Do you believe in aliens and flying saucers?

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  • BondStuBondStu Moonraker 6
    Posts: 357
    RogueAgent wrote: »
    I have to respectfully disagree. It is naïve to think their is nothing out there? Casing point is all the new species in the deep oceans of our own planet.

    Life as we should all realise takes many different forms and in all shapes and sizes.

    Fair enough - but I'd rather see the human race try and sort itself out and all the problems here on Earth before we start thinking about what might be out there.
  • Posts: 11,919
    BondStu wrote: »
    RogueAgent wrote: »
    I have to respectfully disagree. It is naïve to think their is nothing out there? Casing point is all the new species in the deep oceans of our own planet.

    Life as we should all realise takes many different forms and in all shapes and sizes.

    Fair enough - but I'd rather see the human race try and sort itself out and all the problems here on Earth before we start thinking about what might be out there.

    Sadly my friend I don't think we will be around if that ever does happen?
  • BondStuBondStu Moonraker 6
    Posts: 357
    @RogueAgent - heard that Bro. :(
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited September 2019 Posts: 13,345
    BondStu wrote: »
    RogueAgent wrote: »
    I have to respectfully disagree. It is naïve to think their is nothing out there? Casing point is all the new species in the deep oceans of our own planet.

    Life as we should all realise takes many different forms and in all shapes and sizes.

    Fair enough - but I'd rather see the human race try and sort itself out and all the problems here on Earth before we start thinking about what might be out there.

    I'm sure that the "drunkie" under the bridge in A Clockwork Orange (1971) would agree with your sentiments! If you recall he said:

    "What sort of a world is it at all? Men on the moon and men spinning around the Earth and there's not no attention paid to earthly law and order no more."

    Naturally, I'm in agreement too.
  • WalecsWalecs On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    edited September 2019 Posts: 2,988
    BondStu wrote: »
    RogueAgent wrote: »
    I have to respectfully disagree. It is naïve to think their is nothing out there? Casing point is all the new species in the deep oceans of our own planet.

    Life as we should all realise takes many different forms and in all shapes and sizes.

    Fair enough - but I'd rather see the human race try and sort itself out and all the problems here on Earth before we start thinking about what might be out there.

    I totally agree. I quoted that very sentence from A Clockwork Orange (which actually stems from the 1962 novel and Kubrick reused it in his wonderful film) to my dad yesterday. But I see no harm in talking about aliens in a forum :D
  • BondStuBondStu Moonraker 6
    Posts: 357
    @Dragonpol @Walecs . I once was reading (or watching, can't remember) an interview with Jean Luc Picard himself, the one and only Patrick Stewart.

    When TNG was at it's most popular he was getting loads of fan letters. He was reading one in particular from a New York Detective and he found what this officer had to say quite moving.

    This cop saw some horrific things in his day to day work. And TNG was his escape from it. He said he made a point of never missing it, cause it was set in a future where there was no war and people weren't horrible to each other. For 45 minutes a week he had hope that things might get better for the human race.

    It's pretty much the same thing I like about Star Trek actually.


  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger San Demonique
    Posts: 36,559
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 2,497
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.
  • Posts: 4,784
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.
  • RichardTheBruceRichardTheBruce I'm motivated by my Duty.
    Posts: 6,479
    So regarding "Nazis in the Arctic", it's actually "Nazis in the Antarctic".

    Which is not the Arctic.
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  • Posts: 11,919
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.

    Absolutely bang on my friend! Could not have put it better! =D>
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    Posts: 13,345
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger San Demonique
    Posts: 36,559
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited May 3 Posts: 2,497
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.

    You're right. I'm hiding the aliens, and shrouding them under the cover of logic and common sense.
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited May 4 Posts: 13,345
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.

    You're right. I'm hiding the aliens, and shrouding them under the cover of logic and common sense.

    I never suggested that if you read what I posted. I merely meant that if aliens do exist in the universe it's rather convenient that our chances of ever encountering them are infinitely low. You know, it's almost as if they don't exist at all. And common sense is not one bit common.
  • ThunderfingerThunderfinger San Demonique
    Posts: 36,559
  • Posts: 4,784
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.

    You're right. I'm hiding the aliens, and shrouding them under the cover of logic and common sense.

    I never suggested that if you read what I posted. I merely meant that if aliens do exist in the universe it's rather convenient that our chances of ever encountering them are infinitely low. You know, it's almost as if they don't exist at all. And common sense is not one bit common.

    What's your point exactly?
  • DragonpolDragonpol Writer @ http://thebondologistblog.blogspot.com
    edited May 4 Posts: 13,345
    jobo wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.

    You're right. I'm hiding the aliens, and shrouding them under the cover of logic and common sense.

    I never suggested that if you read what I posted. I merely meant that if aliens do exist in the universe it's rather convenient that our chances of ever encountering them are infinitely low. You know, it's almost as if they don't exist at all. And common sense is not one bit common.

    What's your point exactly?

    I should have thought it was obvious. My exact point is that aliens don't exist and that it's very convenient indeed to say that they do exist but we'll never find them and they'll never find us. Where therefore, assuming you are taking the contrary view, is the hard evidence that they do exist?
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    edited May 4 Posts: 2,497
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.

    You're right. I'm hiding the aliens, and shrouding them under the cover of logic and common sense.

    I never suggested that if you read what I posted. I merely meant that if aliens do exist in the universe it's rather convenient that our chances of ever encountering them are infinitely low. You know, it's almost as if they don't exist at all. And common sense is not one bit common.

    What's your point exactly?

    I should have thought it was obvious. My exact point is that aliens don't exist and that it's very convenient indeed to say that they do exist but we'll never find them and they'll never find us. Where therefore, assuming you are taking the contrary view, is the hard evidence that they do exist?

    I didn’t say they do exist and we’ll never find them. I said the odds they exist are high and the odds we’ll find them are low.

    And I think I misinterpreted your original reply to me; I thought you believed aliens existed.

    I’m just saying, I think to truly understand the scope of the universe, it seems crazy to think we’re the only life forms in it, but also, due to the scope of the universe, the odds that they’d be right next to us, or a findable distance away from us, is low because of the sheer possibilities of places these other potential life forms could be. I think when you look at the universe from an odds perspective, it basically represents “infinite possibilities”.

    Think of it this way; if you have 1,000 dice and you roll them, what are the odds you get 1,000 sixes? Very low. Now what if you get infinite chances to roll those dice? Then your odds of rolling all sixes becomes infinitely high over time. But what’s your odds of rolling all sixes within the neighbourhood of the first ten, twenty, even a hundred rolls? Extremely low, I’d say.
  • edited May 4 Posts: 4,784
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    Dragonpol wrote: »
    jobo wrote: »
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.


    That is a sensible way of putting it.

    It is rather convenient too.

    You're right. I'm hiding the aliens, and shrouding them under the cover of logic and common sense.

    I never suggested that if you read what I posted. I merely meant that if aliens do exist in the universe it's rather convenient that our chances of ever encountering them are infinitely low. You know, it's almost as if they don't exist at all. And common sense is not one bit common.

    What's your point exactly?

    I should have thought it was obvious. My exact point is that aliens don't exist and that it's very convenient indeed to say that they do exist but we'll never find them and they'll never find us. Where therefore, assuming you are taking the contrary view, is the hard evidence that they do exist?

    It is very possible that we will never find the hard evidence. However, by the powers of logic and estimation we can assume life does exist somewhere in the universe. It all boils down to what the origins of life is to begin with: Is it a) a logical chemical conclution which will happen if the right circumstances allign (there are various scientiffic theories of which these might be), or is it b) a unique, incredible sircumstance, a miracle if you like. If a is true, then chances of life elsewhere is almost certain as (which was pointed out already) the universe is infinite with an infinite number of planets that will resemble earth, both past present or future. If b is right on the other hand... well, that is a lonely scenario isn't it?

    If the human race is ever capable of understanding the origins of life, it will almost certainly not be in our lifetime. However, if we discover life elsewhere in our solar system, it would give a stronger indication that thesis a is correct and that our existence is not such a miracle after all.
  • Posts: 555
    I think there'll be interesting times ahead when the James Webb Space Telescope gets going - eventually. I've read that it'll be a big step forward in being able to find out the chemical make-up of possible atmospheres of exo-planets. That'll be pretty exciting stuff, especially if they find Earth-like atmospheres in planets in the inhabitable zone.
    But as far as alien Earth visitations, if they've been here, I don't think it was recently!
  • suavejmfsuavejmf Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England
    Posts: 4,304
    In an infinitely large universe (practically speaking), it seems to me the odds of extra terrestrial life are infinitely high, and our chances of ever encountering it are infinitely low.

    Exactly.
  • Posts: 4,073
    The concept that there are NOT aliens is perhaps one of the best examples I can think of regarding the conceit of the human species.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,643
    I'm fully with @NickTwentyTwo on this (and I suppose with @patb too). The same probability calculus that practically assures that there must be aliens SOMEWHERE also practically rules out that we ever meet them, except by extreme conincidence. But the notion that only the Earth, among billions of planets, should be a place to breed "intelligent" life (very questionable in itself, as proved daily in these times) is totally ludicrous. And that's not even taking into account the possibility that alien life may not be limited to being based on our known chemical elements and processes, but that there may be a considerable number of alternative life sources that we do not know about. Maybe carbon and hydrogen and oxygen aren't everything. Maybe even mathematics function differently in other galaxies. I don't think anyone could reasonably claim to know.
  • Posts: 7,489
    we will not meet them in our life times I expect, if they are already there so be it.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 2,497
    One thing I will say that could sway the odds in interaction's favour, is there's always the chance that if there's highly intelligent life out in the universe, it's always possible they could develop the technology to locate other forms of life (ie, humans), increasing the likelihood up a bit from infinitely low.
  • Posts: 7,489
    Perhaps they are currently using social distancing in 1,5 lightyears
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 2,497
    SaintMark wrote: »
    Perhaps they are currently using social distancing in 1,5 lightyears

    One look at us and it'd be easy to understand.
  • Posts: 4,784
    SaintMark wrote: »
    we will not meet them in our life times I expect, if they are already there so be it.

    Interacting with intelligent life forms is unthinkable yes. I don't think it is impossible that we could find primitive cell organisms under the surface of Mars or on the moons of Europa or Enceladus.
  • j_w_pepperj_w_pepper Hamburg, near the Atlantic Hotel
    Posts: 5,643
    jobo wrote: »
    SaintMark wrote: »
    we will not meet them in our life times I expect, if they are already there so be it.

    Interacting with intelligent life forms is unthinkable yes. I don't think it is impossible that we could find primitive cell organisms under the surface of Mars or on the moons of Europa or Enceladus.

    I wouldn't even say that it's "unthinkable". I just think that the odds are overwhelmingly against all likelihood that it will happen. And the fact that we think it requires "intelligent" life forms further slims down the chances. Though looking at the Earth today, it may not be so hard to surpass human intelligence.
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