No Time to Die production thread (MINOR SPOILERS ALLOWED)

19699709729749751211

Comments

  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,748
    I concur. I would pay an obscene amount to watch it now or in April for that matter. So long as it doesn’t get delayed again.
  • Posts: 777
    Creasy47 wrote: »
    I do hope they take a hybrid route for this film sooner rather than later, instead of a predictable yet last second delay to the end of the year. Sucks knowing it's finished and it's just...sitting there, waiting to be viewed. I'll take it now, please.

    I didn't think that would bother me as much as it's come to (initially, I was just grateful the film was actually completed and the pandemic didn't impede that -- could you imagine?)

    But as time goes on, yes. It's getting harder and harder to know it's just sitting there, along with a finished Hans Zimmer 007 score that I'm dying to hear.

    We're a year today, I believe, from that first trailer being released. And my fear is we're still nearly a year away from actually seeing the thing.

    We have a lot to be thankful for in the fact that we even still get James Bond films in this day and age, and certainly to the caliber of the ones we've been getting. But I also can't think of another franchise with a fanbase that's been asked to stomach these kinds of delays, gaps, and repeated gut punches in modern times. It sometimes seems like the best of times, and the worst of times, to be a Bond fan.
  • @AgentM72
    Very well said. It's really frustrating.
  • Posts: 1,196
    How much would you pay to go to a premium screening of NTTD alongside a streaming release?
  • matt_umatt_u better known as Mr. Roark
    edited December 2020 Posts: 3,474
    It seems the production budget for NTTD is $290 million.

    https://hmssweblog.wordpress.com/2020/12/03/nttd-cost-approaches-290m-b25-says/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

    The cost of No Time to Die was approaching $290 million as of mid-year, according to a U.K. regulatory filing.

    B25 Ltd., in a Dec. 1 filing, put the cost at 213.9 million British pounds as of June 30 for a “work in progress.” The filing defines that as “costs incurred on film production for which the film has not yet been completed or delivered.”

    At current exchange rates, that’s about $287.7 million.

    Eon Productions formed B25 as part of the making of No Time to Die. The movie has been delayed multiple times, including twice because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    No Time to Die currently is scheduled for release in April 2021.

    The filing also said the company received 95,487 pounds (about $128,600) as part of a U.K. job retention program. The payments were related to “furlough costs for payroll staff” from March to June 2020. The average monthly number of people employed was 25. The government payments were reported earlier this week by the Daily Mail.
  • Posts: 1,196
    I know there is inflation but I can never get my head around these current budgets when compared to the Goldfinger, Thunderball and YOLT budgets.
  • SuperintendentSuperintendent A separate pool. For sharks, no less.
    Posts: 862

    :)

    EoVjkloVQAArk2l?format=jpg&name=medium
  • ResurrectionResurrection Kolkata, India
    Posts: 2,541
    290 million 😳
  • 007InAction007InAction Australia
    Posts: 1,337
    no-time-to-die-the-love-boat-007-the-new-63862000.png :))
  • Posts: 1,196
    no-time-to-die-the-love-boat-007-the-new-63862000.png :))

    This was pretty obvious from the first moment they released the first poster.
  • Posts: 15,557
    no-time-to-die-the-love-boat-007-the-new-63862000.png :))

    And Man in a Suitcase, if I remember correctly.
  • HildebrandRarityHildebrandRarity Centre international d'assistance aux personnes déplacées, Paris, France
    Posts: 342
    The font is Futura Black. I'm pretty sure tabloids would take that as evidence that Lashana Lynch is the future Bond.
  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,748
    Every time I see a commercial for the Land Rover Defender, I get more and more excited to see the Norway chase. I wish we had some more details about it.
  • NickTwentyTwoNickTwentyTwo Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts: 4,412
    I subscribe so I’d be into it. Provided it’s available in Canada!
  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,748
    Interesting development. However, no indication on the matter of streaming.
  • Posts: 1,196
    OK, It was just reported that the roll out for the vaccine, in the us, is going to be much slower than expected and June is much closer to the date for the general public. Why would Eon now chance an April release?
  • DonnyDB5DonnyDB5 Buffalo, New York
    Posts: 1,748
    They won’t. The movie will be delayed to the summer or November.
  • 007InAction007InAction Australia
    Posts: 1,337
    Filmmaker Christopher Nolan calls HBO Max the ‘worst streaming service’ and that ‘their decision makes no economic sense’ after WarnerMedia announced that it would send 17 of its films directly to the streaming service in 2021.

    “Some of the biggest filmmakers and most important stars went to bed thinking they were working for a studio and woke to find out they’re working for the worst streaming service. WB had an incredible machine for [releasing movies] and they are dismantling it.” - Christopher Nolan
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 6,470
    Nolan's a bit of a whingebag. Nobody is particular happy about this situation - save for the odd few who don't enjoy going to the cinema anymore anyway.
  • Posts: 1,115
    What’s funny about Nolan is that we wouldn’t be in this situation if he wasn’t so adamant in pressuring WB into theatrically releasing Tenet in the height of the pandemic.
    The fact that his movie lost so much money on its theatrical run is the reason Warner Bros are now experimenting with this distribution model.
  • I see where you're coming from, but what would have happened / what would be happening now if Tenet hadn't been released in cinemas when it was?
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    Posts: 6,470
    TR007 wrote: »
    What’s funny about Nolan is that we wouldn’t be in this situation if he wasn’t so adamant in pressuring WB into theatrically releasing Tenet in the height of the pandemic.

    Did he really have much of a say in the matter?
  • Posts: 1,115
    TR007 wrote: »
    What’s funny about Nolan is that we wouldn’t be in this situation if he wasn’t so adamant in pressuring WB into theatrically releasing Tenet in the height of the pandemic.

    Did he really have much of a say in the matter?
    According to all the trades he seriously pushed for Warner Bros to release it theatrically during the summer.
  • MalloryMallory Are you ready to get back to work?
    Posts: 1,444
    A box office haul of $360m during a global pandemic and a by and large shut down US market is pretty decent, except when your film costs $200m plus marketing. Oops. Personally I dont think Tenet was the best choice to try and “revive” cinemas over the summer, given its a new IP, WB wouldve been better off with WW84. But hey ho.

    Least I can now watch Tenet at home with the subtitles on 🤣
  • I see where you're coming from, but what would have happened / what would be happening now if Tenet hadn't been released in cinemas when it was?

    Exactly. Think of it this way: the second worst thing about the pandemic (the first, obviously, being the health impacts) is the uncertainty about what exactly is the best course of action, and that uncertainty stems from lack of data. We still don't know precisely how effective various parts of lockdowns and restrictions are: is it schools, is it businesses, which kinds of businesses, is it household gatherings, etc? Without data points, it's difficult to make decisions.

    So in a manner of speaking, Tenet served a useful purpose by providing a data point that the industry needed to justify whether to continue postponing movies or to press on with half-capacity theatres, because lest we forget, over the summer NOBODY KNEW WHAT TO DO NEXT. Personally, I thought Tenet sucked as a movie and my partner and I had a horrible experience at the theatre where nobody else wore their mask at all which led my partner to decide that she wouldn't go to any more movies until the pandemic is over... However, I'll forgive Nolan for having a vision of his movie up on screens and wanting to stay true to that considering that he basically sacrificed a pet project so that the rest of the industry could realize that trying to sail half-speed into an even bigger wave of the virus was, for all intents and purposes, untenable.

    Also, Nolan's actions in regards to Tenet and subsequent impacts on the movie industry don't inherently disqualify or disprove his remarks about the quality and reach of HBO Max.
  • TripAcesTripAces Universal Exports
    Posts: 4,283
    Nolan's a bit of a whingebag. Nobody is particular happy about this situation - save for the odd few who don't enjoy going to the cinema anymore anyway.

    Some forward-thinking directors are embracing what streaming has to offer.
  • Posts: 569
    TripAces wrote: »
    Nolan's a bit of a whingebag. Nobody is particular happy about this situation - save for the odd few who don't enjoy going to the cinema anymore anyway.

    Some forward-thinking directors are embracing what streaming has to offer.

    What does it has to offer besides their paycheck?
    I bet every director would love to see his work on the silver screen.
  • CraigMooreOHMSSCraigMooreOHMSS Dublin, Ireland
    edited December 2020 Posts: 6,470
    TripAces wrote: »
    Nolan's a bit of a whingebag. Nobody is particular happy about this situation - save for the odd few who don't enjoy going to the cinema anymore anyway.

    Some forward-thinking directors are embracing what streaming has to offer.

    Undoubtedly, but I think if you asked most (if not all) directors what their preference would be, it would be that their films are seen on the "biggest screen possible". That's not to say that they're not aware of the reality of the business; certainly if they weren't before then they are now. One thing I do agree with Nolan about is that it was poor form to not talk to the directors of the films before making the decision that they made.

    The switch to streaming is only of real benefit to a small number of those who don't value the 'big screen experience' anymore.
  • Posts: 1,297
    TripAces wrote: »
    Nolan's a bit of a whingebag. Nobody is particular happy about this situation - save for the odd few who don't enjoy going to the cinema anymore anyway.

    Some forward-thinking directors are embracing what streaming has to offer.

    No they're not, they are just trying to survive. Believe me, I'm in the film business, and I know the reality first hand - and no director or writer or producer, worth their salt, want to see their "blood, sweat and tears" hard work dumped and devalued on streaming.

Sign In or Register to comment.