one book deal. Will it sell well after the last 3 lacklustre efforts? The marketing department will have their work cut out for them if they have any sense at all.

  • Posts: 802
    Bounine wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Writing these modern books is tough as there is the Fleming books and the movies and the publisher wants to cater to both audiences in order to obtain the maximum profit.

    Fleming and the movies are worlds apart, the only successful fusion of the two are perhaps the Christopher Wood novelizations. A tough balance to find as proven by the various great authors that stumbled and never lived up to the expectations.

    Trying to appeal to the movie lovers too is a huge mistake. I don't see how a good Bond book can be written if it's trying to attract both the literary and movie fans. I'm not sure though if this is the case. It certainly was in the Benson era but I'm not sure about now.

    Yeah, if H. does a good job on this book and it sells well, IFP would be insane not to try and get him to sign some sort of a more than one book deal. Will it sell well after the last 3 lacklustre efforts? The marketing department will have their work cut out for them if they have any sense at all.

    I agree completely with Bounine.
    There is absolutely no point in trying to appease the cinema audience.
    If they are readers — and I suspect many of them have never read a Fleming novel — they will only buy it and read it if the reviews are good. Then they will accept it on its own terms.
    If you try and skew things their way, you will simply through out the baby with the bath water and finish up appealing to nobody — as Benson proved.
    IVNSHO, IFP should be doing a much better job by having the correct contract and relationship with their authors.
    Obviously they should be granting editorial freedom but that should be done within the context of the Bond brand code and they should ultimately reserve the right to refuse inferior product.
    Rumour has it that they weren't happy with Boyd's effort - not a big surprise given that he turned our hero into a voyeuristic, drunk that drove a merde coloured Jensen through a turgid plot that was about as exciting as watching paint dry. Obviously IFP were hoisted by their own petard and obliged to accept this stuff.
    On a positive note, I don't think this will happen with Horowitz. I really think he gets it and when I look at the plot lines of the last 'Foyles War', they were damn exciting stuff. I was also impressed by what he said about the Bond challenge at the Moriarty launch.
    That said — we will see. Figures crossed because as the sales figures have ultimately proved that IFP are well and truly dealing with the laws of diminishing returns. Only a great book will save 007 now!
  • Posts: 7,653
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Well @Villiers53, they did not manage to keep hold of Higson who did a splendid job with the young Bond, much better than I ever expected. And that is not even a a-list writer.
    Still have to read the Cole novel.

    Sorry @SaintMark but Charlie Higson was very definitely on the 'A' list of young person's writers before they picked him for 'Young Bond'.
    Perhaps IFP's most creative selection to date was Samantha Weinberg who brought us the phenomenal 'Moneypenny Diaries' and they should be congratulated for that.

    Agreed on Weinberg, Higson was also new to me as a writer of books.

  • Posts: 1,552
    Was Higson an "A-list" young persons writer before Bond? I know that he had written some novels before Young Bond, but they were aimed at Adults, not younger readers.

    He was mainly known for his comedy writing for sketch shows like The Fast Show, which he also appeared in.

    All of his "non-Bond" young adult novels were published after By Royal Command.
  • Posts: 802
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Well @Villiers53, they did not manage to keep hold of Higson who did a splendid job with the young Bond, much better than I ever expected. And that is not even a a-list writer.
    Still have to read the Cole novel.

    Sorry @SaintMark but Charlie Higson was very definitely on the 'A' list of young person's writers before they picked him for 'Young Bond'.
    Perhaps IFP's most creative selection to date was Samantha Weinberg who brought us the phenomenal 'Moneypenny Diaries' and they should be congratulated for that.

    Agreed on Weinberg, Higson was also new to me as a writer of books.
    JCRendle wrote: »
    Was Higson an "A-list" young persons writer before Bond? I know that he had written some novels before Young Bond, but they were aimed at Adults, not younger readers.

    He was mainly known for his comedy writing for sketch shows like The Fast Show, which he also appeared in.

    All of his "non-Bond" young adult novels were published after By Royal Command.

    Sorry folks, I stand corrected, I thought he wrote 'The Enemy' before Bond.
    His pre 'YB' work was clearly adult.
    IFP should be congratulated for selecting him but chastised for loosing him!
    Unfortunately, I think Cole's effort is pale by comparison.I enjoyed Higson's Bond a lot and thought he did a great job fleshing out 007's formative years and as a victim of the British public school system, I can vouch for his atmospheric descriptions.
    I wonder why he walked?
    It made sense to me when I thought he was continuing 'The Enemy' series but now I've been put straight — must less so.
    Perhaps they wouldn't let him transition into adult Bond with the pre- CR legend? If true, this was a big mistake. He would have been great!
  • Posts: 7,653
    I do remember him saying that he wanted to explore more of his own ideas after the initial 5 book deal, something I can understand with a creative person as Higson. He did however not rule out a return to the series.....
    I think IFP did well with Higson and I ma sure they would love to get him back.
  • Posts: 802
    SaintMark wrote: »
    I do remember him saying that he wanted to explore more of his own ideas after the initial 5 book deal, something I can understand with a creative person as Higson. He did however not rule out a return to the series.....
    I think IFP did well with Higson and I ma sure they would love to get him back.

    I hope so. He made the most skilful interpretation of the character of any of the continuation writers, Kingsley Amis included.
    Whats more, he did it under the constraints of having to produce a 'Young Person's' book. Something that unfortunately probably meant that many of Fleming's readers didn't experience them.
    Sad, because I think they appealed to all ages.

  • Campbell2Campbell2 Epsilon Rho Rho house, Bending State University
    Posts: 299
    I've only read the first three of Higson's, thought they were pretty good. Heard many good things about the last one, too, got to pick up that. Higson made them really adventurous IMO, that's what I missed with some other continuations.
  • Posts: 7,653
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    I do remember him saying that he wanted to explore more of his own ideas after the initial 5 book deal, something I can understand with a creative person as Higson. He did however not rule out a return to the series.....
    I think IFP did well with Higson and I ma sure they would love to get him back.

    I hope so. He made the most skilful interpretation of the character of any of the continuation writers, Kingsley Amis included.
    Whats more, he did it under the constraints of having to produce a 'Young Person's' book. Something that unfortunately probably meant that many of Fleming's readers didn't experience them.
    Sad, because I think they appealed to all ages.

    Hence me owning all of the Higson novels concerning YB. I do not recall which book contained an older James but that was the moment I wanted Higson to write a grown up novel.

    Still I was really in awe with Boyds opening chapters with the WWII James Bond, sadly he could not keep it up, the British honour and all that. :D
  • Posts: 802
    SaintMark wrote: »

    Still I was really in awe with Boyds opening chapters with the WWII James Bond, sadly he could not keep it up, the British honour and all that. :D

    Bizarrely enough, I thought both Faulks' and Boyd's efforts started well then they both went down the pub and got completely smashed!
    As for Deaver, he didn't even bother to get started.

  • Posts: 9,372
    See for me Deaver represents the biggest heart break because it was absolutely everything I wanted in a bond novel

    Modern setting. Check
    00's to be an unknown branch of mi6. Check
    Complete reboot. Check

    I wanted to love it but my issue was bond no matter what decade he is in will have sex with any attractive women over the age of 18 (holly from fyeo is supposed to be 17 yeah I am surpised too) the fact he goes on and on about how hot his secretary is (it's been a while since I read the book) and then doesn't sleep with her really? Plus when you find out the villains goal it's kind of I dunno anti climatic.

    Like I said I just wish we could have a good writer ( even Hutson or Horowitz) come in and do sort of what eon is doing now the events of the Fleming books kind of happened before this book but in the early 2000's and now here is what 007 is doing now.

    Sigh
  • Posts: 802
    Risico007 wrote: »
    See for me Deaver represents the biggest heart break because it was absolutely everything I wanted in a bond novel

    Modern setting. Check
    00's to be an unknown branch of mi6. Check
    Complete reboot. Check
    Sigh

    I understand and admire completely your enthusiasm for a modern literary Bond @Risico007. It's not my preferred route but I get it.
    I can also remember how excited I was reading 'Licence Renewed' in 1981 because although I thought it could have had a stronger plot, it was a great reboot and Gardner created the perfect Bond for the '80s. - He kept the high old tone but updated every aspect.
    Sadly Mr.Deaver failed miserably to do likewise and I thought his politically correct reincarnation was one of the most boring things it has been my displeasure to read.
  • Posts: 4,622
    Deaver's pc Bond, yes, worst Bond book ever.
    Just awful. Shudder.
  • Posts: 802
    I do think that author undertaking the Bond continuation should have as essential reading before their meeting with IFP:
    1) The complete works of Ian Fleming (to understand the master).
    2) Colonel Sun by Kingsley Amis (to understand how a continuation novel should
    be written)
    3) Licence Renewed (to understand how a complete 007 re-boot is possible)
    4) Any Benson stinker (to understand what to avoid)
    5) The celebrity trilogy - DMC, CB, SOLO (to understand how the others have failed.
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ https://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 16,329
    Villiers53 wrote: »
    I do think that author undertaking the Bond continuation should have as essential reading before their meeting with IFP:
    1) The complete works of Ian Fleming (to understand the master).
    2) Colonel Sun by Kingsley Amis (to understand how a continuation novel should
    be written)
    3) Licence Renewed (to understand how a complete 007 re-boot is possible)
    4) Any Benson stinker (to understand what to avoid)
    5) The celebrity trilogy - DMC, CB, SOLO (to understand how the others have failed.


    What of John Pearson?
  • 007InVT007InVT Classified
    Posts: 893
    Sage advice Villiers and totally agree about adding Pearson's 007 biography. My favorite 'continuation' novel of them all. The 5th Beatle so I speak.
  • Posts: 1,552
    007InVT wrote: »
    The 5th Beatle so I speak.
    you're comparing him to Pete Best?!
  • 007InVT007InVT Classified
    Posts: 893
    No, Stuart Sutcliffe!
  • edited March 2015 Posts: 4,622
    007InVT wrote: »
    No, Stuart Sutcliffe!
    yes apt distinction. Best was part of 4 piece Beatles until they smartly kicked him out, and brought in Ringo.
    Interestingly, Rolling Stones didn't take off either, unitl they fired drummer and brought in Charlie Watts as 5th and final piece.

    I do like @villiers list below.
    1) The complete works of Ian Fleming (to understand the master).
    2) Colonel Sun by Kingsley Amis (to understand how a continuation novel should
    be written)
    3) Licence Renewed (to understand how a complete 007 re-boot is possible)
    4) Any Benson stinker (to understand what to avoid)
    5) The celebrity trilogy - DMC, CB, SOLO (to understand how the others have failed.
    However I would also recommend Pearson be included, along with Colonel Sun. The original continuity really comprised Amis and Pearson, and then it was dropped until the Gardner re-boot.

    I am not as hard on Benson, but I do get where @villiers is coming from re Benson.
  • pjvpjv Australia
    edited March 2015 Posts: 15
    Can someone answer a question I have.
    Why have the publishers changed with each new continuation novel.
    I've noticed:
    Devil May Care - Penguin 007
    Carte Blanche - H&S
    Solo - J.Cape
    New Novel - Orion

    I wish they would stay the same.
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